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#31 of 42 Old 05-11-2012, 02:05 PM
 
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I would say not to worry. At two, it is waaaaay too early to tell if your son is simply just developing at his own pace or if there might be some problem that needs tending to. From your descriptions, I would assume his problem is probably just wrestling with too many words, and variations of sounds, and not really being delayed at all.

 

At age two, I couldn't speak. Or well, I made sounds that my parents managed to decode somehow into one-two word messages. Such as "get shoe" "look kitty" etc. even if they came out all mixed up and strange. It didn't worry my physician, because she saw no signs of anything being wrong. My hearing, my understanding, attention etc. were all fine.

 

At age five, I could speak. But I stuttered and stammered. My physician was still not concerned, but my parents let themselves be worried by the special-aid teacher, who helped children with development delays in school, who suggested there might be something wrong since my speech was worse than some of the students she was helping.

 

Well, my parents booked a time with a child speech development specialist at the hospital. Just to be on the safe side. Her verdict?

 

I knew too many words. My stuttering and stammering was due not to a speech difficulty, as the teacher had assumed, but rather language proficiency. I knew an amazing number of words (and especially synonyms) for my age. My young brain was simply not up to the task of quickly finding the word I was after, and so I stuttered and stammered while it searched for the right word. She said that as my brain matured it would sort itself out, and it did. Today I have no problems whatsoever with talking. In fact, some people would wish I talked a bit less!

 

In any case, I just wanted to share my story since I think it is important to remember that "development difficulties" can sometimes be a sign of something good. It might be that your son is actually learning language faster than his young, still maturing brain can handle.

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#32 of 42 Old 05-18-2012, 10:34 AM - Thread Starter
 
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So, his vocabulary is growing every day. He is learning to do new things every day. He is getting better with a fork, he kicks his ball further all the time,climbs the stairs without holding on to a thing. He points at his favourite things in his favourite books and looks up at me to name them for him.

 

Today he went for his second last speech therapy session with his dad. His dad came home and said that he was clumsy putting the pegs into the holes and she recos a physiotherapist

 

So, now the team of experts is: Occupational Therapist, Physiotherapist, Speech Therapist and Developmental Pedicatrician.

 

I am totally comfortable with the Dev Pediatrician

 

I have to say, it could be PMS fueling this, but I AM FURIOUS. He is TWENTY FOUR MONTHS OLD!

 

I am fuming, emotional, bewildered....I just want to cry now.

 

I have to keep reminding myself that people are only looking out for him

 

He looks as big as a 3 or 4 year old.  But he is not developmentally where a 24 month old should be (I guess, but to me he seems normal)

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#33 of 42 Old 05-18-2012, 03:11 PM
 
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ds2 didnt really start talking until after age 3.  he's perfectly normal, just a late talker
 


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#34 of 42 Old 05-18-2012, 03:32 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Tina Dun View Post

So, his vocabulary is growing every day. He is learning to do new things every day. He is getting better with a fork, he kicks his ball further all the time,climbs the stairs without holding on to a thing. He points at his favourite things in his favourite books and looks up at me to name them for him.

 

Today he went for his second last speech therapy session with his dad. His dad came home and said that he was clumsy putting the pegs into the holes and she recos a physiotherapist

 

So, now the team of experts is: Occupational Therapist, Physiotherapist, Speech Therapist and Developmental Pedicatrician.

 

I am totally comfortable with the Dev Pediatrician

 

I have to say, it could be PMS fueling this, but I AM FURIOUS. He is TWENTY FOUR MONTHS OLD!

 

I am fuming, emotional, bewildered....I just want to cry now.

 

I have to keep reminding myself that people are only looking out for him

 

He looks as big as a 3 or 4 year old.  But he is not developmentally where a 24 month old should be (I guess, but to me he seems normal)

 

It's strange, of course I haven't seen your child and am in no place to judge, but, aside from the speech issue, I haven't heard anything that sounds too different from my 25 month old.  She can't climb stairs unassisted yet, is very good at puzzles, but still definitely needs to twist the pieces around a bit before getting them in properly, is proficiently sloppy at eating with a spoon and fork... I would be completely bewildered if I was told she was delayed.  Have you considered...just not going through with some of the therapies yet?  Could you plan to give it all a few more months to play itself out and then reassess?  (Forgive me if you've already addressed that question elsewhere in the thread.)

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#35 of 42 Old 05-19-2012, 02:54 AM
 
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Ok here's my story and I hope hearing it helps.  My oldest son who is now just about to turn 4 was a very late talker.  When he was two he had zero words...well he did say 'Mum' but it could mean anything from me to milk to 'I want that over there'.  So besides 'mum' he would go 'ehhh' and point to communicate.  That's it and it continued that way until he was just about 3 when he finally started to say some words.  Now he is just about to turn 4 and when I look at the video of him at his 3rd birthday it's so hard to believe how much his speech has improved in one year.  

 

My doctor was VERY concerned and had us take him to someone to get assessed when he was about 2 1/2 - he had his hearing tested and we met with a speech pathologist who said there was nothing wrong and that he was just taking his time to talk.  I finally chilled out when I discovered the book The Einstein Syndrom: Bright Children Who Talk Late by Thomas Sowell.  There is nothing I can say about the book that hasn't been said already by the reviews on Amazon.com so I won't go into it but you should definitely check it out - especially if there are scientists or engineers in your family.  

 

My son is still WAY further behind in speech than his peers but I don't worry, I know he will catch up.  We all just develop at different times and I think that 99% of the time there is no big problem associated with speech delay (except in kids who are having other signs of developmental delays).  Try not to worry or put pressure on him - it's extremely likely that sometime, when he is ready, you will be able to have a good conversation with him and find out what's been happening in his little head :)

 

Take care :)

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#36 of 42 Old 05-20-2012, 04:24 PM
 
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A couple of thoughts...

1.  In my experience as a teacher working with kids with autism, echolalia rarely involves speech from another person in the child's life.  The "scripts" ( the things the child repeats) usually come from movies, cartoons, TV commercials, and so forth.  They hardly ever come from interactions with a caregiver.  

Thinking of a student I had a few years back who was the poster child for echolalia, he usually said things like:

Wascally wabbit (Elmer Fudd)

That's all folks (Looney Tunes)

"I'm cross" (Thomas)

(Goofy says Gawsh) (Disney)

Watch your step! (from some YouTube video he liked to watch)
 

Shhh, I'm hunting wabbits.  (Elmer Fudd)

These were things he'd say throughout the day and they were completely at random (no obvious contextual triggers), although the frequency appeared to increase when the student was stressed/agitated. 


2. Hand flapping, spinning, repetitive movements, stimming etc. are usually associated with the more severe/pervasive types of autism.  Kids with Asperger's for instance don't usually have these traits, or if they do, they're very minor compared to the kids with more pronounced autism.  You can't rule out autism spectrum disorders completely with the absence of these traits, but you can probably rule out the more severe types of autism.

3.  There many developmental delays besides Autism.  I don't know if I'd recommend driving yourself crazy researching them all.  If you're concerned about a true development delay (beyond delayed speech), you may want to see a developmental pediatrician (or whatever the Canadian equivalent is) and do a Global Developmental Screen or a non-verbal IQ test (note there's validity problems with a child this age) and rule some things out. 

Good luck figuring all of this out.  It sounds like at a minimum, the person you are currently working with is not a good match for your child, and you may want to see if there's another service provider you can work with.  Another thing to remember is that without clear cut symptoms of a major developmental disorder, it's hard to diagnose much of anything until a child is between 4-6.  Before that's you're stabbing around blindly in the dark.

 

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#37 of 42 Old 05-20-2012, 06:11 PM
 
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2 of my nephews are the same way. One didn't talk more than grunting and a stray babble here and there until he was 3. His sister had started to talk at 1, in full sentences. He's fine at nearly 5. My other nephew is almost 2 and mostly just bringing things to people, pointing and grunting, but he's really doing well otherwise. My Mom said one of my brothers were the same way. He's now 30 and doing great. He has NO problem talking, it's the shutting up part that's difficult.... orngbiggrin.gif


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#38 of 42 Old 05-21-2012, 11:49 AM
 
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He's in a multi-lingual environment? Often speech is delayed in multi-lingual kids, though its not usually a bad thing, they are just trying to figure out which words and grammatical rules to use with which language...be patient, if there is no significant change in the next 6-9 months, then reevaluate.

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#39 of 42 Old 05-22-2012, 08:21 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks. I'm sorry, My post was very reactionary - I was really unhappy.

 

We have one more session with this speech pathologist and then we are done.

 

The good thing is - he is starting to talk, not just saying "banana" when he sees a banana etc (he can name a lot of things) but actually communicating his needs. Telling us he is hungry by walking up to his chair and saying "hungy" and telling us he is done with taking a bath, or asking us to read a book to him, all in simple terms of course. And I find he understands more. I say "Hey, wanna play puzzle?" and he goes right to the drawer where his puzzles are and grab one and bring it over. Same with "can I have a hug? Kiss? Want to go outside? Upstairs? Take a bath? Go to bed?" He understands and acts on all of it

 

I know I am being an overly reactionary mom. I know the Speech Therapist is doing her job. And its not her fault that he talks at home and not in the brief sessions with her.

 

I am really struggling with all of this because I believe he is okay, he is just growing and developing at his own pace. But then I see something, like if I say "Show me the carrot!" in his book and he doesn't do it, and I am full of doubts and fears...and then I am conflicted. Should I follow my gut? Or is "my gut" confused?

 

I know he doesn't understand as much as my cousin's 24 month old (who also doesn't speak, in fact, speaks even less than my son) but if you say to him, "Go get your milk, I am busy" He will go to the fridge, and grab his bottle of milk. My guy wouldn't do that. But I guess because he is learning every single day, I believe he WILL do all that kind of stuff. Maybe just a month or two later than his cousin.

 

Its so hard...as a mom to look at your son and see a sensitive, loving boy with a sense of humour and a zest for life - who is SO full of laughter, and believe "there is something wrong here, he needs to see a gang of specialists" But I think thats because I am his mom

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#40 of 42 Old 06-19-2012, 11:16 AM
 
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Can you please contact me regarding your son's delayed speech?

 

My daughter is 3 now started like your son, they said the same thing about her, but i want to exchange with you all her progress.

You sound like me...and you explained your child like my daughter exactly.

I live in Canada as well...

email is patel.sarfaraz@ymail.com

 

Thanks,

Samy

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#41 of 42 Old 06-19-2012, 05:55 PM
 
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Originally Posted by RStelle View Post

Hi, sorry if someone all ready said this (I didn't have time to read everyone's posts) but when children are growing up learning more than one language they often, if not always, speak late. It is totally normal, judging from that I don't think your son is even behind at all. It sound like he is right on track for someone learning 3 languages at once!
 

 

Yes, this is so true!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tina Dun View Post

So, his vocabulary is growing every day. He is learning to do new things every day. He is getting better with a fork, he kicks his ball further all the time,climbs the stairs without holding on to a thing. He points at his favourite things in his favourite books and looks up at me to name them for him.

 

Today he went for his second last speech therapy session with his dad. His dad came home and said that he was clumsy putting the pegs into the holes and she recos a physiotherapist

 

So, now the team of experts is: Occupational Therapist, Physiotherapist, Speech Therapist and Developmental Pedicatrician.

 

I am totally comfortable with the Dev Pediatrician

 

 

Hmmm. Just a hunch but it sounds like your son does NOT like his ST and to top it off, doesn't feel the need to pretend like he does in front of his dad. 

 

One of my good friends is married to a native Spanish speaker, so mom speaks English and dad speaks primarily Spanish to their kids, and they've taught their oldest a variety of baby signs since he was an infant. Their oldest is about to turn 3 yrs old. She has brought him to my house many times and around when he turned 2 yrs old, was saying the same thing. His "first steps" speech therapist was saying his language is behind. I've spent most of my career working with bilingual children and deaf/hard of hearing children, so I am used to looking for clues as to what is really going on. After hanging out with them several times, I told her that her son seems absolutely normal, and that he is shy with new people, therefore he doesn't talk much when out in public or while with his speech therapist because he doesn't feel comfortable. He understood absolutely everything that mom and dad said to him, and could easily follow instructions. He seemed so perfectly normal, I told her I was willing to bet he could do everything the therapist asked of him if he ever got the nerve up. 

 

Well, after much worrying and discussing with his doctor and trying to figure out what else it might be, one day he shocked everyone's socks off and performed like he was getting paid. He said all the words he's supposed to know in English, Spanish, and signed them. A week or two later he was not talking again to anyone except mom and dad. It was just his own way, and a big part of it was how much attention he got when everyone was in a tizzy all worried about him, and trying to get him to talk. What a racket.

 

 

My own DD is just 24 mos old, and doesn't say a ton of words, but loves to ask me to say them. She's very sharp, and able to understand what's going on around her as well as any other child her age, but she doesn't say nearly as many words as some 2 yr olds I know. I don't worry about it. She's very visual, as am I, and she's very interested/curious/enthusiastic about everything (except brushing her teeth). One of my neighbors has a 26 mo old who has been labeled as "failure to thrive" and "speech delayed", but she is a CHATTERBOX and says way more words than DD does. She pointed across a pond one day and yelled "turtle!". My DD knows "a dog", "a kee!" (kitty), "bird" and "cow", "hi!!", "bye!!" "ball" "go pway?" and new this week is "a car", "uh oh, OH NO!", and "tickle tickle tickle!" Other than that she doesn't say a lot that is understandable. I think "eeban" = I want, "co co" = the verb "to color", "baboo" = "blue" and "co call" = "what color is that?", and sometimes if I'm lucky, she will say "Mamie!!"

 

But she understands a TON of other things, and has many ways to communicate with me.

 

When she's hungry, she pushes her hands into her hollow tummy. When she wants down from her high chair, she stomps her feet alternatingly. 

 

If someone were to tell me she is delayed right now, I would laugh. Everyday there is some new thing she says or does that shows me how rapidly she is growing and developing. Everyday I have to be on my toes. We have so much fun together. I'm not one bit worried about her. She's a happy healthy kid.

 

It could be the speech teacher is more worried about getting children labeled and pushed into the system with a diagnosis, than she is with the quality of the lives she encounters. 


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#42 of 42 Old 07-01-2012, 08:38 PM
 
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Ahhh I really feel for you! Not because I think there is anything wrong with your son (from what you've described) but because I have been there and know what it is like to worry about your child's development, read the internet, one day think they're fine, the next worry again...

 

My DS is almost 3 and a year ago I was exactly in your shoes. By the time he was 24 months old he had maybe 10-15 words. He understood what we were saying to him, he played properly, was affectionate, good eye contact... a little on the shy side though, didn't play with other kids... And this last point was exactly why the word "autism" kept coming up so much! I posted something here on the "special needs" page where I detailed my DS's behaviour as much as I could and most people thought there was nothing wrong with him. But then you get  the odd person who says "evaluate him" and I would start wondering again.

 

Anyway... fast track 12 months - he is a normal 3 year old. Still shy and a sensitive soul but is talking in sentences in three different languages. He has started going to daycare which is helping him overcome his shyness and once he earns someone's trust he relaxes and communicates with them and plays with them. I shouldn't be surprised though because at his age I was exactly like him.

 

And I would agree with those who say that the reason he's not following instructions probably has more to do with the fact that he doesn't like the speech therapist. Just as an example, we are taking part in some long term research of growing up in New Zealand and someone comes every year to check on DS and interact with him. At his 2 year appointment they wanted to get him to stack blocks one on top of the other and then smash them. Well, he wouldn't no matter how much this woman tried (and despite the fact that I knew he could do it and even more). And then, as soon as she wasn't looking, he did exactly what she asked.

 

Our DS has some quirks in that he seems more sensitive than other boys his age... or even than our second DS. But it's just who he is and DH and I keep joking that he'll probably be an artist. But even at this age he is able to show empathy which is amazing. For example, recently I hurt my toe and he ran for help and then ran back and gave me big cuddles and said "Mama hurt her toe... toe hurts!".

 

It is important to remember that most people are extroverts... only 10% of us are introverted. So it is no surprise that your DS's therapist doesn't encounter kids like him very often (let alone kids who are learning 3 languages)!

 

I would say wait and see. I know I'll probably be slammed because everyone these days is worried about missing that "development" train, but it seems to me that your original gut feeling is telling you your DS is okay. And I would go with that. Despite the fact that, because of all the info out there, your gut feeling got a bit lost and confused along the way.

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