Gloria Lemay's reaction to the UC piece on GMA - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 34 Old 01-09-2008, 07:48 PM - Thread Starter
 
GentleBirth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 244
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Just got this in my e-mail, thought you all would find it interesting! :


<<The baby could be born in a breach position, or with the umbilical cord wrapped around its neck. The mother could suffer from significant tearing or from a maternal hemorrhage and bleed to death in as little as five minutes.>>



Dear Women, the above quote is by a physician who was interviewed by Good Morning America for a program about Unassisted Birth on Jan 8, 2008.



http://abcnews. go.com/GMA/ TurningPoints/ story?id= 4098198&page=1



Please feel free to repost what I'm about to tell you. I think it's very important to address the statement that a woman can hemorrhage and bleed to death in as little as five minutes. This is a very horrifying comment for a dr to make and, for anyone who doesn't really know birth, it could be enough to send them running for the hospital.



First of all, yes, it's possible to hemorrhage and bleed to death quickly in birth IF YOU HAVE A SURGICAL WOUNDING. Women die from bleeding in cesareans and with episiotomies. The closest to death that I have ever seen a woman in childbirth was in a hospital birth where the ob/gyn cut an episiotomy, pulled the baby out quickly with forceps and then left the family doctor to repair the poor woman. We were skating in the blood on the floor and desperately trying to get enough I.V. fluids into her to save her life while the family doctor tried to suture as fast as he could. I have never seen anything like that in a home birth setting or a hospital birth that didn't involve cutting.



Think about it, would any midwife ever go to a homebirth if it was possible for the mother to die from bleeding in five minutes? I know I wouldn't go if that could happen. We had a visit here in Vancouver BC from an ob/gyn from Holland back in the 1980's. Dr. Kloosterman was the head of Dutch maternity services for many years and he was a real friend to homebirth and midwifery. He told us that you have AN HOUR after a natural birth before the woman will be in trouble from bleeding. Does this mean that you wait for an hour to take action with a bleeding woman? No, of course not. If there's more blood than is normal, you need to call 911 and transport to the hospital within the hour, but you're not going to have a maternal death before an hour is up. I have had 10 transports for hemorrhage in the many homebirths that I have attended (over 1000). Two women have required transfusions. The other 8 recovered with I. V. fluids, rest and iron supplements. Of course, no one wants to see blood transfusions in this day and age. We also don't like to see a woman anemic after having a baby because it makes the postpartum time very difficult. The most important action after having a baby is to keep the mother and baby skin to skin continuously for at least the first 4 hours.



What doctors won't tell you is that the most severe cases of postpartum anemia are in women who have had cesareans. Major abdominal surgery results in anemia. I have a friend who is a pharmacist in a hospital. He spends most of his days trying to figure out individual plans to help cesarean moms get their hemoglobin counts up. He finds these cases of severe anemia in post operative mothers very distressing.



I hope this information is helpful to you.



As far as the other nonsense this person is trying to frighten you with:



1. Significant tearing---if you look with a mirror at your vulva after birth and there seems to be skin that "flaps" away from the rest of the vulva structures, you can always go into the emergency ward and have someone suture the wound. Tears do not bleed like cuts do. This should not dissuade anyone from staying away from the place where the scalpels reside.



2. Breech position---you' ll know if your baby is breech. When the membranes release, you will see black meconium coming out the consistency of toothpaste. With a head first baby, the meconium colours the water green or brown but with a breech, the meconium is being squeezed directly out without mixing with water. The other way that you should suspect a breech presentation is if you have a feeling from about 34 weeks of pregnancy on that you have "a hard ball stuck in your ribs". Breech presentations are about 3 percent of births.



3. Cord wrapped around the neck---the smart babies put their cords around their necks to keep them out of trouble. If you have a baby with the cord around the neck, it can be unwrapped very easily either during or right after the birth. The most important thing is to keep the cord intact.



Gloria Lemay, Vancouver BC Canada



Advisory Board Member, ICAN



Contributing Ed. Midwifery Today Magazine
GentleBirth is offline  
#2 of 34 Old 01-09-2008, 08:08 PM
 
NatureMama3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Catching life's curveballs
Posts: 5,741
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
LOVE IT!

I do agree that uterine hemorrhaging is NOT the same as that quote by the doc. Praise the Lord too! I hemorrhaged during a 12 week loss and would have been dead 25 minutes before the ambulance arrived if his quote were true!
NatureMama3 is offline  
#3 of 34 Old 01-09-2008, 08:12 PM
 
APBTlover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Southern US
Posts: 754
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
That's great!

My DH laughed when I told him what that doctor said.

I also wish more people were aware that a cord around the neck is not a medical emergency, and that OBs would stop trying to make us believe that it is! I have had numerous women acquaintances get bullied into a c-sec and say, "It's a good thing, too... his cord was around his neck. If not for the OB and the hospital, my baby would have died!"

treehugger.gif SAHM with a precious toddler and the love of my life, expecting a new little one July 2014!
APBTlover is offline  
#4 of 34 Old 01-09-2008, 09:53 PM
 
sapphire_chan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 27,779
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
"Bleed to death in 5 minutes"

So there are arteries inside the uterus?
sapphire_chan is offline  
#5 of 34 Old 01-10-2008, 01:21 AM
 
Sileree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: SE Michigan
Posts: 1,079
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thank you so much for this!

intactivist.gif  ribbonpb.gif RN student, bellycast.gif birth doula since 2006
Sileree is offline  
#6 of 34 Old 01-10-2008, 01:26 AM
 
barefoot mama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,528
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thank you for posting this! Although I laughed at the doctor's first three comments, I have to admit that his comment about hemmorrhage made me wonder how that could happen. I couldn't figure it out, and I am someone who has hemmorrhaged after a UC and obviously survived, even though we didn't have help come for an hour or so. So I was thinking maybe it had to do with the gushing sort of hemmorrhage "they" talk about. But the fact that it is related to surgical wounding makes perfect sense. And of course that ridiculous doctor would think it could happen anywhere, because truly natural birth is just exactly what happens in the hospital, right?:
barefoot mama is offline  
#7 of 34 Old 01-10-2008, 01:53 AM
 
Kidzaplenty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Writing my Happily Ever After
Posts: 16,983
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I think it is fitting for a doctor to make blanket statements that are easily refuted. I just wish more people could hear the idiocy in them.

Any misspellings or grammatical errors in the above statement are intentional;
they are placed there for the amusement of those who like to point them out.
Kidzaplenty is offline  
#8 of 34 Old 01-10-2008, 02:57 AM
 
reducereuserecycle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,959
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
thanks for posting that

::
reducereuserecycle is offline  
#9 of 34 Old 01-10-2008, 03:17 AM
 
crazy_eights's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Nisht ahir un nish aher
Posts: 6,837
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If a woman would bleed to death in 5 minutes, being in the hospital wouldn't do anything for her. Just to retrieve the medications used for hemorrhage takes a few minutes and once given the onset is not instantaneous. What a stupid thing to say.
crazy_eights is offline  
#10 of 34 Old 01-10-2008, 03:18 AM
 
augustacherri's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Missouri
Posts: 673
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Yes, thank you for posting that.

More women need to be exposed to the truth! It always irks me when doctors ABUSE women by LYING TO and SCARING them with information that is blatantly false.
augustacherri is offline  
#11 of 34 Old 01-10-2008, 07:59 AM
 
atlee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by sapphire_chan View Post
"Bleed to death in 5 minutes"

So there are arteries inside the uterus?
Per Wikipedia, the mother's blood passes into the placenta by means of 80 to 100 endometrial arteries.

At term, the total blood flow through the uterine arteries into the uterus is almost 1 liter per minute. A pregnant woman has 7-8 liters of blood in her body, so in cases of severe hemorrhage, it doesn't take long for blood volume to drop to critical levels.
atlee is offline  
#12 of 34 Old 01-10-2008, 11:10 AM
 
NatureMama3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Catching life's curveballs
Posts: 5,741
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
In all reality women DO die from hemorrhage in the hospital plenty. The OB who did my ectopic had a mother die from hemorrhage in minutes (grand mulitipara) and there was NOTHING he could do to stop it. In the hospital. In the OR.

Birth will never be 100% safe.
NatureMama3 is offline  
#13 of 34 Old 01-10-2008, 01:19 PM
 
Testifyer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Indiana
Posts: 27
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by NatureMama3 View Post
In all reality women DO die from hemorrhage in the hospital plenty. The OB who did my ectopic had a mother die from hemorrhage in minutes (grand mulitipara) and there was NOTHING he could do to stop it. In the hospital. In the OR.

Birth will never be 100% safe.
It's interesting that you say that because my dh is hesitant of a UC for that very reason. He doesn't think birth is safe either. He thinks I'm at my most vulnerable during and after.

I thought most proponents for UC and home birth say birth is safe....

Wife of my best friend, Mom to five and one precious memory
Testifyer is offline  
#14 of 34 Old 01-10-2008, 02:04 PM
 
LoveChild421's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: North GA
Posts: 4,593
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Testifyer View Post
It's interesting that you say that because my dh is hesitant of a UC for that very reason. He doesn't think birth is safe either. He thinks I'm at my most vulnerable during and after.

I thought most proponents for UC and home birth say birth is safe....
There is always some risk involved with birth. Those of us who choose homebirth are aware that the risks involved during hospital birth put us at greater risk rather than reduce the risks.

What role does having an exhausted/ hyperstimulated uterus from pitocin or other drugs play in the frequency and severity of maternal hemorrhage? What role do narcotics and epidurals play? What role does having the baby taken away to be "inspected" and given all the routine procedures rather than given to the mother to nurse IMMEDIATELY play? Nursing helps the uterus contract. Nature gives us safeguards. Along with episiotomies and C-sections, these powerful drugs and unnatural procedures and policies will cause the uterus to not react the same way it would in a natural birth and I would argue that maternal hemorrhage, and more severe hemorrhage is more common in a hospital setting.

Jen read.gif Mama of 2 precious boys blowkiss.gif (9)  flowersforyou.gif (6)  and still in heartbeat.gif with my Matt hat.gif after 12 years together. 

rainbow1284.gif Domestic Violence Children's Advocate and Counselor hug2.gif

 homebirth.jpg bf.jpg nocirc.gif ribbonjigsaw.gif 

LoveChild421 is offline  
#15 of 34 Old 01-10-2008, 02:18 PM
 
NatureMama3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Catching life's curveballs
Posts: 5,741
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I don't think hemorrhage is unpredictable. In the case of my former OB it was the woman's 8th child and she had a history of it. Obviously her first hemorrhage was not fatal (nor those after) and were warning beacons. What I don't know is was the child induced? was pitocin used? was the placenta taken out by traction? was the mother exhausted due to no food during labor? Those are hospital-born risks that can make a tendency to hemorrhage worse.

I agree that hemorrhage and more severe hemorrhage ARE more common in hospital settings. The natural path of birth is not respected and the natural safeguards (letting placenta come on its own, nursing immediately, etc) thrown out.
NatureMama3 is offline  
#16 of 34 Old 01-10-2008, 03:39 PM
 
barefootpoetry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,676
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hoo boy, if hemorrage was a five-minutes-and-you're-dead deal, I wouldn't be here typing this right now. I would have been gone before I even hung up the phone with 911. Nevermind the hours it took them in the ER to even locate the source of all the blood, start a transfusion, and then send me to the OR to have my cervix stitched. What a crock.

Nasty scaremongering, nasty nasty nasty. It speaks volumes about his character that instead of offering reasons why the hospital is more safe, he flails out with lies about why homebirth/UC is horrible and deadly and no one in their right mind would do it.
barefootpoetry is offline  
#17 of 34 Old 01-10-2008, 03:54 PM
 
Kidzaplenty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Writing my Happily Ever After
Posts: 16,983
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Testifyer View Post
I thought most proponents for UC and home birth say birth is safe....
It's not that I, as a UCer say "birth is safe", it is that "Birth is AS safe or SAFER" at home than in a hospital setting.

Birth is a process and it does have natural risks, but so does everything in life. Us who advocate for UC and HB would not say birth is "Safe" at home with no potential for problems or bad outcomes. What we would say is that birth is natural and has been happening for thousands of year and though there are inherent risks to giving birth, the natural body can cope with most of those if given the chance. However, the hospital staff routinely force the body to stop it's natural processes in order for them to force it to do what they want it to do in their time table. This causes the natural coping mechanisms in the body to stand back and say, "Have it your way, I quit!" That is where many of the complications come in.

I think the worldwide statistics of birth speak for themselves. With the US being second from the bottom.

Any misspellings or grammatical errors in the above statement are intentional;
they are placed there for the amusement of those who like to point them out.
Kidzaplenty is offline  
#18 of 34 Old 01-10-2008, 03:57 PM
 
Romana's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 4,365
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by sapphire_chan View Post
"Bleed to death in 5 minutes"

So there are arteries inside the uterus?
I do believe there are - they supply blood to the placenta. If the placenta doesn't detach properly or the uterus doesn't clamp down, the arteries can literally continue pouring blood into the space where the placenta was attached and, as I understand it, women can die very quickly from a hemorrhage. It's not very common, but it can happen.

I have great respect for doctorjen on these forums, and she posted a story about this with one of her clients. As you probably know, she is a super-low-intervention family doc (& doctorjen, I apologize if I make a mistake at all in relating this anecdote). After the woman gave birth, she was just gushing, pouring blood. To save her life, doctorjen did bimanual compression - pretty rough, too - among other things. She did not have time to ask the patient's permission, but I believe she told her what she was doing. The patient did experience some trauma from the event (no surprise there) as it was both painful and frightening. But also necessary to save her life in that moment.

As I understand it, that kind of catastrophic hemorrhage is very unusual. Not impossible, just very unusual. I would think that might be one of the rare situations where a UC could result in a maternal death that could be prevented in the hospital or with an attendant, but also I feel that in a hemorrhage that severe, it might not be possible to save the mother at all.

As someone else said, birth is not without risk. Wherever you do it. A lot of choice in birthing depends on the way you evaulate the risks and what risks are and are not acceptable to you. The risk of severe PPH is so slight that, to me, it does not overpower the many other risks attendant to hospital births.
Romana is offline  
#19 of 34 Old 01-10-2008, 04:28 PM
 
barefoot mama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,528
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Romana9+2 View Post
To save her life, doctorjen did bimanual compression - pretty rough, too - among other things. She did not have time to ask the patient's permission, but I believe she told her what she was doing. The patient did experience some trauma from the event (no surprise there) as it was both painful and frightening. But also necessary to save her life in that moment.
Oh yes, now I remember. In Emergency Childbirth, Dr White talks about that. Compress the uterus with one hand against your other hand, which should be on the cervix. HARD.
barefoot mama is offline  
#20 of 34 Old 01-10-2008, 04:35 PM
 
Romana's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 4,365
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by barefoot mama View Post
Oh yes, now I remember. In Emergency Childbirth, Dr White talks about that. Compress the uterus with one hand against your other hand, which should be on the cervix. HARD.
Yes. One hand goes in the vagina, then becomes a fist. Other hand on the outside and you compress the uterus between them. Sounds very painful. I made sure my dh was aware of this and had looked at the diagrams in the Dr. White book, but honestly I think in that extreme kind of emergency it really is asking a lot of a spouse, who hasn't had any training and doesn't know exactly what to do, and is scared themselves. Fortunately, needing bimanual compression to stop a sudden, severe PPH is very rare. I don't know how rare, statistically . . . and I would think it would be less likely where there's no cord traction or other interference that could cause a hemorrhage.
Romana is offline  
#21 of 34 Old 01-10-2008, 04:51 PM
 
moodymaximus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,177
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by LoveChild421 View Post
What role does having the baby taken away to be "inspected" and given all the routine procedures rather than given to the mother to nurse IMMEDIATELY play? Nursing helps the uterus contract. Nature gives us safeguards.

but many babies don't nurse immediately. DS was at my breast right away, but didn't want to nurse for quite a while.
moodymaximus is offline  
#22 of 34 Old 01-10-2008, 05:26 PM
 
LoveChild421's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: North GA
Posts: 4,593
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by moodymaximus View Post
but many babies don't nurse immediately. DS was at my breast right away, but didn't want to nurse for quite a while.
I think part of it is also the skin to skin contact and the hormones (oxytocin mainly) that are released during mother-child bonding which help the uterus to contract (its synthetic oxytocin (pitocin) after all this is used in hospitals as a matter of routine when delivering the placenta to prevent hemorrage). Nursing helps but I think just having a natural mother-child bonding stage, keeping the mom and baby warm and cozy together, while the placenta is being born and after is so crucial. I don't think oxytocin is released in the same way when you are lying there being stitched up watching people poke and prod your crying baby rather than being bundled up loving on each other.

Jen read.gif Mama of 2 precious boys blowkiss.gif (9)  flowersforyou.gif (6)  and still in heartbeat.gif with my Matt hat.gif after 12 years together. 

rainbow1284.gif Domestic Violence Children's Advocate and Counselor hug2.gif

 homebirth.jpg bf.jpg nocirc.gif ribbonjigsaw.gif 

LoveChild421 is offline  
#23 of 34 Old 01-10-2008, 06:02 PM
 
Gilby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: In my wildest dreams!
Posts: 84
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by LoveChild421 View Post
I think part of it is also the skin to skin contact and the hormones (oxytocin mainly) that are released during mother-child bonding which help the uterus to contract (its synthetic oxytocin (pitocin) after all this is used in hospitals as a matter of routine when delivering the placenta to prevent hemorrage). Nursing helps but I think just having a natural mother-child bonding stage, keeping the mom and baby warm and cozy together, while the placenta is being born and after is so crucial. I don't think oxytocin is released in the same way when you are lying there being stitched up watching people poke and prod your crying baby rather than being bundled up loving on each other.
Yep, it's true. You don't have to actually nurse to receive some of the benefits of the hormones involved in nursing which help prevent hemorrhage. For moms who are trying to relactate, if the baby isn't used to nursing they say to spend as much time with the baby next to your skin and nuzzled at the breast... your body interprets it much the same way. So amazing!
Gilby is offline  
#24 of 34 Old 01-10-2008, 06:07 PM
 
crazy_eights's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Nisht ahir un nish aher
Posts: 6,837
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by NatureMama3 View Post
In all reality women DO die from hemorrhage in the hospital plenty.
I'd love to see some stats to back that up. I've worked L&D for 7 years in a larger city and we hear about maternal deaths, even ones not in the facilities I've worked in. I've yet to hear of one from hemorrhage. Amniotic fluid embolism and other embolisms are the ones that I remember, but again, none from hemorrhage. The one death I've heard of from hemorrhage is one that nurses still talk about and it happend years ago - but it happend in far longer than 5 minutes, it was a c/sec, the mother was in DIC and a Jehovah's Witness that refused transfusion. Definitely not a simple case of "oh, she bled out".
crazy_eights is offline  
#25 of 34 Old 01-10-2008, 06:12 PM
 
crazy_eights's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Nisht ahir un nish aher
Posts: 6,837
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by NatureMama3 View Post
I don't think hemorrhage is unpredictable. In the case of my former OB it was the woman's 8th child and she had a history of it. Obviously her first hemorrhage was not fatal (nor those after) and were warning beacons. What I don't know is was the child induced? was pitocin used? was the placenta taken out by traction? was the mother exhausted due to no food during labor? Those are hospital-born risks that can make a tendency to hemorrhage worse.
She also could have had a genetic issue, such as Von Willebrands, that would have made it much more likely for a hemorrhage. Or weird placental implantation - low lying placental implantation tends to bleed A LOT. The lower uterine segment doesn't contract the same way the upper parts do to act as the "living ligature".
crazy_eights is offline  
#26 of 34 Old 01-10-2008, 06:15 PM
 
crazy_eights's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Nisht ahir un nish aher
Posts: 6,837
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Romana9+2 View Post
I do believe there are - they supply blood to the placenta.
Uterine artery. But no, it's not "in the uterus".
crazy_eights is offline  
#27 of 34 Old 01-10-2008, 06:33 PM
 
crazy_eights's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Nisht ahir un nish aher
Posts: 6,837
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
#
crazy_eights is offline  
#28 of 34 Old 01-10-2008, 07:04 PM
 
Romana's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 4,365
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mom2seven View Post
Uterine artery. But no, it's not "in the uterus".
Ok, then I'm going to google for a quick anatomy lesson, because it was my understanding that blood is supplied directly to the attachment site of the placenta, and if the placenta detaches but the uterus does not contract/blood flow does not stop as it should (or placenta partially detaches) you basically have blood pouring in that space. So, I'm going to go give myself a quick anatomy less to try to make sense of it.
Romana is offline  
#29 of 34 Old 01-10-2008, 07:11 PM
 
Romana's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 4,365
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Maternal placental circulation
The maternal blood enters the intervillous space through endometrial arteries (spiral arteries), 80 to 100 in number. They pierce the decidual plate and then pass through the gaps in cytotrophoblastic shell. As the artery enters, it is under high pressure because it enters through the small gap; this pressure forces the blood deep into intervillous spaces and bathes the villi. Exchange of gases takes place. As the pressure decreases, the deoxygenated blood flows backwards to the decidua and enters the endometrial veins.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Placenta

Oh yeah, that helps.

Wow, and if you keep reading, there's a real swan song in there for active 3rd stage management. Cord traction and all. Yuck.
Romana is offline  
#30 of 34 Old 01-10-2008, 10:12 PM
 
JesseMomme's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: not here anymore
Posts: 8,278
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
oops I was thinking of Ina May : n/m Ok I will GO read the link now :

Ohh I posted in my blog (sig) what I posted in that discussion the other day.
JesseMomme is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off