Not talking and just turned 2 - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 38 Old 08-11-2011, 07:03 PM - Thread Starter
 
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My son turned 2 on Aug. 5th.  He's not silent, but I don't really hear any clear words yet.  When he hands me something or wants me to hand him something he says "heh" I *think* maybe he means "here".  Stuff like that. He says "ad"  and I can't be sure but maybe he means "dad."  When he doesn't like something he says "nuh nuh nuh nuh nuh." I keep seeing things that say 2 year old should be able to say 2-3 word sentences?  I know all kids are different... but I'm just double checking.. he's fine right? lol

 

He seems to hear fine, like he comes when we call his name or when the vacuum turns on and he's in another room.  The other 2 year olds I know have huge vocabularies. (huge compared to him)

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#2 of 38 Old 08-11-2011, 07:18 PM
 
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I would suggest that you have him evaluated by a speech therapist.  If you are in the US, you can call your county's Early Intervention Program and have him evaluated for free by them.  The evaluations are play based.  They chat with you about what he is doing, and typically play with the kids with the parents present in your home.  It is very non-threatening and most kids have fun.  If they are not having fun, the therapists usually rely on parents for info so as to not push the kids too much. 

 

Also, not being able to communicate can become frustrating for kids, so you may want to start some simple signs with him so he can show he what he wants.  Most speech therapists agree that use of signs does not delay verbal communication in any way. 

 

As far as where he should be...yes, all kids develop at different rates, but typically to qualify for EI, a child would need to have 10 words or less at 18 months, and 50 or less at 24 months.  The typically developing one year old usually can say mama and dada specifically as well as one other word.  I know it can be scary (I have both worked in EI and had a child who required their services), but it is always best to seek services early rather than later.  If he ends up just being a "late talker", great.  You won't have lost anything by having him evaluated.  If he ends up having some speech issues, at least you will have started early to give him the best chance of catching up with his peers and developing his speech skills.  Good luck

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#3 of 38 Old 08-11-2011, 07:19 PM
 
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Thought of one other thing.... Has he had many ear infections? 

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#4 of 38 Old 08-11-2011, 07:26 PM
 
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My DS turns 2 this month and is in the same situation--without hearing loss--so I'll be interested to hear from other parents on this issue.  He seems really smart, otherwise.  He understands me--when I ask if he wants water, he'll run and grab a sippy cup to fill, and he can go get different toys on request.  He also "martian talks" a lot, but he can't do those "required" 2-3 sentences.  The other day at the library, I heard a little girl younger than he is conversing with her mom while doing a puzzle, "The cow goes there."

 

I'd freak out a little more if this were my first baby, but DD was also a late talker and is now on par with her 4-year-old peers.

 

Sorry.  You probably saw that someone else posted and got excited at the prospect of some productive advice.  bag.gif  But at least you know you're not alone...

 


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#5 of 38 Old 08-11-2011, 07:41 PM - Thread Starter
 
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lol turquesa you're fine, I appreciate any commentary as well :)

 

APtoddlermama, that's good to know. thanks!  he hasn't had any ear infections.  he hasn't even been sick before.  and like turquesa said.. he seems to understand me, he follows directions like "pick up the toy"  "put that in the garbage"  "bring that to daddy"  "take your plate to the kitchen"  and he seems to be good at mimicking actions and remembering routines, problem solving, stuff like that.  he just mostly babbles. I have a feeling he is saying something, but I have no idea what.

 

I bet he knows 50 words, but he is saying less than 10 and not one of them clearly. When he was born they tested his hearing and it was fine. I will bring it up at his 2 year old check up.

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#6 of 38 Old 08-11-2011, 10:14 PM
 
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I too have a 'late talker.' I never really noticed until she hit 2 and all the other 2 year old were chatting away and mine was still on single words and at nearly 3, she is still somewhat behind. Not behind the norm, but behind the average and her peers. If I were you, I would call Early Intervention and set up an appt. to have a speech language pathologist evaluate him. You can wait until his dr. appt. but with E.I. you can call and set it up yourself. If anything for the piece of mind and if he needs some help, get it now so he has time to catch up. He should have at least 50 words he can say, not 50 he can understand and that is considered the minimum in terms of his age and he should be also combining words into short sentence like ''more water'' ''look kitty.'' Its a great sign that he understands you, that is the most important aspect of language development.

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#7 of 38 Old 08-11-2011, 10:30 PM
 
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One of my DDs seemed to hear just fine, and never had ear infections. But our doctor had us take her in for a hearing check because because she had so little speech at age 2, and none of it was understandable.

 

She had chronic fluid in her ears. Her ears were completely full of fluid all the time. She could hear, but only very muddled. She had tubes and it made a HUGE difference.

 

I would recommend getting it check out -- getting a hearing check and a speech evaluation. It can't hurt and it might help.


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#8 of 38 Old 08-12-2011, 09:58 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post

 

She had chronic fluid in her ears. Her ears were completely full of fluid all the time. She could hear, but only very muddled. She had tubes and it made a HUGE difference.

 

I would recommend getting it check out -- getting a hearing check and a speech evaluation. It can't hurt and it might help.



That was what I was getting at too.  It is more common with ear infections but can happen other times and is like the kiddo is listening to speech under water, which obviously affects what they learn to say.

 

OP-- What he's understanding you say is called his receptive language, and what a child can say is their expressive language.  He should be able to understand much much more than he can say at this point.  I can't tell you an exact number of words he should understand off the top of my head, but it is way above 50.  And as far as the 50 words by 2, that is an absolute minimum.  Kids who don't have that many words by 2 pretty much automatically qualify for speech services as they are considered to have a 25% delay. 

 

I can promise you that you will hear countless stories of people whose kids just started talking on this board.  But, really, as someone who has worked in EI and someone who had a kiddo who wasn't just a late talker, I'd really strongly urge you to have him evaluated.  The other side of it is there are lot of kids who desperately need the assistance from a speech therapist.  In the grand scheme of things, what your describing is a pretty significant delay.  I don't want to scare you, because I have a 3.5 year old who has made amazing progress (though is still delayed) but I don't think you're dealing with a situation where a "wait and see" approach is going to be helpful. 

 

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#9 of 38 Old 08-12-2011, 10:09 AM
 
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Originally Posted by APToddlerMama View Post



 



That was what I was getting at too.  It is more common with ear infections but can happen other times and is like the kiddo is listening to speech under water, which obviously affects what they learn to say.

 

OP-- What he's understanding you say is called his receptive language, and what a child can say is their expressive language.  It isn't unusual for the receptive language to be higher than expressive language.  I can promise you that you will hear countless stories of people whose kids just started talking on this board.  But, really, as someone who has worked in EI and someone who had a kiddo who wasn't just a late talker, I'd really strongly urge you to have him evaluated.  The other side of it is there are lot of kids who desperately need the assistance from a speech therapist.  In the grand scheme of things, what your describing is a pretty significant delay.  I don't want to scare you, because I have a 3.5 year old who has made amazing progress (though is still delayed) but I don't think you're dealing with a situation where a "wait and see" approach is going to be helpful. 

 



My three year ols also wasn't just a late talker- he has done well with support and therapies, but at three, only family is likely to understand him and he is often frustrated when other people don't gt what he is trying to communicate.  While other kids are speaking in sentences- we are happy to have sentence fragments here.  Still, GREAT progress, and I know he wouldn't have done so well without EI and a lot of work from therapists and a lot of purposeful shaping of behavior and speech at home. 

 

Get an evaluation, if he qualifies- even if he is just a late talker- the support will be great and it certainly won't hurt. :)

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#10 of 38 Old 08-12-2011, 10:20 AM
 
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At 2, with no clear words, I would have him evaluated by a speech therapist. I am pretty relaxed about speech but that is late. Usually the first thing they do is have hearing testing.

 

Most states cover the cost of speech therapy but it takes some time to get into the program so call NOW. If has a big leap you might not need it but you don't want him left behind.

 

One of my nephews had a unaddresed serious speech delay that haunted him for years while in school. (Which is to say my mom really tried but my SIL did nothing.) Big size + poor language skills + lazy private school = poor relationship with learning.

 

It also was related to terrible terrible TERRIBLE tantrums at 2,3,4 because he could not make his needs known.

 

 

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#11 of 38 Old 08-13-2011, 09:46 PM
 
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I second getting him evaluated. if you get in touch with your Early Intervention program, they will arrange for that. and its not just speech therapy though.

my son hardly said any words at 2, and everyone kept telling me he's just a late talked, but my feeling was that its not as simple as that. i could "feel" that he wants to communicate better than he does. when we did the evaluation it turned it was something i didnt expect at all - he has mild low muscle tone that prevents him from being able to articulate clearly, although he does receive speech therapy, the focus is more on occupational therapy because its a neuro thing, and #1 recommendation from evaluation was to have him run a lot and jump and so on, basically provide a lot of sensory input. it has been about 4 months and i can see significant changes. it was amazing how quickly he started catching up with talking once we started doing everything we were advised. 

so if you feel like there can be something more to this than just "a late talker", definetely get an eval. Yes, it may be sort of scary, and we dont like to think that there might be sth "wrong", but it is a lot easier to "fix" these things now than later on

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#12 of 38 Old 08-16-2011, 04:03 AM
 
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what about if there are a few clear words but when the 2 year old speaks sentences it's incomprehensible (can make out vague impressions to get a general idea but not clear understanding of what the child wants/ is saying)?


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#13 of 38 Old 08-16-2011, 04:33 AM
 
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How much interaction does your son have with other children?

 

I was worried that our son didn't seem to talk much (mostly just "mama", "dada", and "da!" when pointing at what he wanted), but he's had a language explosion in the last few months (he's a bit over 2). Words, sentences, even pleasantries like "thank you"! He attends preschool two mornings a week and then playgroup one morning per week, and I think it's really helped.

 

We know a few children who are definitely ahead of him (though admittedly he has the added complexity of dealing with our bilingual household), but I'd say he's even a bit ahead of average now. He felt definitely behind prior to the past half year.

 

Not to say you shouldn't get him evaluated, but I thought I'd mention that spending time with other children can really help, too.


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#14 of 38 Old 08-16-2011, 05:16 AM
 
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Hi:  My son was not a big talker when I enrolled him in daycare at 22 months.  There was a kid in the class who was 2 months older and talked in full sentences.  Talk about intimidating!  The kid freaked me out!  So I got an eval done by a private speech therapist, and I was told he had severe speech delay and needed therapy twice a week.  She charged $50 per session, and she never even spoke to me to ask what he was like at home.  After a half hour with him, she claimed he didn't follow 2 step directions, that he didn't know body parts, and that he didn't make eye contact.  In his class, he did all of those things, and at home, he did as well.  Plus, he is shy around strangers.

 

In my gut, I knew she was wrong and just wanted the money.  $400 a month is a LOT OF MONEY for a total of 4 hours a month.  How much more could she do with that time that I couldn't do in many more hours of interaction?  Why didn't she talk to me about tips for working with him at home?  Besides, his classmate who spoke in sentences was the one who was off the curve, not my normal kid!  I really let myself get intimidated, which I found out later, pretty much all the other parents were, too.

 

Anyway, if your gut says that there is a problem, and he's not improving, then get an eval from the public program where they're not out to pad their pockets.  And ask them what you can be doing, too--a speech therapist is not the magic bullet....it's the work you do at home to reinforce it that will help him.

 

My son was ahead on all other development areas, just slower in speech, but his motor skills and facial muscle development are normal.  I was enabling him not to speak.  I stopped that, cut out the TV, read more to him, played with him, and noted improvements.  When I actually logged how many words he had, it was over 200.  He is now just over 2.5 years old, he is potty trained, understands everything I say to him, has many 2-word and some 3-word sentences, says the letters of the alphabet, can count to 13, says "thank you" and "please" without prompting...in other words, he has come around and enjoys talking.  Interestingly, potty training also really boosted his talking.

 

One thing I did that therapists do to help improve the words he already had was to look at him when I speak and have him look at me.  He would watch my mouth as I said words, and then his clarity improved.  So look at your kid when you're speaking, slow it down a little, and praise the effort.  

 

Good luck!  You're the mother, you know him best!

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#15 of 38 Old 08-16-2011, 05:44 AM
 
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DS1 did not talk until he was three, and even then, not much.  At his three-year check-up, his ped put in a referral and we had him evaluated a few months later.  He started speech therapy through the school district when school started in the fall.  He has made a *lot* of progress.  I am not sure if it was mostly time or not, but the speech therapy did help him with articulation.

 

When DS1 first went, he saw the speech pathologist alone for 30 minutes and went to a speech "preschool" once a week for two hours.  They even sent a bus to pick him up for the preschool, which he thought was the coolest thing ever.  We moved, changing school districts, so now he is in speech preschool twice a week with no one-on-one therapy.  He is probably borderline not qualifying at this point, but he loves it so much that we'll keep him in for the year.  When I visited the classroom, I was amazed at all of the things they cover in a preschool designed for speech (theme weeks with sensory, science, art and motor skill activities).  The teacher also put us in touch with the district's low-income preschool so he could attend "regular" preschool as well.  They also helped us set up his kindergarten screening.  Everything has been at no cost to us through the school district.

 

Another plus is that the focus on phonics has really made teaching DS1 to read easier - he already knew the sounds that the letters made.

 

DS2 just turned 2, and he is a lot further along than DS1 was at this age, but he seemed a little behind (has words and says two-word phrases but not sentences), so I had him evaluated as well after discussing it with our doctor.  At this point, the speech pathologist thought he wouldn't qualify, but she said that she would check back with us every few months to see where he is at.  She was particularly concerned if he was frustrated by not being able to communicate - she said that they try to intervene earlier if the child is having a tough time in that area.

 

I was hesitant at the beginning to have DS1 evaluated, but now I am so thankful that we did.  It has been a really good experience for him and he looks forward to going to speech preschool.


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#16 of 38 Old 08-16-2011, 06:04 AM
 
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When my dd was 2 she didn't say much either.  When she was 2.5 years we moved near family, she was only saying a few words if we could get them out of her.  We lived with my sister for awhile and she has 4 kids at that time ranging from 7 mos to 13 years old, so there was always a lot of talking.  A lot in the beginning we knew she could say words but just wouldn't if she wanted something.  Then my youngest niece started talking for her (somehow little kids know what other kids are trying to say, weird) so we had to keep reminding my niece to not talk for my daughter.  Before we lived with my sister for 3 months my dd was saying sentences, so we went from a few words to sentences before she turned 3.  I'm not saying that your child shouldn't get checked, its always good to do that to be on the safe side.  But you also have to not talk for them and maybe they are just learning at their own rate or maybe they just don't want to talk yet (my dd).  

 

Since my dd didn't want to talk I taught her some sign language for when she wanted things, it helped a lot.

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#17 of 38 Old 08-16-2011, 06:43 AM
 
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My daughter's dd1 turned two years old in March and still isn't talking. Last year she began saying a handful of words here and there but not always clearly. She seems to hear just fine and understands us. She will mostly verbalize like "uh uh uh uh". She says her 1 1/2 year old sister's name Amy as "Maymee". She calls her 6 year old brother "Bubba" like her parents do and can say dada and mama. According to her pediatrician she is almost off the charts as far as being very low weight plus she is short for her age. The dr said she is behind her peers 6 months as far as speech. She's a picky eater but she does eat, has plenty of energy and is a loving child. A speech evaluation has been scheduled which is for tomorrow actually so we'll see what the diagnosis will be.

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#18 of 38 Old 08-16-2011, 08:31 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post

One of my DDs seemed to hear just fine, and never had ear infections. But our doctor had us take her in for a hearing check because because she had so little speech at age 2, and none of it was understandable.

 

She had chronic fluid in her ears. Her ears were completely full of fluid all the time. She could hear, but only very muddled. She had tubes and it made a HUGE difference.

 

I would recommend getting it check out -- getting a hearing check and a speech evaluation. It can't hurt and it might help.


THIS! My DS had maybe 5-10 words at age 2. He heard the vacuum cleaner, and often reacted to us. But he was reacting to seeing us talk. So I thought he could hear. He had massive fluid in his ears. Like you being under water - you know how sound gets muted? Now imagine you are not under water but under pea soup. Can you fathom how bad and how little you would hear? 

Each time he got drains in his speech took off. He now has titanium drains and talks like a normal 6 yo. Took a good long while though, and I am sure he missed out. It became obvious after we had DD. She had tons of words at 12 months and sentences a few months later. It makes me really sad now to think what my DS missed out on because I did not realize what a hard time he was having. He missed out learning to hear, learning to talk, socially, so many ways. 

Not saying your DC has fluid in his ears or not, but absolutely get it checked out. Better to be wrong and have wasted time and money, then right and missed the opportunity to help your DC. 

 

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#19 of 38 Old 08-16-2011, 09:43 AM
 
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At 2 my DS#3 was not talking AT ALL.  Not bye bye or mama or dada.  We knew he could hear because he loved to be read to.  Would sit and listen to books as long as you would read.  But I had him evaluated anyway.  And 2 weeks before he started speech therapy he started talking and hasn't stopped since.  He does still go to speech because we like the therapists and it's free through the state. 

 

He now speaks in FULL sentences.  Like 6-8 word sentences.  We have a friend whose daughter is just a few weeks older than our son.  She was talking like crazy at christmas (she wasn't even 2 yet) and our son wasn't even saying anything.  But when we saw them in June, he had caught up to her and could be understood as well as she can...maybe better. 

 

So definitely get the medical stuff ruled out, but more than likely time will take care of this. 

 

Oh, and our son did a lot of other things early (like figuring out that if you plug something in it makes it go...at 12 months - that was scary).

 

Good luck!

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#20 of 38 Old 08-16-2011, 10:57 AM
 
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   I second (or fourth or fifth or whatever we are on lol) having your child evaluated by an early intervention just to be sure everything is going well.  That said, I also wouldn't worry too much.  I only said the word "No" when I was 2, and I tested as gifted when I was in middle school.  My husband didn't talk until he was about four(he had his own language from about 2-4 which he spoke with this sister.... they were very close in age and had the twin language thing going on), and both he and his sister were on the honor roll in high school.  They had other reasons for talking late where as I was just a late talker but I guess my point is that it isn't necessarily a bad sign if a child talks late.  Get it checked out, but don't worry yourself too much :-)!

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#21 of 38 Old 08-16-2011, 07:40 PM
 
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Having him evaluated wouldn't hurt of course, but I think you shouldn't worry about it much. It will come. I have one daughter, she will be 3 in January. She's been talking in sentences since she was 18 months. Now she is a non-stop chatter box! My nephews on the other hand, both older than she is by 2 months and by 6 months - barely talk, I can't understand them much. They have their own way of saying things, but not 'normal' words. But seeing their progress from when they didn't talk at all at 2 yrs old - they've come a long way. I think boys just start later in general, with some exceptions. I say don't worry! Get him evaluated for your peace of mind if you wish, but maybe you can wait a little. 

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#22 of 38 Old 08-16-2011, 10:58 PM
 
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I've only scanned the responses.

 

I picked up a language delay in my daughter at 11 months doing the ages and stages questionnaire http://pages.uoregon.edu/asqstudy/. At 12 months she was evaluated by early intervention and began speech therapy. She just turned 3 so is no longer part of EI, but she does continue with private speech therapy.

 

Here's the interesting part. When she was 2.5 I asked another mother whose son had been in speech therapy (but he no longer needed it,) "When did he start talking?" She said, "When we took him off gluten."

 

Hmmm...we decided to try that. Three weeks later our daughter's language took off. We didn't know if it was related or a coincidence. But, since we love a gluten free diet (and feel it is much healthier as long as you don't start eating processed gluten free foods) we decided to keep her on the diet. Then she found some pretzels in a park and we visited my mom and it took me forever to figure out where all the gluten was coming from. Over the course of a week she got lots of gluten and her language seemed to stagnate. 4 weeks after she was again gluten free her language soared.

 

She also has had frequent diarrhea since before one year of age. Long story short she had all kinds of evaluations (except celiac biopsy.) At 2 the specialist said it was probably Toddler Diarrhea and she should outgrow it by 4. After she went gluten free I read an online comment by a mom who said her son had both a speech delay and toddler diarrhea. She found out what food allergies he had, she took him off those foods, and both the diarrhea and the speech delay resolved. 

 

We had our daughter tested for allergies. We decided to remove all foods she was sensitive to and see what happened. After 6 weeks, nothing. Then we also took her off dairy. Suddenly it was no longer 4 diarrheas a day, but rather more normal poops. And her language again soared. We started reintroducing foods. Some she tolerated, others she did not. We are now gluten free, dairy free, cane sugar free, and tomato free. The tomato is a bummer and the cane sugar makes it hard to eat out. However, I am finding so many interesting and healthy foods that I am gaining weight.:P I even figured out how to make coconut ice cream in the freezer in a bowl.

 

The short story is, maybe remove gluten and see what happens. Give it a month to 6 weeks. I've talked to a number of people who are gluten sensitive and they all say their brains feel like they're in a fog when they eat gluten. We think that's what was happening to our daughter.


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#23 of 38 Old 08-17-2011, 04:16 AM
 
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I also had 3 out of 4 late talkers. One had caught up by 3, one around 5 - 6, and one still has a few delays (not in language, but we suspect other LDs).

 

Most likely ds is just fine. If it will make you feel better, start the early intervention process in your city.


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#24 of 38 Old 08-17-2011, 06:57 AM
 
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Hello,

 

I just wanted to say that both my brother and my dad were late talkers.  Neither of them really talked until they were four.  My mom says that my brother had 6 words when he turned 3, which is amazing to me now that I am a parent.  One of our family friends was concerned that he was retarded.  My mom's instincts told her that he was fine.  When he finally talked, he talked in full sentences.  BTW, now he has an equivalent of a PHD in education.  He is a very smart guy and he is probably the smartest guy in our family.  My dad didn't talk until he was four either and he was salutatorian of his HS class.  Which is not to say that if your child isn't talking, there couldn't be something wrong, but I think there are probably many cases when the child is just fine and just not ready. 

 

My brother is a good conversationalist now, but I would say that he is a much better listener than a talker.  He doesn't talk just for the sake of talking.  He doesn't talk unless he has something to say, but when he has something to say, it is usually worthwhile or some dry humor one-liner...lol!   I appreciate his thoughts and listening skills. Sometimes my family wonders if he just didn't have anything worthwhile to say yet.  He also had an older sister that knew what he wanted and could talk for him. 

 

I have been wondering if the late talker gene is going to show up somewhere in my family. 

 

Terja

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#25 of 38 Old 09-28-2011, 03:08 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Hi,

First, thank you all for the replies.  Having such a universal consensus definitely made me decide this wasn't just something I should "wait and see what happens" type scenario.  After the first few replies I called Early Intervention, they were very friendly and we set up an appointment for someone to come evaluate him at our house that week.  It went pretty well, she was friendly and our son seemed to like her.  She said his development seemed great in all areas besides communication.  He scored really low on the language part of it. 

 

So another appointment was set up with someone who was more of a specialist I think.  He liked this woman even more.  She said she thought both his language was delayed and cognitive skills as well.  Like paying attention.  He's just very busy all the time and doesn't want to sit and look at a book or flash cards.  She forwarded her tests to his pediatrician, and I set up his 2 year well child check. 

 

His pediatrician said his ears looked clear and healthy, no fluid.  She said he was healthy otherwise as well.  She wrote the referral to see a speech therapist and get a hearing test done.  We we able to see the speech therapist about 2 hours later, which was pretty cool.  Except... it ran into nap time and he really didn't want to do any of her tests.  He wanted to explore her office and get allllllll the toys out.  And then he cried very hard when it was time to go.  She said we could set up another appointment and try again.  He also didn't make a single sound during the whole appointment, but she said she understood that the one hour with him doesn't represent his whole life.

 

So we tried again the next week.  This time he wasn't as fussy but still didn't really follow any of her instructions and he still was being himself and wanted to explore everything.. like her laptop.  I told her if she wants his attention, we should be in a room with only things he's allowed to touch.  She said that at 2, he should be able to focus more.  I think he can focus, when he wants to.  She said she had enough information to give the results of her test.  I still haven't heard these results, but I am sure it's similar to everything everyone else has said.

 

The next morning we had the hearing test.  I was very nervous that he wouldn't want to do it.  It didn't go that bad really.  We started with the test that is the same as the infant hearing test.  She said the results she was seeing looked like maybe he had fluid in his ears. So then she did another test, that puts pressure on the eardrum and should move it back and forth.  She showed me a screen with a line graph and said it should have peaks and valleys, and his was a flat line, indicating that his ear drum was restricted. So then him and his dad went into a sound proof room with speakers and they played while she talked at different volumes and played different tones, and watched which ones he responded to.  She said he wasn't responding at any of the lower volumes that most people would respond to, and also that he wasn't responding to any of the higher or lower frequencies.  She said all 3 tests seemed consistent with what she would see with someone who had fluid on both sides of their ear drum.

 

I'm not sure why the pediatrician would say she saw no fluid, and then the audiologist would say that he could have fluid on both sides.  Maybe that's not the case?  So anyway, the next step is to talk to the pediatrician again and she what she recommends. 

 

I also never mentioned in my previous posts that I failed a hearing screening when I was young, maybe 4?  I ended up having fluid in my ears and had tubes put in, and then my hearing was fine.  The problem was mostly that the surgery was extremely traumatizing for me. I was afraid of doctors and hospitals until I was about 18 because of that, and I still get upset when I think back about my experience.  I realllllly don't want this to happen to my son.  So as you can imagine I am pretty sad/scared/upset thinking about him having the same surgery.  Although I am hoping my bad experience was because my parents didn't prepare me beforehand and didn't comfort me after.  The audiologist said that this problem tends to run in families because of face shape.  And we don't even know if this is the problem yet.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SundayCrepes View Post

Here's the interesting part. When she was 2.5 I asked another mother whose son had been in speech therapy (but he no longer needed it,) "When did he start talking?" She said, "When we took him off gluten."

 

Hmmm...we decided to try that. Three weeks later our daughter's language took off. We didn't know if it was related or a coincidence. But, since we love a gluten free diet (and feel it is much healthier as long as you don't start eating processed gluten free foods) we decided to keep her on the diet. Then she found some pretzels in a park and we visited my mom and it took me forever to figure out where all the gluten was coming from. Over the course of a week she got lots of gluten and her language seemed to stagnate. 4 weeks after she was again gluten free her language soared.

 

The short story is, maybe remove gluten and see what happens. Give it a month to 6 weeks. I've talked to a number of people who are gluten sensitive and they all say their brains feel like they're in a fog when they eat gluten. We think that's what was happening to our daughter.

 

After I read this post, I took him off gluten (this was before the hearing test).  What you say makes sense because I am the same way when I eat gluten, it's harder to think.  My son has no signs of any food allergies problems other than possibly this issue.  He has never had any digestive issues, but I thought it was worth a try anyway.  Within 1 week of stopping gluten, he had said about 5 new things, however they were not very clear like all his other words. (he started says "wuhhh, wuhhh" for "loves, loves."  I still thought it was progress.  By week 2, he'd said another 4-5 new things.  It may be a coincidence, who knows. I'll probably continue to at least limit his gluten intake.  Since I already eat gluten free, it was pretty easy to do the same for him.  I talked to the pediatrician about it, and she said "it certainly won't hurt, I'd try it."  I agree. Thanks for the suggestion :) 

 

After taking him off gluten I finally got to hear him say something pretty close to mama, but guess what? It means nurse. lol. I usually call it nursing, so I have no idea why he is saying that. He looks up at me and says "mama?" like he is asking permission to nurse (lol, I've never made him ask) and I'll be like "go ahead" and pulls my shirt down and latches on.  Even if he isn't calling me mama, it's still pretty adorable. I also saw him go into the fridge and look for food and say mama.  I guess mama means eat?

 

And thanks again to everyone for all the information and feedback!

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#26 of 38 Old 09-28-2011, 05:55 PM
 
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I'm glad you're getting help from the medical community. In many places medical care given to little kids is much more compassionate than it used to be, so maybe the tubes (if he doesn't need them) won't be so bad.

 

I'm glad you're seeing positives with the removal of gluten. My daughter also had toddler diarrhea. The specialist said she'd outgrow it by 4 or so. I read a mom somewhere whose kid had a speech delay and toddler diarrhea. She said she removed allergenic foods and both resolved. We did allergy testing and took our daughter off her sensitive foods. After 6 weeks no improvement in the diarrhea. Then we also removed all dairy. Within three days her diarrhea, which she'd had for 2.5 years stopped. We tried reintroducing sensitive foods. Some she tolerated, some she didn't. We're vegetarians. Now we're also gluten, dairy, cane sugar, and tomato free. (And except that we can't really eat out, I love the diet.) The thing is, when her poops solidified she had a huge burst in her language. It was amazing to watch how her food intake seems so closely related to her language.


Created an instant family (7/89 and 5/91) in 1997. Made a baby boy 12/05 adopted a baby girl 8/08. Ask me about tandem adoptive nursing. Now living as gluten, dairy, cane sugar, and tomato free vegetarians. Homeschooling and loving it.

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#27 of 38 Old 09-28-2011, 06:57 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I know what you mean SundayCrepes, after I stopped eating gluten and dairy I couldn't believe how many of my problems went away.  And now I can't eat rice or corn or anything with a lot of sugar either, so yeah... we can't eat out either.  Do you have any meals you cook that don't have rice or corn in them? lol, I'm looking for recipes, it's so tough. 

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#28 of 38 Old 09-28-2011, 09:34 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SomethingAnonymous View Post

I know what you mean SundayCrepes, after I stopped eating gluten and dairy I couldn't believe how many of my problems went away.  And now I can't eat rice or corn or anything with a lot of sugar either, so yeah... we can't eat out either.  Do you have any meals you cook that don't have rice or corn in them? lol, I'm looking for recipes, it's so tough. 



We're from Tucson and tortillas are a big part of our life. Here's a recipe for mung bean tortillas. http://spiceandmore.wordpress.com/2009/08/17/an-exciting-discovery/ I love the recipes made out of almond flour at www.elanaspantry.com.

 

Here's something I posted in the nutrition section. I do refer to rice pasta, but you can just ignore that (obviously.)

 

 

Here's one I got a great cream of broccoli soup recipe from http://glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.com/

 

vegan macaroni and cheese http://vegnews.com/web/articles/page.do?pageId=40&catId=10

 

coconut whipped cream http://cleangreensimple.com/2011/03/coconut-milk-whipped-cream/

 

tomato substitutes http://vegetalion.blogspot.com/2010/11/how-to-replace-nightshades-part-4.html

 

coconut milk yogurt (I haven't made this yet) http://www.smallfootprintfamily.com/2009/04/25/homemade-coconut-milk-yogurt/

 

pizza crust/flat bread http://gingerlemongirl.blogspot.com/2008/04/crusty-millet-flat-bread.html

 

vegan crepes http://mykidfoodallergies.com/index.php/recipes/2/43

 

cashew cheese (I avoid nutritional yeast since it's actually like MSG.) Can't remember if I made this recipe http://www.purplecarrotkc.com/2011/07/easy-cashew-cheese.html

 

So, if you have something you want to make, just google it...gluten free potato soup recipe came up with more than 2 million hits.

 

Oh, we use Tinkyada brown rice pasta. Just don't cook per package directions. I cook about 8 minutes. Shells 6-7 minutes.

 

And these crackers original flavor are gluten, dairy and cane sugar free http://www.crunchmaster.com/products/multiseed.aspx They sell them at our costco store, though I don't see them online.

 

Here's books I like:

 

http://www.amazon.com/Gluten-Free-Vegan-Delicious-Animal-Free-Recipes/dp/1600940323/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1316670756&sr=1-1

 

http://www.amazon.com/Gluten-Free-Almond-Flour-Cookbook/dp/158761345X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1316670702&sr=8-1

 

http://www.amazon.com/Cooking-Coconut-Flour-Gluten-Free-Alternative/dp/0941599639/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1316670722&sr=1-2

 


Created an instant family (7/89 and 5/91) in 1997. Made a baby boy 12/05 adopted a baby girl 8/08. Ask me about tandem adoptive nursing. Now living as gluten, dairy, cane sugar, and tomato free vegetarians. Homeschooling and loving it.

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#29 of 38 Old 09-30-2011, 06:51 PM
 
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I would talk to peditrician about having his hearing tested. and also call early intervention and have them eval him. they can help you out alot.


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#30 of 38 Old 10-01-2011, 01:47 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:

Originally Posted by kayleesmom View Post

I would talk to peditrician about having his hearing tested. and also call early intervention and have them eval him. they can help you out alot.


I posted above that I've done both. Thanks.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SundayCrepes View Post

We're from Tucson and tortillas are a big part of our life. Here's a recipe for mung bean tortillas. http://spiceandmore.wordpress.com/2009/08/17/an-exciting-discovery/ I love the recipes made out of almond flour at www.elanaspantry.com.

 

Here's something I posted in the nutrition section. I do refer to rice pasta, but you can just ignore that (obviously.)

 

 

Here's one I got a great cream of broccoli soup recipe from http://glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.com/

 

vegan macaroni and cheese http://vegnews.com/web/articles/page.do?pageId=40&catId=10



Thanks so much! you're awesome :)

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