Foods most likely to cause behavioral problems - Mothering Forums

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Old 09-23-2009, 05:20 PM - Thread Starter
 
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We've recently discovered that dairy products make ds1 just plain angry. We eliminated it, and he's his usual sweet self again. Now I'm wondering if ds2 has some behavioral issues caused by food. He doesn't get nuts, milk, or eggs because of allergies. What other foods are most likely to cause behavioral problems?
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Old 09-23-2009, 07:02 PM
 
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In our house, salicylates (highest in fruit, apples and berries in particular). Gluten also. But I think lots of foods can have behavioral reactions - are you food journaling to see if you can see a pattern?

Also, lots of nutrient deficiencies can have behavioral impacts (low magnesium is a big one). What kinds of behaviors are you seeing?

Pick battles big enough to matter, small enough to win. ~Jonathan Kozel
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Old 09-24-2009, 09:26 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I haven't been journalling, but it's a good idea. Here's just a brief background--ds has had some ongoing medical issues that we thought were related to his unusual RAST scores (showing that he creates some level of IgE to virtually all foods). He was on an extremely restricted diet for a few months, eating anywhere from one to a maximum of four foods--not nutritionally balanced at all (no protein source, little fat, and I'm sure woefully deficient in a variety of nutrients).

Fast forward to last week when we got the medical issue resolved and opened up his diet to include everything except his allergens. While he's now sleeping, his temper is really really extreme. He's only 18 months and he goes into these rages that last 30 minutes. Nothing distracts him or calms him down.

There seems to be a definite connection between when the rages started and when his other problem was resolved. Such a mystery why he's feeling better and developed such a temper (he's a happy kid when he's not in a rage). For the first time in his life, he's sleeping normally so perhaps his brain is going through some chemical changes or making new connections? Or perhaps one of his many "new" foods is causing some behavioral problems?
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Old 09-24-2009, 09:50 AM
 
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sugar can do that to kids (and high carbs in general) and soy produces massive tantrums for my DS for 10 days after ingesting it. Keep a food journal.

Kathy, mother of 3, wife of 1. My new recipe blog: www.kathysrecipebox.wordpress.com (no longer searchable by allergen, but at least it doesn't have a virus!)
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Old 09-24-2009, 10:22 AM
 
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Food colorings, preservatives, dyes, salicylates, gluten and dairy. Feingold has extensive research about colorings, preservatives and dyes causing behavior reactions. However, it does not restrict sugar at all- although they have found some kids have behavior reactions to corn syrup. However, as well if a kid is not getting a balanced meal and lots of sugar is crashing their blood sugar it stands to reason it could play a part.

Happily Married to my : 11 yrs- Mama to wild-eyed monkey boy 7-04, fiery little girl 4-07, and the happy smiley baby that sleeps 11-09!
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Old 09-24-2009, 03:29 PM
 
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I'd imagine his system is in utter turmoil after such a restricted diet. I'd get him on a really good multi and mineral supplement (give the minerals separately for better absorption, and try to eat small portions of everything (so no pints of blueberries, LOL). Journal, and see if you can make some sense of the rages, but also give his body time to get adjusted.

Perhaps also try some digestive enzymes? That might help support his body while he gets used to so much new food again.

Pick battles big enough to matter, small enough to win. ~Jonathan Kozel
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