My OB was suspended---need help! Advise!! - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

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Old 05-07-2008, 02:52 PM
 
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You can become sensitized even if you do everything right. I suspect it's less likely in a natural birth with a physiologic third stage, but of course there's no research either way. You can also become sensitized during pregnancy. This happened to my mom, actually. She wasn't sensitized when the pregnancy began, and some time during pregnancy she became sensitized. My brother was induced at 37 weeks and had significant jaundice that required phototherapy (which can happen because the baby's blood cells are attacked in utero) but luckily was otherwise healthy. This was baby #5 for my mom. She decided to stop having kids after the Rh sensitization, since sensitization can post very significant problems to subsequent babies.
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Old 05-07-2008, 03:15 PM
 
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Wow this thread got heated.

I wanted to say that my understanding of Rhogam is not that it kills blood cells. Rather, it introduces a small amount of the antibody into your body, which satisfies your body's need to have the antibodies within it (and therefore it doesn't produce its own antibodies). Of course it's possible these antibodies do go on to kill cells. Thinking about it I can see how either explanation would lead to the same result - the body doesn't produce antibodies.

I personally, have found the prenatal Rhogam does tend to be really arbitrary (it's only good within a 72 hour time frame). However I believe it's prudent after any "trauma" - an auto accident, amniocentisis, etc.

I personally believe that a mother should choose to have the baby's cord blood typed after birth and if the baby is + it would be prudent to consider Rhogam.

These are *my* beliefs on it. I have never had any prenatal trauma and have never had it during pregnancy, but I have chosen it after all three of my + babies were born (and will do so again if this new babe is positive).

I've written an article on Rhogam which regularly gets me flamed You can read it here.

These are my personal views and opinions, and I've linked a few resources at the end of my article to provide other opinions.

I am interested in this issue and would like to see evidence and documentation on the Rh issues before and after Rhogam (and BayRho and other shots).

And also - the blood transfusion thing mentioned in this thread - you can take Rhogam after a transfusion. I believe it is the same dose given to Rh- women who have had a miscarriage. It's smaller than the postpartum dose and gives protection for the future

Kristen, Loving my family heartbeat.gif Sweet DH, C 11, A 9, B 7, G 4, H 1, C newbie!
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Old 05-08-2008, 07:50 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ThreeBeans View Post
You've intuited your baby's blood type? Fascinating.
i think zoebird was saying her intuition was telling her it wasn't going to be an issue for her and her children. and it won't since she and her dh are both rh positive.
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Old 05-08-2008, 11:36 PM
 
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That's right, Rh+ women and even Rh- women with an Rh- husband (or should I say the father), do not have to worry about incompatibilities.

The only ones that are affected are Rh- women that have an Rh+ baby, but the do take precautions for all Rh- women, just in case.

Personally, I don't go in for all that "just in case" stuff.

Any misspellings or grammatical errors in the above statement are intentional;
they are placed there for the amusement of those who like to point them out.
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Old 05-09-2008, 02:26 AM
 
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Originally Posted by zoebird View Post
reading the link above about thr rhogram shot, it seems to me that if you're having a natural, noninterventive birth, you don't need the shot. it's only if you have interventions (and thus the risk of "blood mixing") that you may need the shot.

so, it seems to me that it's nothing to worry about.

it's odd that i didn't know this factually, but i did know it intuitively. recently, a woman asked me abotu the shot and i said that i felt it wasnt' necessary. she asked if i knew our blood types and all that, and i said that i didn't.

she said that it was necessary. i asked her why, and she brought up a bunch of bogus stuff like "because that's what is done." so, i said "what about before those things were done? did women and babies die from rhogram incompatiability or something? do you know?"

and then i sort of "realized" that it's not at issue. i didn't know why it wasnt' at issue, but i realized that it wasn't an issue. and i just felt good about not worrying about it.

this article gave me some good info to back that up--but it just makes sense. i mean, long before we even knew about blood types, women had babies with different blood types and i'm sure that most of them survived just dandy.

so, i wouldn't be too worried about it and i'd only get it if i went in for interventions anyway.
In reading UC books, etc., a couple of women said that if the placenta comes out naturally, there's no mixing of the baby's blood with the mother's. It's only when a doctor/midwife/etc. pull on the cord to get the placenta out and cut the cord before the baby has gotten all of the blood where there's a chance of the blood mixing. In prenatal books and such, they always (it seems) point out that the baby's blood and the mother's blood never mix. The mother's blood brings the nutrients to the barrier and pass them across without going across themselves and the same with the wastes from the baby. So it makes sense that a placenta that comes out whole, is not "helped" by anyone, and that has given all the baby's blood back to the baby would not allow the baby's blood to mix with the mother. Also, some women have had their rh- change to rh+ I have a book that mentions that. Polly's Birth Book by Polly Block.
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Old 05-09-2008, 02:47 AM
 
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The words below are paraphrased, not a direct quote, as I cannot quote more than 50 words from a book here. Polly Block said that on three different occasions in her midwifery classes, someone told the class that her Rh had changed from - to +. She said that every time it was a doctor, not the mother who caught the change in Rh. Obviously, the doctors were shocked and ordered more tests. Polly Block said that at first she had not taken these seriously and thought that there had been mistakes. But she found out about 6 others and in one of her classes a woman said that she also had - blood but that it had been + for the past 6 years. The thing the women all had in common was that they were purifying and building their blood by changing what they ate.

I don't know if the book is still available. Here is the information I have, if you want to look for it. Polly's Birth Book - Obstetrics for the Home by Polly Block. Hearthspun Publishers, 475 North Third West, American Fork, Utah, 84003 There is no copyright/printing date that I can find and no ISBN number. I've had the book for many years. Apparently the diet she recommends may be a factor in the change in Rh from - to +
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Old 05-09-2008, 03:20 AM
 
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Paraphrasing again, from Unassisted Homebirth, An Act of Love by Lynn M. Griesemer. One of the mothers in the birth stories was Rh- and did a lot of research to find out if she should take the shot. She learned that the mixing of the blood has a better chance of happening in settings where the cord is pulled on to "yank out the placenta" or the cord is clamped before all the fetal blood is circulated back to the baby, "leading to... back up of fetal blood into the mother's circulation." She had taken one test for the antibodies, it was negative, and she had "stopped taking Rhogam after my fifth baby". The lady had had 7 children at the time of the story. The story starts on page 329 of the book.
The same opinion is stated on page 226 of the book.
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