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#31 of 50 Old 05-14-2012, 06:27 AM
 
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I was curious to know what your personal experience with labels is? It seems to be a trigger for you, and probably for good reason.


Homeschooling mama to 6 year old DD.

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#32 of 50 Old 05-14-2012, 06:47 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by Daffodil View Post

 It's not like they're going to actually stick a physical label on her and make her wear it for life.

 

laohaire - this is what triggered my response to label. I mean - seriously?

 

Okay, thank you for the responses that were answering my question, they are greatly appreciated. To everyone else who wants to accuse me of disliking people with developmental problems maybe I'm not the sensitive one to the word "labels", think about that. I don't even think I was the first one to use that word in this thread. Thank you for reminding me again why I left MDC in the first place because all you people want to do is argue.


hammer.gif Homeschooling the animal lover DD1 (8/06), chasing the free spirit DD2 (12/07), and tracking the ninja DD3 (5/09), angel1.gif 10/9, angel1.gif 9/11, angel1.gif 11/11 with the poor estrogen immersed DH (10/03) dizzy.gif

 

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#33 of 50 Old 05-14-2012, 07:04 AM
 
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I have really mixed feelings about this whole conversation. On one hand, I definitely admire you allowing your child to develop at her own pace. I don't like children being put on time tables where they have to be able to do X by Y age. I am in total agreement there.

On the other hand, while neither of my children were late with speech, I know so many parents whose kids have had speech therapy and have been helped by it. But in a lot of those cases, the kids were becoming frustrated and were hitting/biting due to the frustration. But anyway, what I was wanting to get at is that a few of these kids ended up having hearing or developmental problems/labels, but most just went because their speech was behind and never had any other label put on them and had no other problems. It was just late speech.

I don't recall you saying that she was becoming frustrated to the point of hitting/biting. It might be a good idea to take her in to get her speech evaluated if she gets frustrated at some point.

I think speech therapists give families exercises to do with their kids - nothing that takes long but little things like saying "I put the pink pony in my purse" back and forth. I guess you could try having her repeat phrases that work on specific sounds with you and see if that helps.

I do hope you'll try to stay open minded about the idea of speech therapy. It isn't a bad thing, even if you aren't seeing a need now, and it might be a good idea to keep it open as a possibility if working with her doesn't move things along as you'd like.
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#34 of 50 Old 05-14-2012, 07:15 AM
 
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Thank you for reminding me again why I left MDC in the first place because all you people want to do is argue.

 

No, we don't.

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#35 of 50 Old 05-14-2012, 07:19 AM
 
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laohaire - this is what triggered my response to label. I mean - seriously?

 

Okay, thank you for the responses that were answering my question, they are greatly appreciated. To everyone else who wants to accuse me of disliking people with developmental problems maybe I'm not the sensitive one to the word "labels", think about that. I don't even think I was the first one to use that word in this thread. Thank you for reminding me again why I left MDC in the first place because all you people want to do is argue.

 

Wow. People have, granted, been telling you things you don't want to hear. But that is not rude.

 

This, on the other hand, is seriously, shockingly rude:

 

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Look, I'm sorry your kid has developemental problems, but that's no reason for you to be rude and yes you are saying "it's not normal, better start therapy."

 

There is a very good reason why I said it "almost" (and at this point I would change that to "clearly") sounds like you are saying there is something wrong with having special needs. It wasn't an attack, it was based on your words, right there above. You were very, very rude to that poster and frankly you owe her a sincere apology.

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#36 of 50 Old 05-14-2012, 07:23 AM
 
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I don't think anyone means to argue. I think some people here have had very different experiences from speech therapy than it sounds like you're expecting, and are trying to let you know how their experiences differ from your expectations. It sounds like an argument is starting though, and I hope it stops or the thread could get closed.
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#37 of 50 Old 05-14-2012, 07:23 AM
 
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Also, you didn't answer my question (not that you are required to, obviously, but in case you thought you did answer my question).

 

I was thinking you must have had some personal, negative experience with labels in your own life. Perhaps that is something to explore.

 

Your quote from Daffodil is not the personal experience. It was apparently a trigger for you, and I was curious as to why.

 

There are some very valid issues with labels. It would be helpful perhaps for you to explore the reason for the trigger in more detail, so you can sort out what is a valid issue and what only looks like it but is not. There are situations where a child does not fit into a mold, and I'm on your side that it's detrimental to the child to try. But there are also situations where the child needs (and wants, and would thrive on) help. It would be a tremendous shame to add the latter into the former group.


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#38 of 50 Old 05-14-2012, 07:30 AM
 
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I have not read the whole thread. I would check it out with a speech therapist though, just to know what's going on. Even if someone suggests speech therapy, it doesn't mean you have to do it. Or if they seem really interventionist and you don't think you need it, you can look for a second opinion, or ignore it too. They might give you some things you can try regardless.

 

My younger child's language is still fairly indistinct. People close to him (me, DD, DH, the sitter, relatives, frequently-seen friends) know what he's saying, but some things are just not at all decipherable by other people. Last year, his preschool teachers noted this, said to encourage him to model articulation of words he uses a lot (he said "feet" for "sweet", and it was a reasonably-frequent word, so I worked on emphasizing "sw" versus "f" when saying it, and even showed him how to position his tongue to say "sw". But mostly, his teachers said it would likely progress on it's own, and just to keep an eye on it and discuss again this year. So, we've now "discussed it again." It's still not super clear, some words are better, some are not. We have a referral for a speech therapist, just to see what's up. 


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#39 of 50 Old 05-14-2012, 07:40 AM
 
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This might be a useful resource, from a SLP turned homeschooling mom: http://www.hiphomeschoolmoms.com/2012/01/speech-language-therapy-the-homeschooler/

 

Her series on "things to do at home" seems like something you might be able to use, in particular: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Brighton-Park/171983872813430


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#40 of 50 Old 05-14-2012, 08:24 AM
 
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We just moved we had workers coming and going for weeks she did not want to be anywhere near them. There were a couple of them that we knew from my sister. We visited with them and I tried to get her friendly with them, they were here two days, she didn't want anything to do with them! And one of them has kids the same ages as mine, it's not like they were big scary people that didn't know how to talk to children. She made me hold her the entire time we were near any of them and wouldn't say a word. The gymnastics teacher is friendly and wonderful with kids, used to run her own daycare, it still took months for her to decide she liked her.

 

I can understand this. My 6 yo was EXTREMELY shy up until last year. She wouldn't talk to strangers or look them in the eye when they talked to her. She wouldn't let her preschool teacher touch her (i.e. put a loving arm around her while helping her with something). And when we went to visit family for 2 months she wouldn't let anybody hug her or hold her despite the fact they were family and we saw them everyday. Most wouldn't understand that but I did. B/c outside of these situations she was a very loving and talkative child. She was just extremely shy and particular about who she let in her personal space. Thankfully she has outgrown it and/or come out of her shell and now she will go up to strangers and strike up conversations. I think most medical professionals understand that kids (especially the little ones) can be shy and not going to necessarily speak until they develop a good rapport with them. 

 

I also believe in kids developing at their own pace in the terms of not rushing them to learn something they aren't ready for. Being a late talker isn't necessarily a bad thing. Some kids will go from no talking to opening their mouths one day speaking in full sentences at the age of 4. That said, with the frustration and anger your dd is showing b/c of her difficulties in communicating, in combination with the limited number of words and phrases is cause for concern. What you are looking for are ways to help her that a speech therapist would actually be able to do for you and it would be tailored to your child's specific needs. 

 

And fwiw my older dd was a late talker and had unclear speech. She would pass hearing tests but when she had a tympanogram done she failed and was found to have fluid in her middle ear which was impeding effective hearing and explained why we couldn't understand her gibberish talking.

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#41 of 50 Old 05-14-2012, 09:58 AM
 
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OP, I am VERY sympathetic to your issue with labels. 

 

But 2 things I want to say:

 

1) As the mother of a boy who was mislabeled and HARMED by that mislabel, I totally get it.

 

Just some back story - as I mentioned DS has a severe language disorder, receptive and expressive.  Which means he, unlike your DD, does not understand much of what is said to him.  This means that for a long time he didn't respond to his name, often ignored people, seemed off in his own world when not around people he knew, etc.  A lot of red flags for autism.  He was unofficially labeled as being on the spectrum by every specialist that worked with him and they treated him as such.  So he wasn't officially labeled but for all practical purposes was given an ASD diagnosis. 

 

The harm was done by the methods that virtually every therapist and expert we dealt with applied to his treatment.  They all used what is called ABA methodology, a behavioral approach developed for children on the spectrum.  Because most kids on the spectrum lack the will to communicate and are not motivated by social constraints, ABA uses drilling and a very simple reward/punishment structure.  They sit kids at a table and DO force them to drill.  This can be very effective and helpful for children on the spectrum but was DISASTROUS for DS.  He withdrew emotionally and started tantruming often.  These tantrums were seen by the experts as further proof of his inability to "deal with stress or participate in things he does not want to."  Bad cycle!  That went on for about 3 months and I regret those months with every fiber of my being. 

 

It was when he was about 2.5 that I began to seriously question his diagnosis and got on the waiting list for a development pediatrician.  Around that time, the psychologist at the special ed preschool we had DS in called me in to ask about his diagnosis.  She also doubted that he was on the spectrum which gave me some confidence in my own observations and I pulled him out of the ABA based school.  His tantrums literally stopped the day I told him we weren't going back to school. 

 

We saw the Dr when DS was almost 3 and she was initially confused by his mix of ASD-like behaviors coupled with many things incompatible with an ASD diagnosis.  She saw him 4 times in a variety of environments and said by the end that he was 100% not on the spectrum and, instead, has a language disorder (which can easily be mistaken for ASD by those not used to looking for anything else).  DH and I completely agree with this as it explains all his behaviors!

 

My point being that there CAN be down sides to evaluations and early intervention.  There is often a rush to label that really can be problematic. 

 

2) That all said, I now know that the kinds of therapy he was getting is NOT what most kids with language issues should receive.  In fact, before 3 or 4 years old, all children should be getting what is called play-based, child-led therapy.  This kind of therapy (also often called floortime) is literally like playing for the kids.  The EI in our area is just kind of caught in the 70s when it comes to using ABA therapy ofr young children.  I feel like your impression of therapy in general is very "ABA-ish" and that is not at all what DS gets now. 

 

DS now has a speech therapist come to our house twice a week and she literally just plays with him.  But in ways they help him talk more.  He LOVES when she comes and looks forward to it.  She also spends a lot of time helping me learn and practice techniques that I can use in our every day lives.  Because honestly 2 sessions a week aren't what are really going to make a difference for DS.  Instead, my ability to work with the speech therapist, reinforcing things and maintaining certain types of interaction are why DS is REALLY improving now.  Having the help of our speech therapist has made a big difference for me, helping me to better help my DS.

 

Like I said, you know your DD and I do not judge any decisions you make about her.  But I do hope you make those decisions based on good information and it sounds to me like you maybe have an incorrect impression of what speech therapy has to entail.  Like I said above, I definitely understand your fear of wrong labels and bad therapy.  It really is important to find the right people to help you and your little one.  But, with the right help, things can get much better, very quickly.  You could even just hire a speech therapist to help you.  She never even really needs to work with your DD (though she would have to see her at least enough to get a sense of what kinds of things might help her).  Instead you could tell the therapist from the get go that you want some expert advice how to work with DD yourself.  Any good, play-based therapist will be able to help (just make sure up front that they use only play-based approaches).  The other option is to look for Hanen training in your area.  This is a class that teaches YOU how to be your child's therapist.  That class uses the "It Takes Two To Talk" book I suggested (which I haven't found anywhere for less then 65$!! bleh) as its text book and it is really good at helping you come up with techniques that can be tailored to your DD's specific strengths and weaknesses.  I took this course and it was paid for entirely by our Early Intervention system (after I got pretty pissed about the way DS was treated but I know many school districts and EI folks will pay for this kind of thing). 

 

No matter what, I definitely understand how frustrating it can be sometimes to not be able to communicate well with your little one.  As a total aside, and I'm definitely NOT trying to diagnose your DD since I have clearly never met her and have only very bare bones description of her language, but your description is really text book verbal apraxia.  Laughing at language demands and the appearance of just not wanting to talk are actually 2 of the things our dev ped listed when she was trying to determine if DS has this issue (which he might, though it is not clear because of his receptive delays).  These are called avoidance strategies.  Another red flag for verbal apraxia is the ability to talk well in other modes - like singing.  Because singing uses a different part of the brain, many apraxic kids who can't talk very well, can in fact have whole conversations by singing what they want to say.  Many parents of children with verbal apraxia believe that their children are just stubborn and "won't talk," especially because they are clearly smart and not delayed in any other way.  I'm not saying that is what is up with your DD, but I do want you to know that the things you describe are very suggestive. 

 

But no matter what is going on with your little one, I can't imagine a little therapy with the right person hurting and, who knows, it might help?  No matter what choices you make, I support your right to make them without any judgement from me and wish you and your DD the best.

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#42 of 50 Old 05-14-2012, 10:15 AM
 
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I'm going to throw this out there for you to chew on.  Your daughter might have stranger anxiety because people other than your immediate family don't know what she is saying.  She knows this, so chooses to clam up.

 

My youngest daughter, now 5, has been in speech therapy for just over a year.  At 3 years old, the only people that could understand her were those in our immediate family--I understood her about 80% of the time, dd1 a little more, my husband barely (because he worked 70 hours a week and wasn't around enough to understand "Avery speak", as we called it).  She had huge stranger anxiety--she flat out wouldn't respond to or acknowledge people she didn't know, and if someone spoke to her, she would defer to me rather than answer them.  She would hold back on speaking to people outside our family that we were around ALL the time--like moms in our homeschool group, or even her grandparents.  When she was speaking in a social setting, we always had to translate for her.  On the few occasions she would feel comfortable enough to communicate with someone else on her own, she would become so.frustrated.

 

A conversation with some moms whose kids had sensory issues got me thinking.  We took her for hearing tests, and her hearing was fine.  So we got her into a speech eval and as it turned out she had an auditory processing disorder (this was confirmed with an OT) and an articulation/phonological disorder.  The audiologist, her pediatrician, her sensory OT, and speech pathologist, all believe at some point in her baby/early toddlerhood, when kids are picking up on on speech and learning how to communicate, she was missing something.  This may be because we did a ton of side-lying nursing and her ears were blocked with milk.  Or because (as we found out later) she under-registers pain and if she did have painfully blocked ears or an ear infection, we didn't know it, and that would have affected her hearing during a crucial developmental time. 

 

She goes to ST twice a week, and loves it.  She asks every day if today is a "Lynn Day" (her therapist's same is Lynn).  She is not parked in a chair and drilled for an hour each time, it is all play based.  Playdoh, board games, hide and seek games, a trampoline, squishy sensory toys, story telling, you name it, they do it, and it is something she looks forward to every week.  She has finally opened up to people, and talks all the time, and she was tickled when people could finally understand her.  I can tell you right now that as a homeschooling mom I believe most of the time that I can do All The Things to help my child, but this is one area where I appreciated the skill and techniques of a professional.

 

Yes, I believe kids should be able to develop at their own pace, and I don't like labels either, but a speech issue is something that needs to be recognized and worked on with a person specially trained in it or the speech patterns and articulation issues they have are even harder to break as they get older.  There is a window for this.

 

I think you have some preconceived notions of how things work, and the only person that will suffer from your stubborn refusal to recognize the obvious is your kid.  Getting pissed off because people on this board are not echoing what you think and want to hear is NOT going to help your child.

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#43 of 50 Old 05-14-2012, 10:43 AM
 
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I just want to second what Boudicca said. No one is going to drill your child for an hour. That wouldn't work. As I said in my post before, play is what happens. And I watch my daughter's speech therapist give her choices whenever possible. As in, do you want to keep playing with the puzzle, or are we all done? Do you want to play with play-doh? Of course giving the child an opportunity to voice her choices also gives her an opportunity to speak. So if you are very concerned with inhibiting her 'free spirit', you can talk with any speech therapist that comes about the methods they use, but I never saw any spirit hampering going on smile.gif. Also, it might enhance your child's free spirit if she also had freedom of verbal expression.

 

Delays in speech are often just a bump in the road, and there is so much help out there for kids who need a little guidance.

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#44 of 50 Old 05-14-2012, 12:38 PM
 
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I know you're tired of the see a specialist talk but I will say DS1 has an articulation issue. A great vocab, talks constantly but up until very recently most people couldn't understand a lot of what he said. It didn't seem to frustrate him and we tried to encourage proper speech but he either balked or got really silly. We got him evaluated and into speech therapy shortly after he turned 4. He LOVES it, it's pretty much just playing games, coloring and talking with the SLP and he responds much better to what she is saying then he ever did to us. So sometimes a third party can be helpful not for a label or diagnosis but just an outside perspective that kids respond to so I'd be very hesitant to just dismiss it.


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#45 of 50 Old 05-14-2012, 04:11 PM
 
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I do not want to sit down and drill her an hour a day, she's not that type of kid. She is a free spirit and I want to keep her such. What I am looking for is small things I can do throughout normal activities that are different from what I am doing now.

 

Her last hearing test was between one and two, like I said it's not a hearing problem. Where my frustration is coming from is the fact I tried to be very up front in my question that she has neither motor skill, hearing or any other indicators of a developmental problem, she just doesn't want to talk and instead of getting answers to my questions I am getting a lot of answers that do not pertain to our particular problem. I know that is hard over the internet sometimes, but I have done my best to be as clear as possible and people are looking over that just to post what they want. I do not want someone that potentially has good information for us to over look this thread because it appears to have been well answered already because it hasn't.

 

WTH we are using the word label because this is the internet! It's easy! diagnosis has more letters in it! I've toted my kids to speciailists, We've been to neuphrologists, we've been to cardiologists, we've been to gastrologists. I was seriously considering getting my oldest to a therapist when she was going through a very angry spurt, but she was growing out of it by the time I found one that I felt was good enough to go to so I decided to wait it out. I am not afraid of getting things done that are necessary! This is one of those times like a couple other mothers have said, I can tell she is just being herself and making a choice and I expect she will start making leaps and bounds over the next year, just like she has made progress over the last few months. What I do not want is someone to diagnose her with some far reaching disorder that they are misinterpretting because she does not like strange adults and she certainly would not like strange adults in our house. Let me make this more clear than before. We just moved we had workers coming and going for weeks she did not want to be anywhere near them. There were a couple of them that we knew from my sister. We visited with them and I tried to get her friendly with them, they were here two days, she didn't want anything to do with them! And one of them has kids the same ages as mine, it's not like they were big scary people that didn't know how to talk to children. She made me hold her the entire time we were near any of them and wouldn't say a word. The gymnastics teacher is friendly and wonderful with kids, used to run her own daycare, it still took months for her to decide she liked her.

 

 

OP... what do you want?  If you think she is just fine and she doesn't need anything what do you want?  You've back tracked numerous times and nobody here wants to insult anyone.  Well maybe some do.  Quite honestly I don't mind doing it everyone once in awhile.  You brought an issue to the table and expected only to hear what you wanted to hear.  When you said you liked what some people said, their suggestions mirrored that of what would or could be done with a speech therapist. 

 

So again please remember it's Better Speech and Hearing month.  But I think it might have some government funding so we should shun it... right?

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#46 of 50 Old 05-14-2012, 04:58 PM
 
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I'm confused, too. Why post on a message board with concerns if you don't want anyone with dissenting opinions from yours to reply? Isn't that part of a discussion (on a parenting forum, at that)? You obviously do have doubts about normal speech development from your OP, and numerous people are saying, hey, when in doubt, why not get a screening done to at least ease your mind? All it can do is help; it's not going to hurt. And speech therapy for kids is generally a FUN thing! They like that attention.

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#47 of 50 Old 05-14-2012, 06:56 PM
 
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Even ABA therapy for Autism isn't "sit and drill" for a kid that age (heck, for any age that I have seen) if the SLP is anything other than totally backwards.  We had some ABA based therapy, and it was still very play based and fun for my kid.  There are still some old-school stagnant people out there, but most SLPs aren't going to that.  Now that my son is 10yo there is some desk work, but it is still done in a way that engages him and is completely age appropriate.

 

It is play based to the point that BOTH of my kids would cry if it wasn't an ST or OT day because they both loved it so much, even the kid that HATED going outside the house wanted to go to those appointments.  It doesn't take away their free spirit, it expands it so they can bring other people into their world easier.  It helps them blossom so they can be who they want to be instead of frustrated and giving up on what they want because they aren't able to tell you what they want.


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#48 of 50 Old 05-20-2012, 03:15 AM
 
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I stumbled across this site while looking for information about mulitvitamins for toddlers.

 

Anyway, as a practicing Speech and Language Therapist, I urge the original poster to get her child evaluated. This is not to say she is disabled / disordered in anyway at all, but by the sounds of it there is a substantial delay. This delay will almost certainly affect later literacy and grammar (at the least). She has already missed a number of sensitive periods regarding her speech and the sooner she catches up, the better and easier her life in kindergarten/ pre primary / year 1 and beyond will be.

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#49 of 50 Old 05-20-2012, 07:21 AM
 
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I Just want to let you know I am in the same boat. I'm a SAHM and my son's never been in daycare or with a baby sitter. My son will be 3 in July. At age 1 my son could clearly say chicken, diaper, balloon. It was ridiculous. now is in speech therapy and has been for months. It's basically done nothing and has been a complete waste of time. WE are still going. The lady is very nice. He was evaluated several times and was behind by 8 months in speech but was at a 4 yr old's intelligence level. 3 months later he was evaluated again and was behind 3 months  (they did nothing but evaluate) So everything that changed, changed because of us. 30 mins for an evaluation could not have helped.  After the evaluation 1 and 3 months later evaluation 2 they said he could continue once a month for an hour to see them. She basically has us play with him and  bribe him to say words. She blows bubbled for him as a reward when he does. Funny thing is..  for others he will say the word you ask.

He's STUBBORN. He is lazy when it comes to speech but you could ask him to do 5-6 things in a row " this then that then that etc) and he'd do them one by one. He's extremly smart as I am going to say your little one probably is too. When they delay on one usually they jump way ahead in the other.

 

I dont want to turn you away from speech therapy but Personally.. from experience.. we think it's a huge waste of time, and if we don't see more improvement by the next appt we will be dropping the therapy all together. You can Look up online what they do and impliment it yourself. I dont tihnk them sitting there watching us play and interact with him is the way speech therapy should work? Personally I find it rather annoying.

 

He's been tested and has NO issues. None at all. Just speech delay.

He is starting pre-school to see if that will help with speech (not for childcare) this Fall.  I didn't start him in daycare etc because I tihnk it's a glorified babysitter.

 

I'd have been concerned if he was Unable to talk period but he says quite a few words and his gibberish is also crazy amounts of "sentences". We do get them and family who stayed here for a few days caught on extremly fast.

Instead of "I see a blue car" My son wants to say " I see a blue car that's driving down the street with 2 people in it". I know it sounds funny but even the therapist agreed. He wants to move to grade 6 before he started grade primary.

 

It'll come.. I wouldnt be concerned. I'm not.

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#50 of 50 Old 05-20-2012, 03:59 PM
 
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Tibris:

 

I'm dealing with a speech delay too.  DS at 28 mos is basically non-verbal, but on rare occasions will say "mama" or "daddy".  He produces a number of sounds, babbles a bit, and uses stress and intonation and can imitate the rhythms of speech pretty accurately, but once produces a couple of real words.  A "normal" kid this age would be chatting away.  DS does not have a cognitive/developmental delay, and his receptive vocabulary and ability to follow verbal instructions is amazing.  He will probably be reading long before he's talking.  I have quite a bit of experience working with kids with learning disabilities and autism, so I've been working with him using some of the same moves I use on my students.

 

Things that seem to help:  These are the things I've done to encourage speech, vocabulary, literacy/numeracy with my own child and students.

 

1.  pictures!  picture cards are great.  You can either buy existing ones or make your own.  I like to cut out pictures from magazines and ad sheets and make my own.  There's also some nice sets on the internet (PECs) that you can download and print.  http://www.do2learn.com/ is a good starter set.  Put the words on there as well so you can develop sight words.  Discrete Trial has some good routines for encouraging speech but you would only have access to that if you had a boatload of money or were working with a speech path.

 

2.  Abstract flashcards (flashcards with numbers and alphabet letters, geometric shapes).  Just because they can't talk doesn't mean they can't read.

 

3.  Sign Language/ASL.  Some kids go for this, some don't.  Mine just recently got interested (around 27 months), so if your child has not been interested in the past, reintroduce the idea every once in awhile.  There's a variety of books/videos out there.  Some people swear by Signing Time. 

 

4.  Picture books.  Works great with things like Usborne, DK books, etc (encyclopedic picture books).  These are things you can get in the library in the children's section.  You can point at the pictures and name all the objects.  As a quiz, you can say the name of the object and have your child point at it.

 

5.  Magazines.  Some magazine have wonderful pictures that make good conversation prompts.

 

6.  I-Spy:  I play I-Spy with my son, and he likes the books (put out by Scholastic)

 

7.  Wrong word games.  I've seen speech paths do this with kids, where you use the wrong word deliberately, or do a task with the steps in the wrong order and see if you can get the kid to verbally correct you. 

 

8.  Songs / Music.  I find most of the songs/videos for toddlers inane beyond belief, and generally can't deal with syrupy music and happy little voices, but there are a few good ones out there.  I particularly like They Might Be Giants (ABCs 123s) and KidsTV123.com (on Youtube). Another decent source for this sort of thing is Starfall.
 

9.  Other kids.  We live in a real isolated rural area where there are few people, and most of the population is 55+, so there are very few opportunities for us to interact with other children.  I notice though when we do go to some community event where there's other children running around and talking, DS undergoes a bit of an explosion of effort in the talking arena.  Maybe seeing other kids doing it successfully helps, I dunno.

 

I'm kind of ambivalent about the whole talking thing, to be honest.  I will readily admit I'm an introvert and not much of a talker myself, although I make an effort to talk to DS.  I go back and forth between worrying, and not worrying about it.  I am taking advantage of Early Intervention, and someone comes to our house once or twice a month, but I haven't seen much of a difference come of that.  I think a lot of it has to do with a child's personality (DS is the cautious observer, and isn't much of an initiator), and we have a family history on both sides of late talkers, so I feel fairly confident that no matter what he'll probably turn out fine.  And if not, in the scheme of things, there's far worse things that can happen to me as a parent than having a child with speech delays.     

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