Do you need sterile gloves for UC? - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 19 Old 11-27-2013, 05:04 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Do you really use these and for what? Do you need them to handle the scissors and thread you will cut the cord with or not? Are they used for anything else in a UC?
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#2 of 19 Old 11-27-2013, 05:24 PM
 
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Honestly, you just need to make sure your hands have been washed.
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#3 of 19 Old 11-27-2013, 06:25 PM
 
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No. There really isn't anything sterile about birth.

 

If I had strangers touching in there or the baby/ cord after birth, I would want them to wear gloves because their flora is not mine. Otherwise, no gloves needed. 

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#4 of 19 Old 12-09-2013, 06:37 PM
 
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Infection causes a large percentage of maternal deaths in developing countries. In America, we don’t really fear infection because we have, in general, less experience with it or loss from it. Because of this, we can tend toward carelessness. The material presented here is only referred back to later, so please mark this page for reference and review.

Aseptic techniques are practices that reduce exposure to infection. They include:

·     

Hand washing as described below.

·      Clean clothing: anyone coming into contact with the mother should take care to not have any loose dirt or contaminants on their clothing.

·      A clean environment: all pillows and sheets the mother will be in contact with should be freshly laundered and have no mildew, food, or bodily fluids on them. The toilet, shower, or bath should be bleached before hand.

 

·      Any tools being used for the birth (such as scissors, mirrors, etc.) should be bleached and then heat dried (if possible). You can sterilize a knife or scissors by scrubbing clean and then boiling for 20 minutes or soaking in alcohol or hydrogen peroxide for 20 minutes.

·       Quick removal of bodily fluids including vomit, feces, urine, or blood.

·      Quick removal of soiled or moist dressings, drapes, or bedding. Anything moist is considered contaminated.[i]

 

Antiseptic Handwashing Technique

Apply an antiseptic (such as an iodophor sanitizer) and scrub your hands and fingernail beds for 3 minutes under running water. Keep hands above the elbows during whole washing period. Dry hands carefully as water breeds pathogens. Be careful to turn off the water with a dry barrier between you and the faucet. If no water is available, apply alcohol sanitizer to the hands and fingernail beds and wait until it is dry. Wash your hands before you apply gloves in case the gloves are torn or nicked during use. Bacteria grows quickly inside warm moist gloves, so be careful to also wash your hands after you take the gloves off.

Apply gloves. Do not let your bare hands touch the outside surface of the glove. Do not let your gloved hand touch bare skin or the inner part of the other glove’s surface.[ii]

Even after surgical scrubs, bare hands are always considered potentially infectious and should never come in direct contact with sterile equipment or access points to the mother’s internal body. After hands are completely dry, pick up the gloves from the inside to apply.

 

[i] Beare, Patricia Gauntlet, And Judith L. Myers. Adult Health Nursing, 3rd Ed., Ed. Michael S. Ledbetter. St. Louis: Mosby, Inc., 1998.

[ii] American College Of Surgeons. Manual On Control Of Infection In Surgical Patients. J. B. Lippincott Co. Philadelphia: 1976

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#5 of 19 Old 12-15-2013, 10:38 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks to all for your replies. To the person who suggested bleach, that's something I can't and won't do. I'm allergic to it and actually think its more dangerous than any germs.
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#6 of 19 Old 12-15-2013, 04:31 PM
 
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Unbelievable, have you ever given spontaneous birth? Fecal matter is very much a part of it. Baby needs to be exposed to mommy flora. No one is sticking their hands inside you in a normal home birth. Why would you wear sterile gloves in a normal birth setting? To hold your newborn? This represents a serious disconnect from normal, unhindered birth.
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#7 of 19 Old 12-15-2013, 04:34 PM
 
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Open wounds are also not a normal part of birth. Tears and injuries cannot be protects from germs by sterile gloves. The bacteria is all around and in you. Good self care and staying away from foreign germs are both good ideas. Again I will say, I would only use sterile gloves to cover someone else's - a strangers- hands.

Hi, I'm Tabitha. I'm a homeschooling mother of four: ds (11) dd (9) ds (7) ds (5) And I'm expecting a fifth in 2014! Find me at http://www.omelay.blogspot.com
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#8 of 19 Old 12-15-2013, 04:41 PM
 
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Where are you putting the gloves? How will gloves protect vaginal tears from fecal matter? Gloves are for people to wear on their hands, and this thread is about gloves. If you transfer to a medical facility, the staff will use gloves, as they should. The OP asked if she needed them in her home for a UC.

Hi, I'm Tabitha. I'm a homeschooling mother of four: ds (11) dd (9) ds (7) ds (5) And I'm expecting a fifth in 2014! Find me at http://www.omelay.blogspot.com
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#9 of 19 Old 12-15-2013, 04:42 PM
 
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The original question wasn't about sterilizing instruments. By all means, yes, make sure all equipment is super clean. But most babies are born with blood and many are born covered in fecal matter, so I'm not really sure how gloves or sterilization could help with that.

I'm also very interested in your intentions here, Unbelievable. Do you even support UC? I noticed you joined Mothering.com today, and I've only seen two unsupportive posts from you.
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#10 of 19 Old 12-20-2013, 08:46 AM - Thread Starter
 
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to update, here's what we ended up doing: we sterilized by boiling the scissors and hemp cord and left it sitting covered in that pot of water, as we found this info on a midwifery site. we did not use gloves at all. no problems. Dh and i discussed it and decided birth is not sterile and since we will be in our own home we are not exposed to too many foreign germs like in a hospital. no issues, baby's cord is not infected, in fact its drying out very quickly.
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#11 of 19 Old 12-20-2013, 09:50 AM
 
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I had some because my friend helped with perennial massage and counter pressure. It made me more comfortable that she wore gloves.

Unassisted birthing, atheist, poly, bi WOHM to 4 wonderful, smart homeschooling kids Wes (14) Seth (7) Pandora Moonlilly (2) and Nevermore Stargazer (11/2012)  Married to awesome SAH DH.

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#12 of 19 Old 06-06-2014, 03:00 PM
 
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I personally have them available for others.... but typically I haven't had others do anything.... and I don't feel the need for my hands.... when helping a friend deliver I for sure had them..... for my benefit
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#13 of 19 Old 07-06-2014, 12:57 PM
 
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I don't use them. It seems unnecessary to me b/c I'm not going to wear them any other time I touch the baby, so why would I need them to hold the baby after he is born?

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#14 of 19 Old 07-06-2014, 03:37 PM
 
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RachaelsMommy, are you going to have someone check for tears after the birth?

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#15 of 19 Old 07-06-2014, 07:47 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlessedOne View Post
I personally have them available for others.... but typically I haven't had others do anything.... and I don't feel the need for my hands.... when helping a friend deliver I for sure had them..... for my benefit
if you have people cleaning up afterwards that might be bothered by touching stuff that might have a bit of a mess on it, then gloves are nice...
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#16 of 19 Old 07-07-2014, 01:48 AM
 
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You don't need sterile gloves for cleaning up though. Or for doing anything other than suturing really. Just ordinary vinyl or latex gloves. If it is just for cleaning up a pair of washing up gloves would also be fine, although I'd suggest throwing them out with the rest of the rubbish as it would be hard to clean them properly if they were bloodied. Still likely to be cheaper than a box of 100 vinyl gloves, and less waste.
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#17 of 19 Old 07-07-2014, 02:14 PM
 
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^^ true.....I typically have a box of disposable gloves on hand that has lasted me like over 4 years! lol....I don't think they are "sterile" just the basic thin vinyl ones...
I personally would feel better tossing the thinner ones than the thicker cleaning style, but that is just me....although the longer sleeves could be handier =)
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#18 of 19 Old 07-08-2014, 02:47 AM
 
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Yep, the ones which come in a box all stuffed in together are not sterile. The sterile ones are wrapped in in paper and each pair is in it's own individual sealed envelope. There is also a special technique for putting them on so that they remain sterile.
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#19 of 19 Old 07-08-2014, 12:00 PM
 
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yes true...I guess I just dismissed the "sterile" part and just focused on the glove part..lol
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