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Old 12-07-2005, 04:50 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Hello Everyone,
I am new here and I have lots of questions that I'm hoping that you experienced UC's can help me with.
First, I want to say that my DS was born 01/20/2005 at a birth center. Recently I have been reading about UC and I am very interested in finding out as much info as possible about it. My labor with my DS was for the most part excruciating even though I was in water after I got to 5cm, I did not have a water birth because the midwife said that I was not progressing and she needed to check me, at this point I was 10cm but she kept me out of the water. After that I pushed for over an hour, they finally figured out that his head was butting against my pelvis and he had to be a bit repositioned to come out. For the most part things went well but I find myself feeling angry about not having the water birth, having to push so long, etc. I had only had 2 hours of sleep before my water broke and contractions started and lobored for 17.5 hours.
When my Mother had me she was completely under and I have always
wondered how women give birth without pushing and no use of interventions. Yesterday I was reading that for the most part you don't have to push! is that so? How long did all of you labor? I have read several posts that say labor was very short. Am I just one of those women that will inevitably have a long labor? Or could it have anything to do with my care? :
Also, I had a lot of bleeding afterward and had to have Pitocin. I am concerned about that, what if that happens with a UC, I do not want to go to the hospital for any reason. Really I figured that was because of all the pushing. Are there any of you out there that are over 35? I never did feel old until I conceived at 35 and then everyone made me feel like I was over the hill. This may sound like a stupid question but- Do you still go in for all the routine prenatal check-ups when you are planning a UC? We did not have anything other than blood work done with my DS, no ultrasound or anything like that, didn't even know he was a boy. Thanks so much in advance.

Donnie fully attached Momma to Michael 01/20/2005
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Old 12-07-2005, 06:50 PM
 
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First of all, congratulations on your baby, and his upcoming birthday!

I am not a UC mama (yet!) but as a doula and childbirth educator, I thought I might be able to offer some reassurance. It seems like I am reading a lot of comparisons in your post- comparing your labor to others. One of the things that I think might help is if you reframe your perception of what labor is supposed to be like- 17.5 hours is totally within the realm of average, and to me (having been at too many 35+ hour labors), even seems pretty short! And the pushing stage can range anywhere from a few pushes to several hours- one hour or so is totally typical! I think it is important to remember that your body grows the baby it is supposed to birth, and labors the length of time that your baby needs to enter the world. Trusting your body to know what it's doing and accepting that all labors are different might help you feel more confident about your experience. Of course there will always be people who will tell you about their 2 hour birth, but remember, short births are often harder since the body has no time to adjust. Your baby needed 17.5 hours to work with your body and have the best possible outcome- that was the timeframe that was perfect for that birth!

I think it also sounds as though you might be grieving the loss of your expected birth experience- you didn't get the water birth that you had been planning on, and that is a loss that you need to deal with. It can be hard, especially since most people don't understand what you have to be upset about- after all, you got your healthy baby! But I firmly feel that all losses as they are perceived by the person are valid and important to recognize. Perhaps if you start working on processing the losses you feel from your birth experience, you can start formulating ways to frame your next birth in your mind.

Best wishes for your next birth experience!
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Old 12-07-2005, 07:03 PM
 
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I have not had a UC - although almost did
But I do know that your first birth doesnt always tell you anything about the second one.
My first birth was a 50 hour marathon ending in pitocin and epidural.
When I got pregnant again I was certain that I would have a long hard labor like the first time. I thought that anything less than 24 hours would be a quick birth to me - and I thought that if I was very very lucky to get a really fast birth then that would mean a 6-8 hour labor.
My second labor was 90 minutes of active labor! (several days before that with early labor on and off but I didn't count that since I got my sleep and cx werent very painful)
I did not push a single time to get my daughter out - quite the contrary I panted her all the way out. I only gave a slight push to free the shoulders and that was the only time I did any active pushing.
My second labor was a textbook example of a fast uncomplicated delivery with hardly any bleeding, no tears, a beautiful healthy pink baby who nursed right away. Literally NO complications.

About hemmorage then there is a greater risk to bleed alot if you have a long hard labor so your uterus is exhausted. A good way to prevent it from happening is to sit up straight after birth and to bf straight after birth too.

When you decide what kind of birth you want I don't think you should worry too much about your first birth unless you had complications that are still present in this pregnancy.

Good luck.

Inca

Single mom to ds(8), dd(6) and ds(5)
 

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Old 12-13-2005, 03:30 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GEMINI69
Yesterday I was reading that for the most part you don't have to push! is that so? How long did all of you labor? I have read several posts that say labor was very short. Am I just one of those women that will inevitably have a long labor? Or could it have anything to do with my care? : Also, I had a lot of bleeding afterward and had to have Pitocin. I am concerned about that, what if that happens with a UC, I do not want to go to the hospital for any reason. Really I figured that was because of all the pushing. Are there any of you out there that are over 35? I never did feel old until I conceived at 35 and then everyone made me feel like I was over the hill. This may sound like a stupid question but- Do you still go in for all the routine prenatal check-ups when you are planning a UC?
Well, you don't have to push deliberately. At some point probably you will get an overwhelming feeling of bearing down and will not feel able to stop it (or want to,) but in a normal spontaneous birth, that stage doesn't last for long -- usually a matter of minutes. A second stage of an hour or more is very typical, but no, not normal.

Your long labor may have had everything to do with your care, but even in an ideal setting there are reasons a labor might be longer. Maybe there's a mental or emotional barrier. Or maybe it's the body just doing what it needs to to get that baby out in the best shape possible (which I think was the case with my own long UC.)

Hemorrhage is more likely when second and third stage of labor are managed: when there is any wrench thrown in the hormonal choreography (drugs, distracting or directing the mother, fear, uterus is worn out by putting unnecessary pressure on it, touching the cord before the baby it out, cutting the cord early, etc.) the body doesn't get the cues it needs, or it gets confusing cues, so the uterus does not get the message (by way of the hormones) to clamp down. If you are healthy and the pregnancy has been healthy, and the labor has been allowed to be spontaneous and instinctive, there is very little risk of hemorrhage. Nature, however, has a built-in safety feature: the placenta itself. Ever wonder why mammals eat their placentas? It has chemicals in it that cause that uterus to clamp down fast. If you're worried, just plan on swallowing a bit, or putting it under your tongue first thing.

I'm over 35. I had my first UC at age 35, and my second at age 38. It makes me laugh thinking of how the doctors would be referring to me as having "advanced maternal age". The way I see it (and the way I feel,) I am in the prime of my childbearing years. I am quite sure that many women my age are health-wise much older than their actual years, but a lot of women my age also have a huge amount of stress on them. It's all relative.

Finally, no, I didn't do traditional prenatal care. Didn't see the point. I was healthy and felt good, and the baby was active and in a good position. What on earth did I need a doctor for? Doctors are for sick people, or people who can't tell if they're sick or not. I did have a midwife tell me what she thought about the baby's and placenta's position, though even that wasn't necessary. Aside from that I just paid attention to how I was feeling and if anything seemed "off", I paid closer attention and sometimes did some monitoring (like taking blood pressure.)
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Old 12-22-2005, 12:13 AM
 
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I never had to deliberately push out any of my three children; my uterus did all the work it was designed to do. If you are just in the instinctual birthing zone, without input from anyone else, your body will push when it is meant to, all by itself. With my first birth, I felt my body begin pushing fairly early on, but with my last two, there weren't more than 3-5 real pushes (I don't know. . .about 10 minutes?) before the babies emerged. I would definitely think that there is a correlation between forced, "directed" pushing before the body is actually ready (just because someone has determined you to be a particular # of centimeters dilated doesn't mean a damn thing) and placental or other postpartum problems, so if you have a normal, natural birth (uc, heh), most of the issues you are worried about won't BE issues. Like Linda (fourlittlebirds), I believed also that if there HAD been a bleeding issue, the placenta would have provided for me what I needed to stop bleeding, so I wasn't too concerned about that.

I just replied to another post about UP'ing, so I won't repeat it all here, but I absolutely LOVED doing the whole pregnancy by myself.

Kelli, radical unschooling mama to four beautiful homebirthed lovies (ages 14, 9, 5, and 19 months) 
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