soon to be toddler-mama frustrated with childproofing - Mothering Forums

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Old 01-21-2004, 06:19 PM - Thread Starter
 
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THis is definately a new type of Motherhood...

I feel like I chase my 9 month old around all day. We do ride in the ERGo when mommy needs to do dishes or get dinner ready or when we go outside for a walk.

But, when he is not in the ERGO, I know he needs to be down on the floor, crawling, exploring, learning...Its so exciting, but exhausting to follow him to make sure he doesn't get seriously hurt

We have removed things that we don't want him to get to, for the most part.

This is honestly harder than getting less sleep at night!!

Tips from you Toddler mamas???Is it easier when they walk?

Me, 42
Hubs, 44
Married 22 years
Two boys 11 and 9
and a HUGE surprise: I'm almost 10 weeks pregnant!
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Old 01-21-2004, 06:31 PM
 
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umm.... no. LOL ;D sorry!

But, you find new ways to cope, and in that sense it gets easier. Once you get a better idea of what you can expect & find new ways to get your 'you' time, you'll love it i bet! It's definately more challenging, but oh so fun!!!
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Old 01-21-2004, 06:39 PM
 
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After this great chat with my dad, father of 5, I believe that parenthood is hard and it doesn’t get easier…it just gets different.

For us, parents of a 2 years, 4 month old, things have *changed* but they aren’t harder OR easier. As some things get easier (sleep deprivation) other things get harder (disciplining a toddler). My dad says that this continues for about 25 years, which is when things start getting good…I love my dad!

What saves me when things seem to be getting harder is thinking about the ways that they are getting easier…looking for the balance.

Mama to DD September 2001 and DD April 2011 *Winner for most typos* eat.gif
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Old 01-21-2004, 06:39 PM
 
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Hi there,
I find that with each developmental stage new challenges occur. I wouldn't say that it gets 'easier' it just changes. Some things are less stressful but then there are others that become stressful. With each new stage come bigger rewards too.

Specifically though, inregards to your situation of worrying that your child may get hurt or get into something. I created a safe room where it was childproofed to my dd's level and then I could relax too!! I think this actually helped her learn to play independant of me as well because I didn't always have to be involved. Just being in the room was enough. This is still how we work it although now we are trying to introduce the concepts of not touching or leaving things be. There is a great book called 'You are your childs first teacher' by Rahima Baldwin Dancy that is so helpful. She talks about developmental stages and childproofing amoungst other concepts. Some things are just too complex for children to learn so it is important to create an enviroment that they can learn and thrive in without harm.

I do remember that our living room was very functional for many months. Even a one point my dh taped foam to the corners of our wood coffee table:LOL It has been only recently that I could even think of having something out for esthetic reasons. Just take a good look at the room and see if there is something you can do to make it easier. Such as taking the cushions off the couch and placing them on the floor in front of the couch. Then its a padded area as well levels that your child can manuveur if your couch is farely low.

I hope this helps, I kinda rambled on. I just want to add a comment that my mom says, Bigger kids, bigger challenges. But I truly believe that with the challenge comes the reward!!
Hang in there
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Old 01-21-2004, 07:10 PM
 
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I'm right there with you, Melinda. Lacy is walking now, and NOTHING is safe. Our stuff has graduated to either the top of the CD player, or the top of the entertainment center. All doors are kept SHUT and she still manages to get into things I have tried to make a "play place" in every room of the house. Also, she loves to get into the cabinets. I don't really think ther eis any way to "baby proof" a house, just try to make it as safe as possible. Since she started walking, she is by no means steady,and falls all of the time. We also have hardwood floors, so the falls sometimes leave bumps and bruises. As far as babyproofing, I just try to keep as close of an eye on her as I can. She is fast, so it doesn't always work.
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Old 01-21-2004, 08:27 PM - Thread Starter
 
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ooo-great support on this board! Thanks mamas for the encouragment~

Me, 42
Hubs, 44
Married 22 years
Two boys 11 and 9
and a HUGE surprise: I'm almost 10 weeks pregnant!
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Old 01-21-2004, 08:50 PM
 
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. . .but once it's done, you don't have to do much else!

Fortunately for us, we had already rabbit-proofed our home (sounds crazy, I know, but all you need is one elctrified bunny. . .) which meant we didn't have much more to do.

You've probably already done all this, but just in case you haven't: make sure your outlets are covered, doors that are going to be left open have rubber stoppers to prevent pinched fingers, anything you don't want touched moved up high, table/fireplace corners are protected with foam strips or padding, toilet seat has a lock, cabinets have latches and doors are kept closed. If you're in a major city you can probably find a baby proofer in the yellow pages. They come, do an estimate of your home and then do all the work for you. Of course, you pay for it!

If you want to do it yourself (we did!), most large multi-purpose stores will have what you need to get started (Target, Wal-Mart, Babies R Us), etc. Then if you can get someone to watch your kid for an afternoon and plan for both of you to work on it, you can do all the installation at once. Then just keep a sharp eye out on your kid to make sure you didn't miss something. One great thing we got: an entertainment center from IKEA where the shelves for VCR/DVD/Stereo etc. are above the TV. No magnetic doors, no sliding doors, no glass doors to clean, but everything is out of baby's way!

ex-Californian, making my way on the East Coast with DS (10), DS (6) and WAHDH. Former extended BF'er, co-sleeper, and baby-wearer. Remembering how to garden.

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Old 01-22-2004, 05:03 AM
 
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I too found that once my daughter could walk, she was reaching and grabbing everything. It was exhausting following her around, putting everything back!

One really important thing is to keep all of the household cleaners (even the organic, environmentally sound stuff) in cabinets/shelves up high and out of reach. Even with a 'baby proof' latch, when you have to open the low cabinet to get something out, baby will be right there to grab something too! If it is dangerous, keep it out of reach.

For bookshelves, I found that by giving her the low shelf for her books/toys, then she was satisfied. It also helped to shove my books in the upper shelves so tightly that she can't pull them out (but I can). I often see her standing there playing with a book on the shelf that won't go anywhere.

I've also found that every month or so she can reach a new level, or try something new, so you have to keep up with it. But on the whole, once you've done the main work of making it safe, then you can turn your back for a few minutes. I almost always cook with my kitchen door closed, and then my daughter plays with her books in the area where we can see each other through the cut-out window. And I don't have to freak out if I can't see her for a couple of minutes.

I've also learned to be selective about what she could and couldn't touch. She knows that she can play with my computer because I keep the power strip turned off and she can't reach that! Don't always be saying "no touch" to things that could be safe.

Finally, Be consistant. Once they hear over and over that they really are not allowed to play with something, they'll move on to something else.

Peace,
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Old 01-23-2004, 04:56 AM
 
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We moved! I swear that was the only way we would have gotten so efficent so fast! At first it's hard to put all of your nice stuff away and have a coffee table with nothing on it and constantly remember to keep the bathroom door shut, but if you just put everything in your home at least 3 feet high you will be much happier! We mounted our CD and video racks on the wall. Also, keep lots of toys around. Good luck!
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