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Old 08-08-2011, 07:06 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Just wondering if anyone else has read this book http://www.amazon.com/Dont-Kill-Birthday-Girl-Allergic/dp/0307588114  I just finished reading it.  I picked it up because the woman who wrote it is now in her 30s and still has multiple severe food allergies.  I just have a feeling that it is what my dd is in for.  I was curious what adulthood would look like for someone like dd.  Anyway, I was struck by all the reactions she documented in the book.  She was often embarrassed by them and seemed to hate the attention.  The reactions almost always happened from eating in a restaurant.  The question that kept popping in my head was "why not just bring your food??"  I would think that it would draw less attention/be less disruptive to her time out if she just brought her meal.

 

Just wondering what others thoughts were.  Wondering if my observation is just crazy.

 

Beth

 


Beth wife to Tom and mommy to Therese 11/4/04 Anna Mary 6/15/07 and Veronica 10/20/09
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Old 08-08-2011, 08:54 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Therese's Mommy View Post

The question that kept popping in my head was "why not just bring your food??"  I would think that it would draw less attention/be less disruptive to her time out if she just brought her meal.

 

Just wondering what others thoughts were.  Wondering if my observation is just crazy.

 

Beth

 

I haven't read the book yet.  I feel like there's no time to read (yet somehow carved out enough time to read the last Harry Potter--go figure!)  I just wanted to comment on this, as an adult with multiple (non-life threatening but some still severe) allergies.  If I'm going out to eat with extended family or friends at a restaurant, or even for big dinners, I usually eat beforehand.  If I had allergies as severe as the author I'd be terrified to eat out, but all the same as an adult we can manage our allergies better than kids can.  We can become comfortable with a certain amount of uncertainty or discipline ourselves to avoid uncertain situations entirely.  The risks the author are taking I would assume are well known to her in advance.  That's the difference between the adults and little kids living with allergies.
 

 


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Old 08-09-2011, 07:02 AM
 
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I read this book and had the same reaction.  She is very lucky that benadryl worked so well for her. 

 

I also read the Allergic Girl by Sloane ******.  Her book was more empowering in giving steps to get what you need while eating out (or to avoid eating out).

 

Both books, and your post Sweetsilver, make me realize that life will be just fine for my 5 yo DD if she remains as allergic into adulthood.  Thank goodness for epi-pens.

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Old 08-24-2011, 04:43 PM
 
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There's a waiting list for it at our library, but in the meantime I'm curious about "The Dark Side of Benadryl" that is mentioned in a blurb for the book. Can someone fill me in?

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