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#1 of 31 Old 09-28-2010, 07:43 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Hi...

My DS is 12 months old. I had no reason to think that DS had any risk factors for food allergies. My husband and I and our families are pretty free and clear in that area.

I gave him a little taste of peanut butter because I was eating some and he seemed interested. Within a few minutes he had some hives on his face where the peanut butter had touched around his mouth and things. He wasn't having any breathing problems and it was nap time, so I put him down for an hour and a half.

When he woke up, the hives had spread to his thighs and stomach. They kept spreading, gradually. They went up into his arm pits and onto his neck and back. The hives merged together into a splotchy red, raised area.

He never started coughing or anything like that. But I'm concerned about the hives all over his body.

I have no experience with food allergies of any kind. How bad is this allergy? Would this be considered a "severe" reaction for a first time trying it? Should I get him allergy tested at the doctors? Should I have some medicine on hand just in case he comes in contact with it again?

I don't want to be paranoid about it, but I don't want to have a worse reaction and not be prepared to handle it either. If anyone could share some info, I'd appreciate it!

TIA

PS He's still mostly breastfed. I'd say like 90% breastfed. I do let him try whatever we're eating as long as it's not very processed and has only one or a few ingredients.
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#2 of 31 Old 09-28-2010, 07:51 PM
 
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Sounds pretty bad. I would at the very least call your doctor and see what they recommend. If it doesn't get better or it gets any worse I'd go to the ER.

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#3 of 31 Old 09-28-2010, 08:37 PM
 
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I would say that is a reaction.

My daughter is nut allergic and we found out in a very similar way. She was 13 months old (about) and I gave her a bite of peanut butter toast. Her face (mostly around her mouth and nose) got red with raised bumps and her lips swelled. She now has an epipen we are very careful about what she eats. She also has some sensitivity to sesame seeds so you may want to look out for those as well.

The doctor will be able to run a full battery of allergy tests to determine what is good and what is not so good for your little one.

Good luck!

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#4 of 31 Old 09-28-2010, 08:42 PM
 
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Sounds like the first exposures my DD had. I did not take the warning as seriously as I should have. It would have helped to have an epi-pen when she had an exposure to PB that resulted in a serious reaction. I strongly recommend you contact MD and get an epi-pen. Benadryl would help with the hives.
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#5 of 31 Old 09-28-2010, 09:22 PM
 
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In addition to the suggestions posted above, I recommend checking out http://www.foodallergy.org

It would also be a good idea to talk to your doctor about an emergency action plan http://www.foodallergy.org/files/FAAP.pdf Having a plan on how to treat specific symptoms can help you feel in control of the allergy.

The Peanut Allergy Answer Book by Dr. Young is very helpful too.

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#6 of 31 Old 09-28-2010, 10:14 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Kim B Lynn View Post
Would this be considered a "severe" reaction for a first time trying it? Should I get him allergy tested at the doctors? Should I have some medicine on hand just in case he comes in contact with it again?
Yes, yes, and YES!! You are not being paranoid at all. Peanuts are the most common fatal allergic reaction, and each subsequent reaction is usually worse than the last. So this time was hives, next time could be swelling and closing of the airway within minutes. I don't want to scare you, but let you know how serious it can be. Definitely get an epipen ASAP! And just keep in mind if they do allergy testing, that's it not very accurate at this age. Have them do both a RAST (blood) and SPT (skin) if either comes up negative just to make sure. If both come up negative, retest in 3-6 months.

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#7 of 31 Old 09-28-2010, 10:35 PM
 
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If both come up negative, retest in 3-6 months.
That is really to frequent to test. The immune system does not change that quickly. I have never (out of 3 Dr's) had any one of them recommend testing anything more than one a year or even two.
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#8 of 31 Old 09-28-2010, 11:33 PM
 
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That is really to frequent to test. The immune system does not change that quickly. I have never (out of 3 Dr's) had any one of them recommend testing anything more than one a year or even two.


Sorry, this cracked me up.... changingseasons is mama to a daughter who develops new IgE allergies within days/weeks .

OP, I personally don't think you need to allergy test for peanuts - you certainly can, but actual reactions trump test results. I'd say it's very likely your son is IgE allergic to peanuts, and his next exposure could cause a more serious reaction. This happened to my niece, and the second exposure was only skin contact. I'd get an Epi Pen very quickly, and learn about how to peanut-proof your house, food sources (there's lots to learn about food made in facilities that also make products containing peanuts, for example). I don't have a peanut allergic child, so I'm not the person to try to explain it all - but you are absolutely right to take it very seriously.

Also, please keep an eye on him tonight - there is something called a biphasic reaction, where they can have reaction part II, several hours later (usually within 4-6 hours). A little more info on that here http://www.mothering.com/discussions...grace+biphasic

ETA: Just read again - if you are still breastfeeding, peanut proteins can pass through breastmilk, so you should also not eat any products containing peanuts or with a chance of peanut cross-contamination. He may not have reacted when you did eat peanut in the past, but he may now.

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#9 of 31 Old 09-28-2010, 11:38 PM
 
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Yes, that is a reaction, and a big one. That kind of spreading reaction is the type we were told by the allergist to use the epipen or go to an ER (she has fire ant reactions.) It is definitely very serious, and you wouldn't be overreacting. You should be able to see an allergist and be prescribed an epipen based on that reaction, without further testing.

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#10 of 31 Old 09-28-2010, 11:39 PM
 
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I had a similar reaction when I was a kid. BUT the hives didn't spread to my thighs, it was only my hands and face. So I would for sure have him tested.

I grew out of it if that makes you feel any better Occasionally I mention that I grew out of a peanut reaction and parents feel hopeful, so I thought I would tell you too

Be sure to have him tested, you can't just assume it was the peanuts. It could have been another ingredient, or something else entirely, like a strange soap or shampoo.

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#11 of 31 Old 09-28-2010, 11:42 PM
 
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Sorry, this cracked me up.... changingseasons is mama to a daughter who develops new IgE allergies within days/weeks .
Well it's a little rude to laugh but I should clarify.

You are not likely to OUTGROW an allergy in anything less than a year. Also for a group that is pretty skeptical about allergy testing, I am shocked that one would take a test at 100% accuracy.
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#12 of 31 Old 09-28-2010, 11:57 PM
 
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That is definitely a major reaction. My dd is nut allergic we have known it since allergy testing at around 2yo. Up until last year I managed to avoid exposing her to nuts so we never got a epi pen since we didnt know how bad it would be if it happened. She go exposed at school and like your ds developed hives that where almost solid on her torso. She also complained to her teacher of nausea and she did start to wheeze. But thankfully her asthma inhaler stopped the wheezing.

I immediately contacted her allergist and got an epi pen. Knowing that each time it can get worse I am not risking it.

FWIW though there are seasonal allergies and eczema in both mine and dh's family's dd is the only one who has nut allergies.

 
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#13 of 31 Old 09-29-2010, 12:02 AM
 
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That is really to frequent to test. The immune system does not change that quickly. I have never (out of 3 Dr's) had any one of them recommend testing anything more than one a year or even two.
Our allergist wants us scheduled every 3-6 months still, and we've been seeing him for over a year. Our last allergist recommended the 3-6 month timeline for testing as well, because a lot of things came up negative that I was sure would be positive. Every time we test, we get new positives. So yes, although it's not very common, the immune system CAN change that quickly. For example, sometimes people develop food allergies or intolerances after taking a course of antibiotics, because it throws off their gut balance. Once things are healed back up, that allergy/intolerance might just go away again.

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Well it's a little rude to laugh but I should clarify.

You are not likely to OUTGROW an allergy in anything less than a year. Also for a group that is pretty skeptical about allergy testing, I am shocked that one would take a test at 100% accuracy.
Well, if you read my first post I said specifically that allergy testing is not accurate at that age. THAT's why I said to retest- the older the child, the better results you will get.

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#14 of 31 Old 09-29-2010, 12:14 AM
 
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I am not trying to start anything or derail this thread for the OP, but I think anyone who has been around these parts knows your case is NOT typical.

Also, I did ready your first post. My point was that while your Dr. suggests testing every 3-6 months, just because your DD tests IgE +, we all know that isn't always the case.
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#15 of 31 Old 09-29-2010, 12:19 AM
 
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I am not trying to start anything or derail this thread for the OP, but I think anyone who has been around these parts knows your case is NOT typical.
I will agree with you there!

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#16 of 31 Old 09-29-2010, 03:51 AM
 
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If a doctor will give you an epi pen based on that reaction I think you're safe assuming you've got a peanut allergy.

Testing isnt' always accurate especially at that age and reactions are always taken over results anyway.

My son's first taste of nuts was a biphasic anaphylactic reaction.

Your child has been getting peanut via breastmilk so that likely was the source of sensitization.

You need an epi pen and peanut products need to be out of your home in my opinion (because peanut is one of those life threatening potential reaction) and certainly out of your diet. Check labels for may contain warnings as well.


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#17 of 31 Old 09-29-2010, 01:27 PM
 
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If a doctor will give you an epi pen based on that reaction I think you're safe assuming you've got a peanut allergy.

Testing isnt' always accurate especially at that age and reactions are always taken over results anyway.

My son's first taste of nuts was a biphasic anaphylactic reaction.

Your child has been getting peanut via breastmilk so that likely was the source of sensitization.

You need an epi pen and peanut products need to be out of your home in my opinion (because peanut is one of those life threatening potential reaction) and certainly out of your diet. Check labels for may contain warnings as well.

Replying to the bold above...

"May contain" and "processed in..." labeling is voluntary in the US. If you want to be sure (as sure as you can be with manufactured food) you have to call the company to ask if they label for "may contain" or "shared equip". If they don't label you have to ask about their manufacturing process.

I see too many people assume that if the label doesn't say "may contain" it must be safe.

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#18 of 31 Old 09-29-2010, 02:35 PM
 
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FYI, I bought some premixed flower seeds at Target and they had a tiny little note on the side stating they contained peanut shells as a filler. I totally would not have expected to find peanuts there. We are okay with them, but for those who aren't, be careful.

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#19 of 31 Old 09-29-2010, 02:39 PM
 
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Hmmmm.

My DD had this type of reaction to PB at 12 months- hives on her chin, neck and chest. Everywhere her saliva touched.

I called the pediatrician, and they told me to give her benadryl and try again at age 2.

This thread is making me wonder about the trying again at 2.

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#20 of 31 Old 09-29-2010, 03:13 PM
 
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There is no way I would try peanuts again after a reaction. It isnt worth the life of the child and peanuts are very dangerous.

 
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#21 of 31 Old 09-29-2010, 03:36 PM
 
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If I were going to try them again, it would be skin contact only, and in the parking lot of the emergency room.

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#22 of 31 Old 09-29-2010, 10:23 PM
 
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#23 of 31 Old 09-29-2010, 11:06 PM
 
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If I were going to try them again, it would be skin contact only, and in the parking lot of the emergency room.
Okay....I am sorry but that advice is just bad. I can't even believe knowing how serious a peanut allergy can be that anyone would suggest doing anything like this without a Dr. advising them. It is reckless and a really bad idea.
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#24 of 31 Old 09-29-2010, 11:47 PM
 
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Okay....I am sorry but that advice is just bad. I can't even believe knowing how serious a peanut allergy can be that anyone would suggest doing anything like this without a Dr. advising them. It is reckless and a really bad idea.
Why not? Being right outside of an emergency room (doing a skin contact trial) is just as safe as doing a food trial at your allergist's office, which is where they're normally done.

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#25 of 31 Old 09-30-2010, 12:11 AM
 
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If you are going to do it, why not do it with your Dr. How is that not safer?

Also, unless someone really knows what to look for, how long it may take to have a reaction, where exactly to take the child, why risk it?

Obviously this is just my opinion and I get that they are a dime a dozen. But you are talking to someone totally new to this allergy thing. Why suggest anything that could seriously put a child in danger.
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#26 of 31 Old 09-30-2010, 12:26 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Whew...I'm a little overwhelmed by entering this new world of food allergies. Thank you everyone for your answers. I appreciate having a lot of input!

We took him to our doctor who refered him to an allergist to get tested. We're waiting to see if medicaid will go through because we can't afford a specialist out of pocket (we don't have any insurance).

So some other questions I have:

*If he's allergic to peanuts, what other things have similar chemical components that I should be aware of? (Do peanuts have any "cousins" in the allergen sense?) I'm sure the allergist will do a good work up, but I want to be careful in the mean time...

*How do you handle the social aspect of having an allergenic kid? Do your kids wear medical braclets or anything like that? Do you inform teachers at school, parents of other kids in the class, etc?

*Should I expect an anaphalactic response if he's exposed again?

*How much benedryl can a 23 pound 1 year old safely have? My doctor told me 12 mg or a teaspoon, but I want to double check because I'm a little bit paranoid about drugs and he didn't check a chart or anything before he told me.

*What's IgE?
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#27 of 31 Old 09-30-2010, 12:46 AM
 
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Peanuts are in the legume family. People may or may not react to other legumes.

Socially....we are still working on this My son is 3 and pretty much never out of my/my DH's site except for 2 sitters (one being Grandma, one who only comes to our home). We haven't been dealing with schools yet. We take his food everywhere. No ID but we are considering.

You never know when an allergic reaction will turn into an ana reaction. No telling

Ask your Dr. about the dosage information. It is safest that way.

IgE is the immune factor involved in what most allergists consider "true" allergies. They are what a blood test would turn up as positive.


: Don't freak out too much till you see the Dr. Just be careful!
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#28 of 31 Old 09-30-2010, 12:51 AM
 
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If you are going to do it, why not do it with your Dr. How is that not safer?

Also, unless someone really knows what to look for, how long it may take to have a reaction, where exactly to take the child, why risk it?

Obviously this is just my opinion and I get that they are a dime a dozen. But you are talking to someone totally new to this allergy thing. Why suggest anything that could seriously put a child in danger.
Well, a previous poster's doctor told her just to try peanuts again in a year (at home.) Doctor's aren't always the most informed when it comes to food allergies.

The bolded is an excellent point though. Some reactions happen within seconds, but anaphylactic reactions can happen up to 4 hours later. And sometimes they aren't always immediately obvious, especially with a young child. They might just be moving their head funny (because their airway is closing) and not have any other signs.

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So some other questions I have:

*If he's allergic to peanuts, what other things have similar chemical components that I should be aware of? (Do peanuts have any "cousins" in the allergen sense?) I'm sure the allergist will do a good work up, but I want to be careful in the mean time...

*How do you handle the social aspect of having an allergenic kid? Do your kids wear medical braclets or anything like that? Do you inform teachers at school, parents of other kids in the class, etc?

*Should I expect an anaphalactic response if he's exposed again?

*How much benedryl can a 23 pound 1 year old safely have? My doctor told me 12 mg or a teaspoon, but I want to double check because I'm a little bit paranoid about drugs and he didn't check a chart or anything before he told me.

*What's IgE?
I'm glad you got the referral.

Many peanut allergic kids also react to tree nuts, but not all. But even if you're not allergic to tree nuts, there's always a risk they were processed on the same equipment as peanuts, so it's best to play it safe and stay away from all nuts. Peanuts are a legume, so you *may* see allergies to other legumes- soy is a common one, but peas and beans are also in that group.

Also- atopic (allergy-prone) children can develop allergies to any food, so it's best to watch carefully from now on when introducing new foods. Some people advise waiting until age 2 to introduce allergenic foods like eggs, but recent studies have shown that may or may not make any difference. It might also be a good idea to start keeping a food journal. That way, if you see any changes in sleep, behavior, ear wax (or other signs of inflammation), whatever- you can look back at the foods you've been eating and see if there's a pattern.

An anaphylactic reaction is possible, yes. Not guaranteed though. Every kid reacts different. Some react with anaphylaxis on their first trial of a food, and some people can eat a food for years with no problem and then have an anaphylactic reaction out of the blue. It's best to just be prepared.

Do NOT rely on Benadryl for an anaphylactic reaction. But if you need it for minor reactions like hives, you should check with your doc. My 3yo DD is about 28 pounds, and the doctor told us that we could use the dose on the bottle (I think the smallest dose listed is for 6 year olds.)

Oops- I missed a question. The social aspect.... that's hard, and I don't really know how to answer it. We don't have a medical bracelet for DD, although we really should. I stay at home, and we don't use any childcare. We only eat what I've prepared. It's hard, especially at first.... but it will get easier in time.

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#29 of 31 Old 09-30-2010, 01:21 AM
 
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Okay....I am sorry but that advice is just bad. I can't even believe knowing how serious a peanut allergy can be that anyone would suggest doing anything like this without a Dr. advising them. It is reckless and a really bad idea.
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Originally Posted by scsigrl View Post
If you are going to do it, why not do it with your Dr. How is that not safer?
Clearly my post didn't communicate what I meant. A PP (not the OP) said her doc told her to wait until her kid was 2 and then give him peanuts again. That's the comment I was replying to. If that was my doc, I wouldn't be listening to him, or doing a challenge in his office, I'd far rather trust the ER docs if I needed them.

What I should have said more clearly is that IF you're going to take this doc's advice and introduce peanuts to your child, don't do it at home, do it sitting outside the ER. Peanut allergy isn't something to mess around with.

OP - you'll get all this figured out . For now, get an appt and get an epi-pen and good instructions on when and how to use it.

Pick battles big enough to matter, small enough to win. ~Jonathan Kozel
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#30 of 31 Old 09-30-2010, 12:35 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Great. Today he woke up with a runny nose and occasional sneezing or coughing. He's never really "been sick" before and this is the most runny his nose has ever gotten. I hope he didn't catch something in the waiting room :P

Thanks again for all the responses. Can't wait to go to the allergists and find out what the heck is up. I think not knowing is the most stressful part for me. I'm afraid to feed him anything now lol.
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