Breakfast ideas for allergic kids? - Mothering Forums
Allergies > Breakfast ideas for allergic kids?
AutumnMelody's Avatar AutumnMelody 04:05 AM 02-24-2007
I really need some inspiration here. My kids are allergic to, well, everything, um, literally...

So, our survival plan is basically to cut out the major offenders and I try not to give too much of any one type of food in the course of the week. We had been on a strict elimination diet for a while, but that and other life issues left me so stressed that DH would find me crying over my menu plans in the middle of the night. There came a point where I just couldn't take it anymore.

I think we do pretty well most of the time, but breakfast is a huge problem for me. I need good ideas for energizing breakfasts that will help to sustain blood-sugar levels in active little people.

I can't cook in our house right now. I cook in another building, one that make me sick because of my allergies, so it needs to be things that can be cooked quickly and easily. Food that can be made in the crock pot is a huge plus because I do actually have a crock pot in the house.

I need suggests that fit the above requirements and are also: gluten, mold, casein, egg, and soy free. Any thoughts??

USAmma's Avatar USAmma 04:07 AM 02-24-2007
How about rice pudding with raisins and rice milk?
CrunchyCate's Avatar CrunchyCate 04:34 AM 02-24-2007
I get this brand of cereal:

The Koala Crisp, Gorilla Munch, and Panda Puffs should be gluten free and we use rice milk.
CrunchyCate's Avatar CrunchyCate 04:37 AM 02-24-2007
Ooops, The Panda Puffs aren't soy free. However, the Amazon Frosted Flakes are gluten free, too (I just haven't see them in any local stores.)
Spastica's Avatar Spastica 04:49 AM 02-24-2007
Cream of rice is found next to the cream of wheat. You can add chopped fruits and other stuff. I have made muffins from cream of rice for my boyfriend, before he passed. He loved them and gobbled them up They taste like cranberry muffins and were good enough for anybody to eat - nobody would be able to tell they're rice based. I mix applesauce, 4 ripe bananas, 1 packet cream of rice, and add some cinnamon, dried cranberries, and perhaps a splash of orange juice and vanilla extract and bake them in a muffin pan.

You can also make a myriad of things with potatoes, which is something that is breakfast, lunch or dinner friendly. Sweet potatoes pack more vitamins than plain potatoes. A combination of protein and veggies are a great breakfast combo. You can find organic sausages made from chicken, turkey, pork, etc, with less yucky stuff than regular sausage. Don't forget that 'grits' are made from corn. That's an acquired taste, but you can do a lot with grits. Well made grits with some flavoring is good. The cousin of grits is Polenta - you can find readymade Polenta in the grocery store in tubes. You may need to think a little out of the box with breakfast and not think in terms of just sweet typical American foods.

True corn flakes, amarynth flakes, and true buckwheat can be used (buckwheat is gluten free). Some people have no problems with oats, but that's under hot debate. People on gluten free diets can have quinoa, amarynth, buckwheat, teff (Ethiopian grain), tapioca, and anything from corn, potatoes, and rice. You can buy rice flour and sometimes tapioca flour at any Asian grocery store. You can tweak recipes and make breads or thicken sauces that way.

Just check the back for wheat, barley or rye and you should be okay.
wendy1221's Avatar wendy1221 12:36 PM 02-24-2007
We do cereal, fresh fruit, leftover dinner warmed up, safe breads toasted, pancakes (they're fine w/out milk and eggs, any flour you can use will make good pancakes), smoothies.
sbgrace's Avatar sbgrace 03:48 PM 02-24-2007
For blood sugar I always make sure we have fat and protein (and fiber in the case of fruit too). Sooo...things for breakfast here might be hot cereal (millet, amarynth, buckwheat--which despite the name is gluten free). I make it with fruit and blend it all together for smoothness. Add in some ghee (which is casein free) or coconut oil for fat. I also soak though and wouldn't do it otherwise and that would generate mold. To be honest, we don't have time for that in the morning so it is generally a lunch. I don't lock myself into notions of set meals being set things.
Sausage as a previous poster said can be made in a healthy way--you do have to check for gluten and casein and soy but we have some that has none of that. That and fruit baked in ghee or oil might be a nice breakfast. We had chicken sausage for dinner last night!
The biggest and easiest suggestion I've found is smoothies and that is our standard breakfast--free of all of the above. You have to think outside the normal smoothie box though when you are dairy and soy free. We are dairy and soy free too--and also free of all those allergens except I do egg once a week and I would drive myself nutty trying to eliminate molds as anything not cooked up fresh has mold--including the fruits you buy at the store. I do pastuerize (cook) everything just prior to eating it. So, I cook the ingredients to almost boiling prior to mixing it to reduce mold issues and I'm not sure how effective that is which is the only hesitation I have in recommending this. Anyway, I add in a base (carrot juice, coconut milk, whatever works for your crew) and then vegetables and/or fruits and actually I do chicken or another meat as well for a protein. Avocado is a protein source that I use too (banana has protein but we don't tolerate that). Both of the last two thicken and help things blend as well. You could use another protein source that your children tolerate instead. If the base is strong what you add isn't noticeable at all. I do a fat too--generally olive oil (only if it is a cool drink), rice oil, coconut oil, or ghee (both of the last two must be a warm drink) for fat. Rice oil is tasteless. My boys like the coconut oil taste and don't seem to mind the olive or ghee as long as I don't over-do it. My point is smoothie type drinks can be your friend in all of this!
You may know this but certain rice milks have issues with gluten cross-contamination so check that out carefully.
I would encourage you to think outside the box in terms of breakfast foods. Lots of people do soups for breakfast (very crockpot friendly). There is nothing that says breakfast has to be eggs or pancakes or cereal based. So I'd just think of it as another healthy meal and forget the notion of breakfast!
By the way if you have any tasty recipes that are free of your allergens and also don't have tomato I would love to know! I'm one of those tears over menus people too...
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