Is goat's cheese safe if my child has a dairy allergy? - Mothering Forums

Is goat's cheese safe if my child has a dairy allergy?

jewel1288 (TS)
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My little one is 19 months old now and has always shown an allergy to dairy. So, I don't eat dairy because I breastfeed and nor does my child. I started eating goat's milk cheese and yogurt as a way to still include some kind of cheese and yogurt in my diet. As far as I can tell, my child hasn't had any reaction to it by way of my breast milk. 

 

I am wondering if giving my child's goat's cheese would be safe? Does anyone know? I did a quick google search, but it didn't turn up any helpful information. 

 

I realize my child's dairy allergy has to do with the cow's milk protein, but I suspect it's different than goat's milk protein. I've been told and read that goat's milk is the closest product that compares to a mother's milk, so I suspect it would be safe. Also, my child nabbed a single shred of hard goat cheese the other day and said mm and had no reaction. I still want to be safe.

 

Any help would be great! Thank you.


scsigrl's Avatar scsigrl
07:10 PM Liked: 166
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98% + of people with cow dairy allergies are also allergic to goat milk.

 

pek64's Avatar pek64
07:14 PM Liked: 2091
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First, not all dairy allergies are to the protein. Some are to the fat.

That said, some who are allergic to cows milk are also allergic to goat's milk. Some are not. Not very helpful, I know. Maybe start slow and keep a sharp eye out for reactions. I wish you all the best.
jewel1288 (TS)
07:18 PM Liked: 12
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Hmm... now I'm confused about what my child is actually allergic to regarding the dairy! Any suggestions on helpful resources? I've always simply avoided it, but only thought my child might enjoy goat's milk cheese. Obviously, I wanted to check into it first ! :)


pek64's Avatar pek64
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What symptoms did your child have? How did you come to realize it was a problem with dairy?

In case someone tries to insist it's the protein, I'm allergic to the fat. Then, of course, there's the ever popular lactose intolerance.

Sorry. I'm worrying tonight about my own problem. Back to yours!

I need more info on your child's dairy reactions before I can try to answer your questions.
APToddlerMama's Avatar APToddlerMama
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Pek--how'd you find that out?

OP- no! Goats milk is not a safe alternative if your child has an actual dairy allergy and if that's the case, you shouldn't be having it while breastfeeding either. What makes you think he's allergic?
SweetSilver's Avatar SweetSilver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by APToddlerMama View Post

OP- no! Goats milk is not a safe alternative if your child has an actual dairy allergy and if that's the case, you shouldn't be having it while breastfeeding either. 

Not safe, agreed.


pek64's Avatar pek64
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Altmedangel.com and sarahmelamed.com both state that goat's milk can sometimes be tolerated by those who are dairy allergic. Obviously for those allergic to both, avoidance of both is required.

Dr. Sears also agrees, but I want to confirm his lactose info, since it disagrees with my encyclopedia.
APToddlerMama's Avatar APToddlerMama
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Sorry pek--I wasn't clear. I was wondering how you figured out you're allergic to the fat and not protein in milk? Just curious bc one of my kids has a dairy allergy.
pek64's Avatar pek64
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In my case, it was fairly easy to determine that it is the fat I'm allergic to because the progression of my dairy allergy was slow. It took until I was twenty for me to figure out. It took another twelve to get a doctor to take me somewhat seriously. Maybe that's how I learned persistence.
nstewart's Avatar nstewart
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You could check with your doctor or naturopath about getting a screening done to see if your child is allergic to goat milk products.  We just had a sensitivity screening and my DS is sensitive to cows milk but not goats milk.  If you want some non-soy options for cheese and yogurt, there are also sheeps milk products (not sure if those would be ok or not) and I recently bought coconut mik yogurt.  Just some other options for you!


SweetSilver's Avatar SweetSilver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pek64 View Post

Altmedangel.com and sarahmelamed.com both state that goat's milk can sometimes be tolerated by those who are dairy allergic. Obviously for those allergic to both, avoidance of both is required.
Dr. Sears also agrees, but I want to confirm his lactose info, since it disagrees with my encyclopedia.

Perhaps it depends on the severity of the allergy.  I've mentioned this before, but I did substitute goat's milk in the early stages of my dd's severe dairy allergy, before consulting anybody, and the reaction was less severe but noticeable.  If one has a mild allergy, perhaps goat's milk could be tolerated.  But if the allergy is severe (like EpiPen severe), goat's milk is not a safe alternative to cow's milk.  

 

For other forms of dairy intolerance, give goat's milk a try.  If the symptoms are swelling and hives on contact, then goat's milk is likely to cause a reaction as well.


pek64's Avatar pek64
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SweetSilver View Post

Perhaps it depends on the severity of the allergy.  I've mentioned this before, but I did substitute goat's milk in the early stages of my dd's severe dairy allergy, before consulting anybody, and the reaction was less severe but noticeable.  If one has a mild allergy, perhaps goat's milk could be tolerated.  But if the allergy is severe (like EpiPen severe), goat's milk is not a safe alternative to cow's milk.  

For other forms of dairy intolerance, give goat's milk a try.  If the symptoms are swelling and hives on contact, then goat's milk is likely to cause a reaction as well.

Certainly, for an allergy that is epi-pen severe caution is required!!

That said, the two (cow and goat dairy products) can give different reactions to different people. Some are allergic to both, some are allergic to one and not the other, some can tolerate both.

If it would make you feel better, OP, get an allergy test done. The results can be inconclusive for gastrointestinal symptoms, but should be more accurate for hives, swelling, and epi-pen type reactions.

Edited to remove double quote.
jewel1288 (TS)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pek64 View Post

What symptoms did your child have? How did you come to realize it was a problem with dairy?
In case someone tries to insist it's the protein, I'm allergic to the fat. Then, of course, there's the ever popular lactose intolerance.
Sorry. I'm worrying tonight about my own problem. Back to yours!
I need more info on your child's dairy reactions before I can try to answer your questions.

Mucus and blood in the stool as an infant. Of course, now that my child eats solids, I wouldn't be able to see blood unless I inspected it. However, once I eliminated dairy, I no longer saw blood in the stool, but did see mucus. I never did figure out what the mucus was from. I ate nearly sugar free, gluten free, diary free, soy-free, meals. I was actually struggling to keep weight on. I also don't eat nuts, because I thought those might be causing the mucus. 

 

My child nabbed some greek fries covered in garlic and feta that caused a swollen lip and red spots around the lip area at around 15 months of age. A week or two prior to this, I allowed my LO to handle some garlic and even chew on it and there was no reaction so I'm 100% confident it's a dairy allergy. I suppose I just don't know what portion of the milk causes the actual reaction. :-/


jewel1288 (TS)
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I think the best thing would just be to have my LO tested. I don't want to take any risks with a reaction. Oh goat cheese, how I will miss you until then! :)

 

Thanks for all the information!


SweetSilver's Avatar SweetSilver
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Feel better with this: kids are likely to drop a dairy allergy by the age of 5 or so.  (Not always, including my dd who is 7,5 and still going strong.)  And you can add back what you miss once you are done nursing.


pek64's Avatar pek64
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Depending on the severity of the allergy, it may not be possible to have dairy in the house even after nursing.

Just take it one step at a time. For now, find out if your child is allergic to goat's milk. That's my advice.
APToddlerMama's Avatar APToddlerMama
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SweetSilver View Post

Feel better with this: kids are likely to drop a dairy allergy by the age of 5 or so.  (Not always, including my dd who is 7,5 and still going strong.)  And you can add back what you miss once you are done nursing.

Not anymore. It's around 20% by age four, 50% by 10, and 70% by adulthood.
SweetSilver's Avatar SweetSilver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pek64 View Post

Depending on the severity of the allergy, it may not be possible to have dairy in the house even after nursing.
 

DD is severely allergic, and we have had no trouble keeping it in the house.  Are thinking like gluten?  That just having it in the house might cause reactions even if it is not consumed?  This has not been our experience.  We do separate cutting boards, separate cast iron pans, and we cannot have any dairy that looks like her soy milk packages.  So, dd2's cow's milk and mine for the occasional cereal need to be in those single-serving, super-expensive and environmentally unfriendly packages.  

Quote:
Originally Posted by APToddlerMama View Post


Not anymore. It's around 20% by age four, 50% by 10, and 70% by adulthood.

Thanks for the update.


pek64's Avatar pek64
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Nope. I'm not confusing dairy and gluten. I cannot breathe dairy without some reaction. Hopefully, this will nevet be the situation for anyone here, but I felt I should alert the OP to the possibility. It's a situation that stinks.
savithny's Avatar savithny
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If feta was a problem, you should be aware that while some feta is cow milk, many feta cheeses are made with sheeps milk or goat milk. If you can find out, that would give you a clue.
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