Best way to determine child's allergies? - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 23 Old 07-14-2012, 11:31 PM - Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 150
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Since my child was a newbie, there have been various signs of allergies: mucus in stool, blood in stool, under eye bags, blue under eye circles. My LO has been exclusively breastfeed, so I eliminated the things from my diet that I suspected were causing the allergic reaction in my LO. I eliminated dairy, nuts, even sugar due to yeast. Since my LO has begun eating solids, I've noticed various reactions, like hives exclusively on the bum, swelling of lips when accidental contact with dairy occurred. 

 

Anyway, I'm very concerned about the allergies, because I feel like they're more wide spread than I originally thought. I'd love some information or direction to resources that can supply me with information that will ensure a thorough testing of what kinds of allergies exist so I know what to avoid. Also, is there a way allergies can be tested for how dangerous they may be to a child? I don't have any allergies, nor does anyone in my family...so I'm totally at a loss for where to begin.

 

Please help! Thank you!

jewel1288 is offline  
#2 of 23 Old 07-15-2012, 12:16 AM
 
pek64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 2,502
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
So far, the reactions have not been 'serious', as your child's ability to breathe has not been affected.

I have tested things for myself by placing a drop of liquid containing the test item on my skin. Mostly I used it to test supplements, trying to find something I could take. I did once see it suggested on the Internet to test foods. I wiped off the test substance with a paper towel but otherwise left the area alone until the next day. If there is a skin reaction, avoid the food. Wash the test site, and choose a new test spot for the next test item. I found the inside of the forearm to be a good test area for an adult. Young children may be more sensitive all over.

It is wise to be working with a doctor, in case there is a severe reaction. A doctor can let you know what to look for and how to handle a severe reaction. Shop around for an allergist you feel comfortable with, is my advise.

Good luck. I hope all goes well for you and your child! There's lots of food allergy related info on the Internet now. Do your research after identifying the problem foods. Note, organic foods may test differently than conventional. I am allergic to conventional corn (hidden in multiple items) and yet can eat organic corn. I am too allergic to both dairy and soy to want to try those, however.

I would reccomend testing shellfish, mustard, and liver, which do not frequently get mentioned. Then there's the typical top allergins.

What foods have you noticed reactions from? Both from your breastmilk and from direct consumption.
pek64 is offline  
#3 of 23 Old 07-16-2012, 06:31 AM
 
scsigrl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: 2 steps from CraZyville
Posts: 1,791
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by pek64 View Post

So far, the reactions have not been 'serious', as your child's ability to breathe has not been affected.
I have tested things for myself by placing a drop of liquid containing the test item on my skin.

Swelling of the lips IS serious.  Along with hives this would be considered an anaphylactic reaction requiring an epi pen  (per allergist recommendations).

 

If the hives are only in the bum area, is it after a BM?  If the baby is just starting solids, that could explain that.  The acids in the foods and BMs irritate the skin.  

 

Have you kept a detailed food and symptom log? That's really the best way to see what's up.  Anything that caused lip swelling I would remove from your and the babies diet and speak to a board certified pediatric allergist who specializes in food allergies.  Allergy testing is inexact at best (50% of positive results are false positives but a negative result is 90+% accurate).  

 

Good luck.  It's tough to figure it all out.

scsigrl is offline  
#4 of 23 Old 07-16-2012, 08:46 AM
 
SweetSilver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Westfarthing
Posts: 5,176
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 75 Post(s)

Yes, swelling is severe enough to be serious.  

 

For skin-prick testing, they are looking at several things.  The presence of whelps is going to be more severe that the presence of just redness.  Also, irregular margins are considered worse.  I'm not sure why, but if you look at the results, that's the "P" at the end of some of the numbers.  Regardless of numbers, those that produce this type of reaction are considered more serious.

 

So, yes, they can predict which are going to be the most serious.  My tests have seemed to be quite accurate so far, more or less.  In the end, though, the challenge is the most important indication, not the testing itself.  Sometimes test results are severe enough that you'll be asked to do the challenge in office, instead of at home.

 

My daughter has dairy allergies that are as severe as your daughter's.  No dairy, ever, not even "natural butter flavor".  Once she accidentally gulped down some dairy milk at bedtime and, yes, her throat did start closing.  Luckily, she was still talking and breathing, but it was incredibly frightening for her.  (We only allow milk in single serving containers, and never in a glass so they cannot be mistaken.)  Before this incident, her "only" symptoms were severe redness and hives.  "Only" because she had never had a huge swig of milk before!  So, take those symptoms seriously.


"Let me see you stripped down to the bone. Let me hear you speaking just for me."
SweetSilver is online now  
#5 of 23 Old 07-16-2012, 09:26 AM
 
scsigrl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: 2 steps from CraZyville
Posts: 1,791
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by SweetSilver View Post

 

So, yes, they can predict which are going to be the most serious.  

 

 

That isn't true actually.  No test can determine how bad a reaction is going to be. There are kids who have very lowe RAST and skin number who are super sensitive to something and have anaphylactic reactions to drops of an allergen. There are also kids who have very high numbers and skin marks (welts not whelps) that are actually only "slightly" allergic to something.  


Immunology isn't very precise yet unfortunately :(

scsigrl is offline  
#6 of 23 Old 07-16-2012, 09:37 AM
 
SweetSilver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Westfarthing
Posts: 5,176
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 75 Post(s)

I didn't mean to imply it was perfect.  But it did jibe with my test scores.  Yes, testing is not perfect by a long shot.

 

If you google "whelps+allergies" you will see that it is used for describing welts and "hives".  Same as on my test sheet.  Primary definition is a young mammal.  Wiktionary does not have this use listed.  Interesting.  Now I'm curious......


"Let me see you stripped down to the bone. Let me hear you speaking just for me."
SweetSilver is online now  
#7 of 23 Old 07-16-2012, 09:42 AM
 
SweetSilver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Westfarthing
Posts: 5,176
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 75 Post(s)

I found this link on someone's irritation at the casual use of "whelp" when referring to allergies:

 

http://www.dailywritingtips.com/whelps-are-puppies/

 

Interesting.  I will say, I like my daughter's allergist better than mine and wish he didn't just do peds!

 

OK, back to the topic at hand.  Sorry.


"Let me see you stripped down to the bone. Let me hear you speaking just for me."
SweetSilver is online now  
#8 of 23 Old 07-16-2012, 11:12 AM
 
scsigrl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: 2 steps from CraZyville
Posts: 1,791
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
I just wanted to be sure that people don't get a false seance of security thinking "the reaction was small on testing" because that doesnt translate really well at all smile.gif.

In my medical training I have never heard of whelps nor had I ever heard it referd to as such in "allergy world" so it is very interesting!
scsigrl is offline  
#9 of 23 Old 07-16-2012, 02:00 PM
 
SweetSilver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Westfarthing
Posts: 5,176
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 75 Post(s)

That's mainly what I meant when I used the word "predict".  Not that it was absolute, but in a group of positive (skin) tests, one that is more likely to cause a life-threatening reaction can indeed *look* different than one causing milder symptoms.  I have no experience with blood tests.

 

I have no idea why "whelps" is so common.  I googled it to see if I just heard incorrectly, but apparently, seeing all the links to the (mis)use of the word, lots of people use it this way.  No idea how it got started.  Anyway, I finally did my research and won't use it again!


"Let me see you stripped down to the bone. Let me hear you speaking just for me."
SweetSilver is online now  
#10 of 23 Old 07-17-2012, 08:47 AM
 
34me's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 2,473
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I would second the keeping of a food/ environmental log with any reactions. My boys have been tested at least twice a piece and we still deal with reactions we didn't know would happen. Last night my 13 yo had a full on just this side of ER worthy reaction to aloe of all things. Well, aloe is also related to onions and garlic so we now know to keep an eye on those. Just like we watch kiwi and banana for latex.
34me is offline  
#11 of 23 Old 07-17-2012, 02:20 PM
 
SweetSilver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Westfarthing
Posts: 5,176
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 75 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by 34me View Post

Last night my 13 yo had a full on just this side of ER worthy reaction to aloe of all things. Well, aloe is also related to onions and garlic so we now know to keep an eye on those. 

Aloe makes my skin red as a cherry.  I always wondered how people could find it so soothing!  

 

There is *always* something else.  My daughter's mouth broke out in hives when eating a piece of deli turkey from the coop.  We narrowed it down to the smoke they used to flavor it.  She also has a mild reaction to the fluoride resin they use for kids (pine resin).


"Let me see you stripped down to the bone. Let me hear you speaking just for me."
SweetSilver is online now  
#12 of 23 Old 07-17-2012, 07:29 PM
 
EmbraceLife's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 76
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

After dealing with illnesses for about 9 months, my little one was referred to a dermatologist and then an allergist.  I won't get into all of his symptoms however, we discovered he is allergic to corn, wheat, gluten, dairy, soy, nuts, eggs and beef.  Now that we avoid all of those allergens, my lo lives a much more comfortable life.

 

It's tough to learn to avoid the items but some of his are life threatening so it's well worth it to us.

 

The allergy testing wasn't "comfortable" but we're grateful for the results and the skin prick testing was worth it to us.

 

Best wishes to you!

EmbraceLife is offline  
#13 of 23 Old 07-18-2012, 08:01 AM
 
AllergicChild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
Posts: 4
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I'm sorry your baby has had such troubles with food allergies. I agree that a Board certified allergist is the best way to determine what foods your child is allergic to. 

 

We found that foods within the same botanical family could cause issues. For example, my son is very allergic to peanuts but also reacts to peas and green beans on an allergy test. He never liked the taste of those two foods, and we figured out why!

 

My son is now 16 years old, and he still manages life threatening food allergies to peanuts, tree nuts, sesame, fish and shellfish. It's easier now that he's older because he's a really good self-advocate.

 

If you'd like to read more about our story of food allergies, please visit my website at www.AllergicChild.com.  

AllergicChild is offline  
#14 of 23 Old 07-20-2012, 08:49 AM
 
SweetSilver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Westfarthing
Posts: 5,176
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 75 Post(s)

AllergicChild, you have 3 posts and are advertising your website.  Are you here to post legitimately?  Or just to advertise?


"Let me see you stripped down to the bone. Let me hear you speaking just for me."
SweetSilver is online now  
#15 of 23 Old 07-21-2012, 10:44 AM
 
sbgrace's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 9,213
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hives and lip swelling indicates anaphylactic, life threatening, allergy.

You need an epi pen set and an allergist in my opinion. Get some benadryl and see if a pediatrician will call in an epi pen script while you wait on an allergist appointment. Many allergists will get you in fast if you tell them you had an anaphylactic episode..and you did imo.

You've got to get all dairy out of the house completely. It's dangerous to her as in life threatening.

An allergist can do an Immunocap RAST test. It's not perfect but will give you a number that can be used to track sensitivity to her major allergies going up or down. That way you'll know if/when she might outgrow dairy. They may start with skin prick testing. They always did with my son. Then RAST to get numbers to track the positives. Even a low RAST, though, can be anaphylactic. Symptoms always trump test results.

I do agree this is serious.

Rachelle, mommy to 8 year old boys! 

My Blog-free homeschooling finds and my lesson plans and link to the new User Agreement

sbgrace is offline  
#16 of 23 Old 07-22-2012, 11:10 AM
 
AllergicChild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
Posts: 4
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I'm not here to advertise in the least. I didn't want to hog the space of the thread with a very long post when I could provide a link to my site. My 16 year old son has had food allergies since he was a few months old. I have a lot of experience with this, and I have participated in several FAAN and FAI conferences including being a keynote speaker. I merely wanted to be helpful.

AllergicChild is offline  
#17 of 23 Old 07-30-2012, 08:04 PM
 
LaydieBugs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 144
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I haven't read all the suggestions, but I would see a doctor.  Are you in a state where naturopaths are licensed? 

 

There are many varying opinions out there, about how you should test and whom should do the testing.  I don't think there's much variance in the opinion that your child is having significant enough reactions to not keep up with trial and error on your own at home. 

 

I've been watching for food sensitivities in my son since he was born, because his Dad did IgG tests and came up positive for a few things (and his health improved a lot after he went off them).  Sure enough, as a newborn he had some symptoms and they were alleviated by my avoiding eggs and milk. 

 

We used a hypoallergenic food introduction schedule, and I began to suspect some other foods.  Then just recently at 26 months he got a rash after eating breakfast.  The naturopath had previously said she didn't want to do IgE or IgG tests because they score high on things that might not be a problem after all, but apparently when there's been a strong reaction it was the best choice. 

 

His blood was drawn the day of his reaction, and it scored off the charts for soy, and very high for wheat and gluten.  There were high scores for a few other things, and we're now starting 3 months of eliminating not just the "high scores" but also many of the low ones as well.  The idea is that his entire system is so wound up, we've got to make it very, very, very calm to reverse the trend.

 

The prognosis is that in a few months, we can go back to limiting only a few foods, and in a few years he might be able to eat almost everything.  The soy will probably be a lingering issue but might not provoke life-threatening reactions. 

 

My opinion, therefore, is that a naturopath is the best resource for early treatment, so your child might be free allergies on a lifelong basis.  I really wish I'd done the testing earlier.  It was tough because I have no insurance and have been really broke, but I do wish I'd come up with the money before his soy sensitivity got so bad as to turn into a real allergy. 

LaydieBugs is offline  
#18 of 23 Old 08-10-2012, 01:01 AM - Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 150
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by pek64 View Post

So far, the reactions have not been 'serious', as your child's ability to breathe has not been affected.
I have tested things for myself by placing a drop of liquid containing the test item on my skin. Mostly I used it to test supplements, trying to find something I could take. I did once see it suggested on the Internet to test foods. I wiped off the test substance with a paper towel but otherwise left the area alone until the next day. If there is a skin reaction, avoid the food. Wash the test site, and choose a new test spot for the next test item. I found the inside of the forearm to be a good test area for an adult. Young children may be more sensitive all over.
It is wise to be working with a doctor, in case there is a severe reaction. A doctor can let you know what to look for and how to handle a severe reaction. Shop around for an allergist you feel comfortable with, is my advise.
Good luck. I hope all goes well for you and your child! There's lots of food allergy related info on the Internet now. Do your research after identifying the problem foods. Note, organic foods may test differently than conventional. I am allergic to conventional corn (hidden in multiple items) and yet can eat organic corn. I am too allergic to both dairy and soy to want to try those, however.
I would reccomend testing shellfish, mustard, and liver, which do not frequently get mentioned. Then there's the typical top allergins.
What foods have you noticed reactions from? Both from your breastmilk and from direct consumption.

Those are great suggestions. Thank you. I had not even thought of doing a topical skin test. 

 

Direct consumption and indirect consumption: dairy and egg whites along with a possible nut allergy. The reactions with indirect contact were mucus and blood in my LO's stool. After one year of age, I tried giving my LO a small piece of egg white and a very small rash of red spots developed around the mouth area. So, no more egg whites.

 

Direct contact reactions is an area I'm not entirely positive about, as I thoughtlessly allowed me LO to try a few new foods within a 48 hour period, which included tomatoes, raspberries, strawberries, and peaches. After trying these new foods over a couple of days, my LO experienced hives only on the backside of the bum...so I'm not sure which food was the culprit. Therefore, I haven't offered them again.

jewel1288 is offline  
#19 of 23 Old 08-10-2012, 01:08 AM - Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 150
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaydieBugs View Post

I haven't read all the suggestions, but I would see a doctor.  Are you in a state where naturopaths are licensed? 

 

There are many varying opinions out there, about how you should test and whom should do the testing.  I don't think there's much variance in the opinion that your child is having significant enough reactions to not keep up with trial and error on your own at home. 

 

I've been watching for food sensitivities in my son since he was born, because his Dad did IgG tests and came up positive for a few things (and his health improved a lot after he went off them).  Sure enough, as a newborn he had some symptoms and they were alleviated by my avoiding eggs and milk. 

 

We used a hypoallergenic food introduction schedule, and I began to suspect some other foods.  Then just recently at 26 months he got a rash after eating breakfast.  The naturopath had previously said she didn't want to do IgE or IgG tests because they score high on things that might not be a problem after all, but apparently when there's been a strong reaction it was the best choice. 

 

His blood was drawn the day of his reaction, and it scored off the charts for soy, and very high for wheat and gluten.  There were high scores for a few other things, and we're now starting 3 months of eliminating not just the "high scores" but also many of the low ones as well.  The idea is that his entire system is so wound up, we've got to make it very, very, very calm to reverse the trend.

 

The prognosis is that in a few months, we can go back to limiting only a few foods, and in a few years he might be able to eat almost everything.  The soy will probably be a lingering issue but might not provoke life-threatening reactions. 

 

My opinion, therefore, is that a naturopath is the best resource for early treatment, so your child might be free allergies on a lifelong basis.  I really wish I'd done the testing earlier.  It was tough because I have no insurance and have been really broke, but I do wish I'd come up with the money before his soy sensitivity got so bad as to turn into a real allergy. 

Wow, thank you for sharing you experience. I'm not sure if naturopaths are licensed in our state or not, but I'll definitely be checking into it. Thanks!

 

I've been doing some reading about soy lately because I heard it's a hormone disruptor, which caused me to wonder if it might be why so many children have behavioral issues. I can remember how loopy I felt during my pregnancy when my hormones were all over the place, so I can't imagine that hormonal imbalances in children don't also effect their behavior. Anyway, that's just something I thought of when I was reading the articles related to the dangers of soy. I read most of them here, if you're interested in checking them out. Ultimately, being allergic to soy is probably is good thing because soy is bad stuff. A blurb I remember reading is that children who are fed soy-formula could be compared to the dosage of taking several (6, I think it was) birth control pills. THAT is scary! Anyway, the articles really opened my eyes and though we avoid it anyway, now I'm even more anal about it. Something to also look into is that things like soy and MSG aren't always called those things in ingredient lists, so know their "secret" names, so to speak.

jewel1288 is offline  
#20 of 23 Old 08-10-2012, 01:23 AM - Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 150
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by sbgrace View Post

Hives and lip swelling indicates anaphylactic, life threatening, allergy.
You need an epi pen set and an allergist in my opinion. Get some benadryl and see if a pediatrician will call in an epi pen script while you wait on an allergist appointment. Many allergists will get you in fast if you tell them you had an anaphylactic episode..and you did imo.
You've got to get all dairy out of the house completely. It's dangerous to her as in life threatening.
An allergist can do an Immunocap RAST test. It's not perfect but will give you a number that can be used to track sensitivity to her major allergies going up or down. That way you'll know if/when she might outgrow dairy. They may start with skin prick testing. They always did with my son. Then RAST to get numbers to track the positives. Even a low RAST, though, can be anaphylactic. Symptoms always trump test results.
I do agree this is serious.

I had NO idea lip swelling and hives were indicators of anaphylactic! Goodness, thank you so much for your suggestions!!!

jewel1288 is offline  
#21 of 23 Old 08-10-2012, 01:30 AM - Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 150
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by scsigrl View Post

Swelling of the lips IS serious.  Along with hives this would be considered an anaphylactic reaction requiring an epi pen  (per allergist recommendations).

 

If the hives are only in the bum area, is it after a BM?  If the baby is just starting solids, that could explain that.  The acids in the foods and BMs irritate the skin.  

 

Have you kept a detailed food and symptom log? That's really the best way to see what's up.  Anything that caused lip swelling I would remove from your and the babies diet and speak to a board certified pediatric allergist who specializes in food allergies.  Allergy testing is inexact at best (50% of positive results are false positives but a negative result is 90+% accurate).  

 

Good luck.  It's tough to figure it all out.

Yes it was very scary and without a doubt serious. I've since started carrying benadryl with us at all times, but the other day I was looking at the directions, just in case I needed to use it and noticed it should not be used unless the child is four years of age or older. My child is just 18 months. Is there a benadryl suitable for toddlers? A relative ran to the store upon the first reaction and I stayed with my child and the swelling went down rather quickly, so that's why I'm unsure of what's available. We obviously avoid dairy like the plague now, but I'm still concerned about the fruits that caused the hives. The hives didn't appear after a BM and lasted for a few days before becoming scally and eventually healing all together. My little one didn't seem phased by them at all though, which I found strange. I did assume it was the acid, considering the fruit exposure included peaches, raspberries, and strawberries. 

 

Goodness, it is so much information to take in. Thanks for sharing what you know! :)

jewel1288 is offline  
#22 of 23 Old 08-10-2012, 04:51 AM
 
hippiemom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Posts: 1,172
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

As a lifelong person with allergies, from a family that has several, I can tell you that allergies are not "set".. they change as you grow.  Some get better, the "grew out of it" allergy; some get worse.  Mine have definitely waxed and waned.  

 

Point being, any allergic reaction is the body saying "no".  If you push it because the initial reaction is mild, you are risking a more severe one.  I have done this, foolishly a few times, with painful and scary results.  Listen when your body says "No", or it will tend to tell you so more loudly!

 

Allergy skin and blood tests are common, easy to get, and reliable in my experience.  Most of us with allergies will also tell you that we 'discovered' them along the road of life, not always subtle-ly :)  Hives and swollen anything are not to be ignored; definitely avoid whatever causes it and keep your Benedryl well-stocked.

hippiemom is offline  
#23 of 23 Old 08-10-2012, 06:03 AM
 
scsigrl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: 2 steps from CraZyville
Posts: 1,791
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)

Benadryl will NOT STOP and anaphylactic reaction. You really should get to and allergist or at least your ped for an epi pen script (2 pens to be with the child at all times) also, a FAAP is the best teaching tool for you and for daycare/school as the years progress.

 

You did everything right for that first reaction not knowing what was going on. Now it's time to take the next step to protect your little one!

 
scsigrl is offline  
Reply

Tags
Allergies

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off