Is it possible to have a contact dairy allergy? - Mothering Forums
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#1 of 11 Old 09-13-2012, 09:03 AM - Thread Starter
 
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My daughter is 11 months old and breaks out in hives whenever she touches milk products. We have been avoinding giving her dairy, but started to slowly introduce some things. She did fine with things like vanilla wafers, and other product that "may contain Dairy" I am breastfeeding and she doesn't have a problem when I eat dairy. But about a week again we had to take he to the emergency room because her lips and tongue were swelling and she was covered in hives after touching some butter. I have been doing research and I can't find anything that is consistent with her symptoms. It seems like a milk allergy, but then why I am able to have dairy and it not affect her at all? I am so confused and frustrated. I have taken her to the doctor, but he was not at all helpful. Any information would be appreciated.

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#2 of 11 Old 09-13-2012, 09:47 AM
 
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Lip swelling and tongue swelling are major signs of an anaphylactic reaction.  Have you seen an allergist?  If not, you nee to and need epi pens.

 

Not all Mom's pass allergens through breastmilk.  Also, many milk allergic kids can tolerate baked milk but not other forms. 

 

HTH

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#3 of 11 Old 09-13-2012, 11:11 PM
 
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Baked milk able to be tolerated when milk is not? I never heard that one.
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#4 of 11 Old 09-14-2012, 05:17 AM
 
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#5 of 11 Old 09-14-2012, 09:13 AM
 
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I read the first article and refuse to join to read the second.

MOST IMPORTANTLY, the children in the article did not have such severe reactions as your daughter, Kaycee. I would not experiment with feeding your daughter any dairy, if it were me. You need to proceed with caution.

There are a few things that come to mind regarding the reaction. You, I presume, have eaten the butter and there was no reaction by your daughter. If that is correct, I agree that most likely the allergen was not passed along. As to what is the allergen, it could be anything in the butter. Dairy is obvious, the protein being the accepted belief as the culprit. I always reacted worse to dairy fat than protein, and I'm seeing more of that on the Internet. Also, if the butter is salted, there could be cornstarch in the salt. If it is sea salt from the ocean, there would probably be microscopic shellfish in the sea salt. Sea salt from old dried seas can usually be tollerated, but again, extreme caution should be used due to the severity of the reactions.

My comments on the article in general :

First, this has effect only to allergies that are "outgrown", and I have my doubts about allergies being outgrown as opposed to the immune system being weakened to where the child does not respond to the allergen. May sound the same, but the latter means the child is more prone to illness.

Second, cheese was something I was able to tolerate until nearly 20 years old. And having milk in a baked good means other ingredients which can alter the body's response. If it was the baking which altered the protein, why not simply bake the milk and let the child drink it.

No. This article shows flawed testing, in my opinion.
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#6 of 11 Old 09-14-2012, 10:21 AM
 
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I was not in any way suggesting the OP do at home testing, my first post asked if she was working with an allergist. My presenting the articles was in response to your question and in no way directed towards the OP to do a home challenge.  

 

The fact is that dairy is most likely the issue.  Digging into the corn or sea salt seems like a stretch when there is documentation that many dairy allergic children, even with past anaphylactic reactions DO tolerate baked in milk. So it is possible, but given the facts, looking at the obvious seems more likely.

 

Allergies are a hypersensitivity so I am not understanding how your theory of being immunosuppressed would work.

 

pek64, I really don't get why you need to be so argumentative on things related to allergies.  You may see flawed testing and you are absolutely entitled to your opinion on that.  These are well respected, peer review studies by trained allergists.  So you can believe what you want about the testing but I am more inclined to think they have some training to deal with these things.  I know many many many allergy Mom's who's kids do just fine with baked milk but can't "drink" it.  It isn't uncommon at all.  

 
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#7 of 11 Old 09-14-2012, 05:44 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scsigrl View Post

Lip swelling and tongue swelling are major signs of an anaphylactic reaction.  Have you seen an allergist?  If not, you nee to and need epi pens.

Not all Mom's pass allergens through breastmilk.  [bold]Also, many milk allergic kids can tolerate baked milk but not other forms. [/bold]

HTH

This is where baked milk was first mentioned.

It was irresponsible to bring up baked milk for a child who has swelling of the mouth. If the OP misinterpreted that casual remark to be a suggestion that she experiment her child could have had an even more severe reaction.

And due to such irresponsible remarks, after this post I will no longer respond to you directly.
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#8 of 11 Old 09-14-2012, 06:12 PM
 
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Originally Posted by pek64 View Post

This is where baked milk was first mentioned.
It was irresponsible to bring up baked milk for a child who has swelling of the mouth. If the OP misinterpreted that casual remark to be a suggestion that she experiment her child could have had an even more severe reaction.
And due to such irresponsible remarks, after this post I will no longer respond to you directly.

OP--I have a kid with a severe milk allergy and yes your daughter is definitely having an allergic reaction and yes, it's a "contact allergy" but it is very likely a sign that she also has a life threatening or serious milk allergy that you need to be very careful about. Get an epipen right away.

In terms of breastmilk, my kiddo was reacting mildly to dairy in my breastmilk but I didn't notice it until he had a severe reaction to actual milk. The protein from the milk is going to pass through your breast milk and while you may not see overt signs of it causing issues, it could definitely cause her allergy to progress and become more serious so you really need to avoid milk while nursing.

As far as the baked milk pek--my son's allergist told me that milk baked a certain way for a certain length of time changes the protein. 75% of kids over the age of one with a milk allergy will be able to tolerate milk in this form. Having it regularly will supposedly help a child outgrow their milk allergy. Obviously not something to fool around with at home. OP you should definitely see an allergist. Hopefully they can do this kind of food challenge in office and then both of you could eat baked goods.
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#9 of 11 Old 09-14-2012, 06:30 PM
 
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Originally Posted by pek64 View Post


This is where baked milk was first mentioned.
It was irresponsible to bring up baked milk for a child who has swelling of the mouth. If the OP misinterpreted that casual remark to be a suggestion that she experiment her child could have had an even more severe reaction.
And due to such irresponsible remarks, after this post I will no longer respond to you directly.

 

My saying that was to ANSWER the OP's question.  She asked if it was possible and it is.  I also said FIRST she needed to talk to an allergist.  

You can all it irresponsible if you please, again your choice. I was answering a question posed in the OT. So thank you for pointing out that I did mention it first, as an answer to a question asked.  

 
 
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#10 of 11 Old 09-14-2012, 07:14 PM
 
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Originally Posted by scsigrl View Post

 

My saying that was to ANSWER the OP's question.  She asked if it was possible and it is.  I also said FIRST she needed to talk to an allergist. 
 
 

And this information is no different than what just about any pediatric allergist will tell the OP and therefore no more irresponsible.  They will tell her some kids can digest baked milk, but many cannot.  Sorry, pek64, but this is just the current accepted information.  I know accepted information changes with time (such as avoiding common allergens in every kid's diet until the age of one, for example, which pretty recently changed) but as far as I know, the baked milk (and egg) information is still current.

 

The question of why "baked milk" will not cause a reaction when drinking it is a good question for the allergist.  My guess is that is has to do in part with the quantity.  I notice raw milk affects me a whole lot more than pasteurized milk.  (I am not allergic as an adult, but I am lactose intolerant.  My eldest dd is severely allergic to dairy, and we do avoid all milk in all forms.  Her allergist who does studies with his colleagues in our region is encouraged by the trials reducing anaphylactic reaction in peanut allergic individuals by introducing micro-quantities in a control setting.  He'd like us to try something similar with dd with her wheat and dairy allergies.  I'm more than a little hesitant!)


Give me a few minutes while I caffeinate.
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#11 of 11 Old 10-03-2012, 10:58 AM
 
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I know this is very true for my DD. She can eat milk in a baked product without any problem but if she has it straight (cheese, milk, ice cream), OR if she even touches a surface where milk had been, she gets hives. Her blood has tested as Class 3 (high) IGE allergy to milk. We found out the baked good thing by accident, not through home experimentation. So I must concur that the currently accepted view from pediatric allergies is correct, at least in our case it is.

PS- she also doesn't have obvious reactions through breast milk when I ingest dairy although again, not something I do on purpose now that I know of the severity of her allergy.

I totally agree with the advice of getting an EpiPen... you never know when reactions can worsen to a life-threatening state, especially if you're seeing swelling happen now upon exposure.

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