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#61 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 02:22 PM
 
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JR- that is amazing about the vitamin C! Glad to hear you're feeling better.

Mom to DD1 (10/07) and DD2 (3/11)
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#62 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 03:08 PM
 
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Originally Posted by BeantownBaby9 View Post
Is there a way you can get some of your vits from food, or food turned into pills, versus mfg pills? Instead of taking extra folate or folinic, I steam kale, put the steam water, the kale, and 2 pkg of knox in the blender, and make kale jelly. 1 scoop each meal.
Great idea! I had a kale smoothie last night that I wasn't thrilled with. I'm putting the rest of into kale jelly! Can I add other greens, do you think?
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I really hope for you that you do get an answer, but if you don't, there is always a 2nd opinion. If it makes you feel better, the 1st GI at Children's we saw told me I had an eating disorder b/c I was limiting so many foods trying to figure out what was wrong with DS. 2ns GI at MGH confirmed I wasn't crazy and his intestines are bleeding. IgG testing told me what it was. Keep looking, the answer is out there!
I've had thoughts that if an outsider were to look at our behavior, we'd be diagnosed with EDs. It's a conversation I'd like to have with you all, but I'm not sure how to start it...

Quote:
and on the birthday cake, I am making DS's for his birthday, and since I don't think I even want to trial any cake making ingredients in the next 2 months (nice to see baseline for a while before adventuring, right?), I plan on making a cake with fruit and jello. 1st layer watermelon, cut from the center so its a big cake sized circle, then a layer of jello with berries (plain knox, blackcurrant juice, and berries) molded in a springform pan, then a layer of honedew, then cantaloupe, and each layer will have fresh berries going around the edge.
This sounds BEAUTIFUL. What a wonderful idea for a party cake! Much more festive and yummy than the grocery store cake most people serve (and are expecting) at birthday parties.

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and one more Q.....I am loosing weight, despite eating 5 meals, and giant steaks with tons of fat all the time. I haven't been this thin since jr high. 138lb on 5'9" frame, not good. I can't open jars anymore. Should I ask my doc or OB for a CBC, cholestorol, and full thyroid panel just to make sure I am ok...or is this just a function of BFing and no grains b/c of ED?
I had a full panel run a few weeks ago because of the same concerns (5'7" and 109 lbs., and I can't open jars, either!) The only thing out of normal range was my vit. D, which I am now supplementing.

DS, 10/07. Allergies: peanut, egg, wheat. We've added dairy back in. And taken it back out again. It causes sandpaper skin with itchy patches and thrashing during sleep. Due w/ #2 late April, 2012.

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#63 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 03:11 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Huh, I must have missed that link before.

The Pfeiffer over vs under methylated stuff talk about undermethylated people having seasonal allergies while overmethylated people have food and chemical sensitivities. Not that I agree with most of what Pfeiffer says about methylation, but maybe there's something there? I wonder if it has to do with CBS upregulations? Actually, I'm kind of really curious about that as well, because I can't come up with a good reason why I *don't* have a metal problem (which is part of why I always say I'm just assuming).

Hmm... I wonder if it has to do with folate consumption? Maybe your dh was eating a whole lot more food folate than you? I've always really liked beans...

Dh just got his MTHFR gene and homocysteine levels checked. We don't have the results yet. I'm REALLY curious, because he's the classic low methyl groups - mystery seasonal type allergies, crazy allergic to cats, definitely high dopamine, migraines, etc... And no mercury fillings. I'm hoping he'll provide another big clue to the whole mess
I think I've been misinterpreting Pfeiffer's over vs undermethylated. Do you think that's not the same as being low or high in methyl groups, but it's our body's tendency, in how it works. I mean--maybe I will always be undermethylated even when I'm caught up in my methylation, because the way my body breaks leads to seasonal allergies, etc etc. What I mean is, it's something else exerting pressure on my methylation and the way it compensates is different. I've wondered about the CBS upregulation thing before, I don't think it's my issue, but maybe it is an issue for the overmethylators.

I don't think it was diet, DH's family wasn't huge on green veggies (and for being Hispanic, they rarely ate beans). Some, yeah, but not a shocking difference. And frankly, his body is pretty darn worn down right now, and he still doesn't have any allergy symptoms, either seasons stuff or anything like hives/ana-type stuff or weird reactions to chemicals, no one in his family does (and you can bet it's not because of their excellent nutrition and avoidance of environmental toxins). I think he may have a slew of IgG reactions due to leaky gut, but not straightforward symptoms.

I'm wondering if the people who aren't either overmethylators or undermethylators have a different prioritization in their bodies for their nutrients. I mean--I think his gut is really leaky, but I think his detoxification pathways would be fairly okay, though I think they're dealing with a lot of partial proteins from his gut and maybe bogged down temporarily. For me, it is weird that although I have lots of low zinc symptoms, I think my body has prioritized zinc for digestion, so I became hypothyroid and zinc sulfate tasted like water, but my digestion was pretty okay.

Will be waiting with baited breath to hear the results.

Oh--and I hope the migraine/folate stuff actually helps people, now that MtnMama linked that article, I've recently talked to two people and they've brought up their migraines, and I'm like, can I forward you a study? Maybe this would help?

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Originally Posted by BeantownBaby9 View Post
and one more Q.....I am loosing weight, despite eating 5 meals, and giant steaks with tons of fat all the time. I haven't been this thin since jr high. 138lb on 5'9" frame, not good. I can't open jars anymore. Should I ask my doc or OB for a CBC, cholestorol, and full thyroid panel just to make sure I am ok...or is this just a function of BFing and no grains b/c of ED?
Do you have any safe starchy veggies, like potatoes or maybe sweet potatoes or carrots? Not sure if that would be enough, but maybe really upping that.

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DD's appt was cancelled. The ND's kids are sick. They offered an appt with the nurse practitioner (it's a homeopathic clinic) but I'm holding out for the ND although I really don't know enough about their training to know for sure who is the right person. So we're postponed by a week. I hate waiting - it feels like I'm wasting time and doing nothing helpful for dd and ds2.
Bummer on the cancellation, that is always so disappointing. But seriously, NO ONE on this board should think (except for a nanosecond) that they're not helping their kids.

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I am shocked, seriously- shocked! with how much better I feel today over the last couple of days. I don't hurt as much and I'm not as moody/irritable (yet anyway The day's still young). Nice to know the vitamin C's doing something, even if it sucks to know that I'm going to be relying on it for it's mood stabilizing effects.

Wow. That was a rant. Sorry.
I always make it work in my head by reminding myself that the kids and I, when our bodies feel better, we are nicer and happier and we behave better. So working on our health makes _everything_ better! And feel free to rant.
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#64 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 03:30 PM
 
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BeantownBaby9

Wow. I just clicked on your blog link. You look like a beautiful version of my long lost twin. (at least, the one pic at the top) And I'm totally jealous of the lobster...
(does lobster travel? My aunt and uncle are visiting from greater Boston in late May...)

DS, 10/07. Allergies: peanut, egg, wheat. We've added dairy back in. And taken it back out again. It causes sandpaper skin with itchy patches and thrashing during sleep. Due w/ #2 late April, 2012.

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#65 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 04:05 PM
 
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Can I ask how and how much for the testing? I think I want to get this done for me, to help figure out where I am as a methylator
I get my testing through our family practice doc, and so far, it's all been covered by insurance. The MTHFR test was about $1000 though :
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JR- that is amazing about the vitamin C! Glad to hear you're feeling better.
Adrenals need vitamin C, but I don't know why. I wonder if you're seeing adrenal support?

allergy-nutrition mama, dh, 4yo dd, and March ds
Eating shouldn't be stressful!
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#66 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 04:21 PM
 
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I think I've been misinterpreting Pfeiffer's over vs undermethylated. Do you think that's not the same as being low or high in methyl groups, but it's our body's tendency, in how it works. I mean--maybe I will always be undermethylated even when I'm caught up in my methylation, because the way my body breaks leads to seasonal allergies, etc etc. What I mean is, it's something else exerting pressure on my methylation and the way it compensates is different. I've wondered about the CBS upregulation thing before, I don't think it's my issue, but maybe it is an issue for the overmethylators.
The reason I don't like the Pfeiffer methylation stuff is because they say to avoid folate/B12, since those will increase dopamine and histamine. I think they're way off there.

I'm thinking undermethylated is clear - you need more methyl groups. But overmethylated seems harder, that it's not that you have too many methyl groups, per se, it's that you don't have enough to detox with them. Like maybe you're not making *enough* estrogen or histamine or other of the millions of things methyl groups are used for, so you end up with methyl groups to spare.

It seems like a person would have a genetic tendency towards one end or the other, but that a healthy person wouldn't have any issues at all?

allergy-nutrition mama, dh, 4yo dd, and March ds
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#67 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 04:25 PM
 
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Originally Posted by waluso View Post
- eggs
- quinoa flour
- baking soda
- tapioca flour/starch
- vanilla
- maybe guar gum (haven't trialed it but so far we have been good with legumes)
- lemon juice
- squash/carrots/zucchini
- cacao
- maple syrup/maple sugar/honey/dates/date sugar/date syrup

I found a chocolate syrup made with organice cacao and organic agave that is awesome and I think would make a good icing (it is fairly thick). I am thinking a vanilla cake would be good with the chocolate syrup as icing. But I want to decorate it so I need some kind of white icing for that I guess. I am not a good baker so will take any help I can get! And I don't have a lot of time for trial runs. Any suggestions?
I have a GF carrot cake recipe that is fabulous and should work great with the ingredients you can use. I used garbanzo bean flour for mine, but I've used quinoa flour pretty much interchangeably for that without a problem. I'll try to dig up the recipe and post it this afternoon.

[

<>< Alison
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#68 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 04:43 PM
 
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drive by... busy and really trying to give DD1 lots of one-on-one attention (stole a moment while she was in the potty, )...

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The Pfeiffer over vs under methylated stuff talk about undermethylated people having seasonal allergies while overmethylated people have food and chemical sensitivities.
I'm stumped by this b/c i have seasonal allergies AND food sensitivities. I'm fairly certain i'm undermethylated, though...

JR - glad the C is helping.

Everyone else, know that I'm reading and thinking of you all. Learning a lot and very much appreciating the support.

G2G, DD1 is out of the potty and DD2 just woke up from her nap...

Nessa, DD1 (5) DD2 (3) & expecting again in late February/early March!
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#69 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 04:48 PM
 
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I'm stumped by this b/c i have seasonal allergies AND food sensitivities. I'm fairly certain i'm undermethylated, though...
Me too.

Mom to DD1 (10/07) and DD2 (3/11)
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#70 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 05:10 PM
 
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Adrenals need vitamin C, but I don't know why. I wonder if you're seeing adrenal support?
That's what I was thinking. It might be partly due to helping to recycle glutathione maybe? Or maybe just antioxidant support?
I know that the adrenals are one of the biggest storage places for vitamin C in our bodies... Can't remember where I read that.

Wife of Michael , SAHM to Aristotle 09/99 Raphael 06/07 and Marius 05/09 Known only in dreams but never forgotten: Euphrates Decluttering 290/2010
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#71 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 05:14 PM
 
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Me too.
Me and DS and DD2 too (environmental allergies AND food intolerances, though not food allergies).

Kathy, mother of 3, wife of 1. My new recipe blog: www.kathysrecipebox.wordpress.com (no longer searchable by allergen, but at least it doesn't have a virus!)
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#72 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 06:10 PM
 
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Me and DS and DD2 too (environmental allergies AND food intolerances, though not food allergies).
Yeah. I don't give a lot of weight to Pfeiffer. Maybe we should just ignore that part too

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#73 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 06:20 PM
 
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whoMe's detox puzzle page, here ... mentions seasonal allergies being related to being low in methyl groups.

Seasonal and environmental allergies are IgE reactions, right? Which is why they use that skin prick test? Does it make sense that IgE reactions to foods as well are related to methylation? Am I overreaching, or making bad baseline assumptions?

:You are brilliant! I hadn't thought of this connection. (makes sense to me!)


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#74 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 06:28 PM
 
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A bit of cynic blood today, when I saw this quote
Quote:
DD's appt was canceled. The ND's kids are sick. They offered an appt with the nurse practitioner (it's a homeopathic clinic) but I'm holding out for the ND although I really don't know enough about their training to know for sure who is the right person. So we're postponed by a week. I hate waiting - it feels like I'm wasting time and doing nothing helpful for dd and ds2.
You are doing something by researching, learning, observing and discovering your own path. Doesn't sound like the ND has it figured out for his kids either.

We *don't* get sick on classical homeopathy. Seriously, unless we are antidoted, we get a sniffle for less than 24 hours. I'm wondering if the ND practices acute homeopathy or classical homeopathy. Either way, the kids ought to feel well, ime!


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#75 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 06:38 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I've just been assuming that the "allergies" means only IgE since I doubt he was either measuring IgG or looking for the type of reactions we all have.

I'm going to go off and read about Pfeiffer, cause, MyLittleWonders, for example--didn't you think the overmethylated stuff fit you? Except you were taking something called MethylMax, so I assume that was methylation support. I was assuming that, for example, overmethylated people put too many resources into making methyl groups (maybe their bodies are using those methyl groups in some compensatory way, sorta like my son maybe using up extra A to compensate for being low in methyl groups), maybe at the expense of something else, but can still get behind due to excess toxic load and then there's a bigger gap between what their bodies want and what they're actually able to make vs the undermethylated people, so they get more serious reactions (as a generalization, since some folks can have horrible, horrible seasonal allergies). But if he was actually treating people by limiting folate and B12, well, that seems weird. Need to think.
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#76 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 06:46 PM
 
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I confess, I'm reading backwards.

I'm going to post our classical homeopath's contact info for anyone who wants a professional consult. She is quite gifted. And has essentially cured dh's asthma and allergies. She is agreeable to do phone consults. But, if you are within 100 miles, it is preferable to see her in person (with baby), at least once.

Naomi Zeskind, Classical Homeopathic Educator
1515 Mockingbird Lane, Suite 530 in Charlotte, NC 28209
704-553-1811

The initial consult is about three hours and costs about $300, which includes the remedy. She requests one follow-up at six weeks, which costs about another $90.


Pat (I get nothing for the referral, lol. But, she does do presentations for our holistic group for free.) I'm just evangelical about classical homeopathy!! :

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#77 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 06:49 PM
 
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Originally Posted by TanyaLopez View Post
I've just been assuming that the "allergies" means only IgE since I doubt he was either measuring IgG or looking for the type of reactions we all have.

I'm going to go off and read about Pfeiffer, cause, MyLittleWonders, for example--didn't you think the overmethylated stuff fit you? Except you were taking something called MethylMax, so I assume that was methylation support. I was assuming that, for example, overmethylated people put too many resources into making methyl groups (maybe their bodies are using those methyl groups in some compensatory way, sorta like my son maybe using up extra A to compensate for being low in methyl groups), maybe at the expense of something else, but can still get behind due to excess toxic load and then there's a bigger gap between what their bodies want and what they're actually able to make vs the undermethylated people, so they get more serious reactions (as a generalization, since some folks can have horrible, horrible seasonal allergies). But if he was actually treating people by limiting folate and B12, well, that seems weird. Need to think.
I came across this website one day, and from it, I undermethylate. Here is another site that talks about undermethylated people and characteristics.

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#78 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 06:59 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I have a feeling my theory is cr@p.... darn. And how weird to limit B12/folate. Just weird.

Okay, weird. That says undermethylators may need to avoid folic acid, and overmethylators need more folic acid and B12 (I'm going to read "folate" instead of "folic acid").

I wonder, my grandma had bad reactions to all the anti-depressants she tried, it looks like it pushed her into some of those overmethylation symptoms when she normally didn't have them. Figuring this stuff out could help so much (though I'm hoping to avoid meds, barring serious injuries, for the rest of my life, we'll see how that goes).
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#79 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 07:00 PM
 
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This is another, albeit short, article: The link between adrenal fatigue and DNA mmethylation. The article is only the first page; the other 2 are bibliography.

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#80 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 07:16 PM
 
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I came across this website one day, and from it, I undermethylate. Here is another site that talks about undermethylated people and characteristics.
From the first link:

Undermethylation: This condition is innate & is characterized by low levels of serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine, high whole blood histamine and elevated absolute basophils. This population has a high incidence of seasonal allergies, OCD tendencies, perfectionism, high libido, sparse body hair, and several other characteristics. They usually respond well to methionine, SAMe, calcium, magnesium, omega-3 essential oils (DHA & EPA), B-6, inositol, and vitamins A, C, and E. They should avoid supplements containing folic acid. In severe cases involving psychosis, the dominant symptom is usually delusional thinking rather than hallucinations. They tend to speak very little & may sit motionless for extended periods. They may appear outwardly calm, but suffer from extreme internal anxiety.

Overmethylation: This condition is the biochemical opposite of undermethylation. It is characterized by elevated levels of serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine, low whole blood histamine, and low absolute basophils. This population is characterized by the following typical symptoms: Absence of seasonal, inhalent allergies, but a multitude of chemical or food sensitivities, high anxiety which is evident to all, low libido, obsessions but not compulsions, tendency for paranoia and auditory hallucinations, underachievement as a child, heavy body hair, hyperactivity, "nervous" legs, and grandiosity. They usually respond well to folic acid, B-12, niacinamide, DMAE, choline, manganese, zinc, omega-3 essential oils (DHA and EPA) and vitamins C and E, but should avoid supplements of methionine, SAMe, inositol, TMG and DMG.

So does that mean neither or both? I thought I was going to be one or the other, but apparently not.

I got root beer candy from www.naturalcandystore.com when I was getting more peppermint patty candies for DS for a treat when he finishes swim lessons on Friday. It's so nice to be able to have candy again. I don't feel so bad about missing chocolate now....

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#81 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 07:22 PM
 
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Thanks everyone for the cake ideas! I am going to try some things next weekend.

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Originally Posted by kjbrown92 View Post
From the first link:

Undermethylation: This condition is innate & is characterized by low levels of serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine, high whole blood histamine and elevated absolute basophils. This population has a high incidence of seasonal allergies, OCD tendencies, perfectionism, high libido, sparse body hair, and several other characteristics. They usually respond well to methionine, SAMe, calcium, magnesium, omega-3 essential oils (DHA & EPA), B-6, inositol, and vitamins A, C, and E. They should avoid supplements containing folic acid. In severe cases involving psychosis, the dominant symptom is usually delusional thinking rather than hallucinations. They tend to speak very little & may sit motionless for extended periods. They may appear outwardly calm, but suffer from extreme internal anxiety.

Overmethylation: This condition is the biochemical opposite of undermethylation. It is characterized by elevated levels of serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine, low whole blood histamine, and low absolute basophils. This population is characterized by the following typical symptoms: Absence of seasonal, inhalent allergies, but a multitude of chemical or food sensitivities, high anxiety which is evident to all, low libido, obsessions but not compulsions, tendency for paranoia and auditory hallucinations, underachievement as a child, heavy body hair, hyperactivity, "nervous" legs, and grandiosity. They usually respond well to folic acid, B-12, niacinamide, DMAE, choline, manganese, zinc, omega-3 essential oils (DHA and EPA) and vitamins C and E, but should avoid supplements of methionine, SAMe, inositol, TMG and DMG.

So does that mean neither or both? I thought I was going to be one or the other, but apparently not.
Kathy - I have almost identical symptoms as you. I always thought I was undermethylated but not sure now. I have no idea how to interpret this.
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#82 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 07:24 PM
 
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This study compares the side-effects of epijr with epipen for mid-range sized children. Basically, it advises that smaller increments of dosing has fewer significant side effects.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11428733
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/15025402
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/11428733


According to AAP News, "Therefore, further studies should be done to clarify the use of EpiPen and EpiPen Jr. in infants and young children."

Quote:
Abstract

Background: Little information is available about administration of an accurate epinephrine dose to infants experiencing anaphylaxis outside the hospital setting.

Objective: Our purpose was to perform a prospective, controlled study of (1) the time needed by parents to draw up an infant epinephrine dose from an ampule and (2) the dose accuracy.

Methods: We gave 18 parents written instructions and asked them to draw up epinephrine 0.09 mL. We timed them by means of a stopwatch and measured the epinephrine content (in micrograms) in each dose by using HPLC-UV. Eighteen resident physicians, 18 general duty nurses, and 18 emergency department nurses served as controls.

Results: The parents took significantly longer (P < .05) than the controls to draw up the dose; the mean (± SEM) times were 142 ± 13 seconds (range, 83-248) for the parents, 52 ± 3 seconds (range, 30-83) for the physicians, 40 ± 2 seconds (range, 26-71) for the general duty nurses, and 29 ± 0.09 seconds (range, 27-33) for the emergency department nurses. The control groups did not differ significantly from each other in speed (P > .05). The epinephrine content of the doses drawn up by the parents ranged 40-fold in contrast to the physicians' doses (7- to 8-fold), general duty nurses' doses (3-fold), and emergency department nurses' doses (2-fold). The mean epinephrine content did not differ significantly (P > .05) among the 4 groups.

Conclusions: Most parents were unable to draw up an infant epinephrine dose rapidly or accurately. Most health care professionals drew up the dose rapidly; however, their accuracy was compromised by inherent variations of epinephrine concentrations in the ampules (United States Pharmacopeia compendial limits, 90% to 115%) and the inherent difficulty of measuring low volumes (<0.1 mL) of epinephrine. User-friendly premeasured epinephrine doses suitable for infants should be developed. (J Allergy Clin Immunol 2001;108:1040-4.)
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retri...91674901072931


Safety issues

The potential harms of anaphylaxis almost always outweigh the potential harms of giving adrenaline.1
Advise consumers about adrenaline’s short shelf life, the need to check and record expiry dates, and to replace their EpiPen before expiry.


EpiPen should be stored below 77°F and protected from light. In hotter areas where this may be difficult, a portable cooler could be used. Refrigeration is not advised, as the effect on stability is not certain. Regular checking for discolouration can help detect decay of the adrenaline, but this is not an absolute indicator if recommended temperatures are exceeded.
http://www.nps.org.au/health_professionals/publications/nps_radar/issues/current/august_2006/epipen


EpiPen is manufactured byDey L.P.
MANUFACTURED FOR DEY®, NAPA, CALIFORNIA 94558, U.S.A.
by Meridian Medical Technologies, Inc., a subsidiary of
King Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Columbia, MD 21046, U.S.A.
Contact us at 1-800-755-5560 or visit us at www.epipen.com


Twinject is a registered trademark of Sciele Pharma, Inc.
© 2008 Sciele Pharma, Inc.
Five Concourse Parkway Suite 1800
Atlanta, Georgia 30328
Phone: (800) 461-3696


Also, Twinjet manufactures a competitive product and may be motivated to produce an infant version. http://www.twinject.com/ The Twinject usually has a shelf life of about 12 months. EpiPen usually has a shelf life of 20 months. If unused, the EpiPen should be discarded by returning it to a local pharmacy or hospital for safe disposal.

Prefilled syringes could be drawn up. However, the useful life is uncertain.

The Anaphylaxis Campaign may be influential at getting a smaller infant dose manufactured.
http://www.anaphylaxis.org.uk/sitemap.aspx


Give 'em an earful ladies.



Pat









I have a blog.
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#83 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 07:25 PM
 
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Originally Posted by kjbrown92 View Post
From the first link:

Undermethylation: This condition is innate & is characterized by low levels of serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine, high whole blood histamine and elevated absolute basophils. This population has a high incidence of seasonal allergies, OCD tendencies, perfectionism, high libido, sparse body hair, and several other characteristics. They usually respond well to methionine, SAMe, calcium, magnesium, omega-3 essential oils (DHA & EPA), B-6, inositol, and vitamins A, C, and E. They should avoid supplements containing folic acid. In severe cases involving psychosis, the dominant symptom is usually delusional thinking rather than hallucinations. They tend to speak very little & may sit motionless for extended periods. They may appear outwardly calm, but suffer from extreme internal anxiety.

Overmethylation: This condition is the biochemical opposite of undermethylation. It is characterized by elevated levels of serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine, low whole blood histamine, and low absolute basophils. This population is characterized by the following typical symptoms: Absence of seasonal, inhalent allergies, but a multitude of chemical or food sensitivities, high anxiety which is evident to all, low libido, obsessions but not compulsions, tendency for paranoia and auditory hallucinations, underachievement as a child, heavy body hair, hyperactivity, "nervous" legs, and grandiosity. They usually respond well to folic acid, B-12, niacinamide, DMAE, choline, manganese, zinc, omega-3 essential oils (DHA and EPA) and vitamins C and E, but should avoid supplements of methionine, SAMe, inositol, TMG and DMG.

So does that mean neither or both? I thought I was going to be one or the other, but apparently not.

I got root beer candy from www.naturalcandystore.com when I was getting more peppermint patty candies for DS for a treat when he finishes swim lessons on Friday. It's so nice to be able to have candy again. I don't feel so bad about missing chocolate now....
I understand what you are saying - though I am mostly under the undermethylated umbrella, I do exhibit a few of the overmethylated characteristics: chemical sensitivities (and I think food sensitivities though I've only cut gluten), low libido, nervous legs. The thing with the nervous legs gets me though because on one of the links I posted, it also linked overmethylation with high dopamine, but nervous/restless legs is associated with low dopamine, so to me it would make more sense that nervous legs/restless legs would be an undermethylated issue.

 Me + dh = heartbeat.gif ds (7/01), ds (11/03), ds (6/06)
and dd born 11/21/10 - our T21 SuperBaby ribbluyel.gif heartbeat.gif
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#84 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 07:33 PM
 
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Originally Posted by MyLittleWonders View Post
I came across this website one day, and from it, I undermethylate. Here is another site that talks about undermethylated people and characteristics.
Yeah, see those kinds of lists are exactly why I'm ignoring all overmethylator/undermethylator stuff, and anything that mentions Pfeiffer. (the root of the confusion?) Because they're mixing together dopamine, serotonin and histamine symptoms, the sites don't agree with each other, and the symptoms don't agree with what I've read elsewhere. And when I went and looked it up, there's not exactly an issue with *too much* serotonin. We WANT high serotonin.

So I choose to pretend it they don't exist, and talk about being low or high in methyl groups instead.

allergy-nutrition mama, dh, 4yo dd, and March ds
Eating shouldn't be stressful!
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#85 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 07:48 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Okay, I guess I missed this from other discussions, are there really people with more methyl groups than they need?
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#86 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 07:52 PM
 
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Originally Posted by TanyaLopez View Post
Okay, I guess I missed this from other discussions, are there really people with more methyl groups than they need?
I don't know if we discussed it or not. I'm wondering the same thing, as I'm getting pretty high amounts of folate right now. There was one thing that linked too much folic acid during pregnancy to asthma and eczema in kids. I want to find the actual study, to see if the effect was likely just a folic acid vs folate one. Seeing as I'm likely to get pg pretty soon here, we're at high risk for allergies, and I'd like to keep up the folate.

allergy-nutrition mama, dh, 4yo dd, and March ds
Eating shouldn't be stressful!
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#87 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 08:10 PM
 
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Originally Posted by MyLittleWonders View Post
I came across this website one day, and from it, I undermethylate. Here is another site that talks about undermethylated people and characteristics.
Hmmm, I read the first link and I fall under both categories to some extent...lol.
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#88 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 08:10 PM
 
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darn. yes, you can overmethylate:
http://www.jci.org/articles/view/34378

allergy-nutrition mama, dh, 4yo dd, and March ds
Eating shouldn't be stressful!
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#89 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 08:15 PM
 
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Originally Posted by WuWei View Post
This study compares the side-effects of epijr with epipen for mid-range sized children. Basically, it advises that smaller increments of dosing has fewer significant side effects.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11428733
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/15025402
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/11428733


According to AAP News, "Therefore, further studies should be done to clarify the use of EpiPen and EpiPen Jr. in infants and young children."

http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retri...91674901072931


Safety issues

The potential harms of anaphylaxis almost always outweigh the potential harms of giving adrenaline.1
Advise consumers about adrenaline’s short shelf life, the need to check and record expiry dates, and to replace their EpiPen before expiry.


EpiPen should be stored below 77°F and protected from light. In hotter areas where this may be difficult, a portable cooler could be used. Refrigeration is not advised, as the effect on stability is not certain. Regular checking for discolouration can help detect decay of the adrenaline, but this is not an absolute indicator if recommended temperatures are exceeded.
http://www.nps.org.au/health_professionals/publications/nps_radar/issues/current/august_2006/epipen


EpiPen is manufactured byDey L.P.
MANUFACTURED FOR DEY®, NAPA, CALIFORNIA 94558, U.S.A.
by Meridian Medical Technologies, Inc., a subsidiary of
King Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Columbia, MD 21046, U.S.A.
Contact us at 1-800-755-5560 or visit us at www.epipen.com


Twinject is a registered trademark of Sciele Pharma, Inc.
© 2008 Sciele Pharma, Inc.
Five Concourse Parkway Suite 1800
Atlanta, Georgia 30328
Phone: (800) 461-3696


Also, Twinjet manufactures a competitive product and may be motivated to produce an infant version. http://www.twinject.com/ The Twinject usually has a shelf life of about 12 months. EpiPen usually has a shelf life of 20 months. If unused, the EpiPen should be discarded by returning it to a local pharmacy or hospital for safe disposal.

Prefilled syringes could be drawn up. However, the useful life is uncertain.

The Anaphylaxis Campaign may be influential at getting a smaller infant dose manufactured.
http://www.anaphylaxis.org.uk/sitemap.aspx


Give 'em an earful ladies.



Pat









Thank you so much for all of this. I will definately be saying something.
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#90 of 359 Old 05-11-2009, 09:13 PM
 
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So, wise mamas.... I've noticed in the last couple days that I am covered in bruises all of a sudden. I haven't been doing anything out of the ordinary... I just finished AF, so maybe it's related to that (hormonal? nutrient deficiency?)? I was also grain free this week- maybe a nutritional deficiency related to that? Any thoughts?

I'm also having serious digestive upset today. I started buckwheat again last night, had a glass of red wine last night, and drank some water kefir last night and this morning (I haven't had any in over a month.) So now I'm trying to figure out which one is messing with me, or if it's all three. I really want to get kefir back into my diet, so I hope it's not that. But I'm afraid it might be, because I've suspected it before.

I had an appointment with my homeopath today, and he's mailing me a new remedy to try. Let's hope it gets here soon and helps me out!!

(And on the house front... in case anyone is wondering... we just got outbid on ANOTHER house. grrrrrrr. I am getting so tired of this.)

Mom to DD1 (10/07) and DD2 (3/11)
geek.gif I blog about our life with food allergies and eosinophilic disorders.
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