Waking 10-20x per night at 22 months - Mothering Forums
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#1 of 12 Old 05-31-2013, 03:29 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Super sleep deprived over here!!! DS3 is STILL waking 10-20 times per night.  We co-sleep and nurse.  It's not just waking and nursing.  It's walking and usually wimpering or crying or screaming and trying to crawl away suddenly until he's cajoled into me again and nursed.  I get no sleep.  I've been waiting months and months for this to end, but it's stronger than ever. 

With my first 2 kids, I had milkies go "night-night" when the sun went down by this age.  I'm not sure I could do that with him though, because they were only nursing once or twice a night by this age, and not complaining.  I'm worried that something is really bothering him.  He also isn't a good food eater.  He's not picky, but he spits virtually everything out.  I'm not sure if this is related to his waking.  His lack of other sources of food does make me reluctant to night wean him, though.  I would greatly appreciate any advice you smart mamas may have.  Thank you in advance.


Mama of 10yo dd, 7 yo ds, and 22 month old ds. No VAX, Anti-Circ, Lactivist, EC, UCB x 2. 

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#2 of 12 Old 05-31-2013, 03:37 PM
 
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Editing this because I just now read the subject line! 22 months! will respond more in a minute.

OK.

I wonder if he might have some kind of food sensitivity, because that might explain him spitting out food, and discomfort at night that could cause frequent waking. Some kids that age will wake up at night, but that often does sound like something is bothering him. Or maybe reflux? A trip to the pediatrician might not be a bad idea on one hand, but of course it's likely the pediatrician will tell you to wean/CIO, so that's something to think about.

I nightweaned one of mine at 24 months and it was really easy - so easy I could have done it at 22 months I think - but with the frequency and sounds of discomfort/unhappiness, I wonder if there's another problem to be solved first.

I hope some other parents will chime in with some thoughts. I hope you find a solution and get some rest!
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#3 of 12 Old 05-31-2013, 03:38 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank you for your prompt response!  No, he's 22 months now.  I apologize - I have not updated my signature in a long time.  I agree that 10 months is entirely too early to night wean.  I'm at a loss of what to do with this 22-month old, though.  Would love to hear your thoughts.


Mama of 10yo dd, 7 yo ds, and 22 month old ds. No VAX, Anti-Circ, Lactivist, EC, UCB x 2. 

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#4 of 12 Old 05-31-2013, 03:59 PM
 
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When I night weaned mine at 18 months and the other 2.5 they immediately started sleeping better. I think having to digest all night long was waking them, then they ate again and again and again. They took like two nights and were done.
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#5 of 12 Old 05-31-2013, 04:58 PM
 
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I agree that 10+ times is excessive and would thoroughly investigate sensitivities. Does he swallow anything at all? Like one or two things he will eat while spitting out everything else or simply not swallowing any food at all? Does he drink anything? If he won't swallow anything then maybe there's a physical problem, like an issue with his throat/mouth or something. Maybe its a sensory thing, like being bothered by textures that keeps him from eating. At 22 months old he may still get most of his nutrition from nursing without problems but should be slowly transitioning. I would look into physical/sensory/sensitivity to see if the eating could be improved because I think it's possible that he needs more food to feel full but is having trouble ingesting it.
I don't have experience with these issues but they occurred to me as possible causes for not eating which I think definitely could impact sleep. I hope you get some answers soon!
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#6 of 12 Old 05-31-2013, 05:41 PM - Thread Starter
 
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These answers have been really helpful.  I was wondering about food sensitivities, too.  He does swallow some oatmeal and some yogurt on occasion, but that is barely a few bites every few days.  Sometimes I can get him to swallow scrambled eggs, too.  He seems to enjoy the taste of food, and when he does he ends up shoveling it in and then it all gets chewed ans spit out.  I guess it's time to discuss this with his pediatrician.  I was reluctant to go that route because although he's great for no-vax, he did mention at the last appointment that "there's no nutritive purpose to breastmilk after one year".  DS is small (less than 5th percentile), but so was my 2nd child.  He is otherwise healthy and normal.  He doesn't usually drink anything either though.  uuuggghhh I just hate going to doctors and getting tests, etc.  Seen my DS2 have to go through unnecessary procedures when he was hospitalized with RSV and it brings back such bad memories.


Mama of 10yo dd, 7 yo ds, and 22 month old ds. No VAX, Anti-Circ, Lactivist, EC, UCB x 2. 

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#7 of 12 Old 05-31-2013, 05:47 PM
 
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It does dound like getting an opinion on that is a good idea.
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#8 of 12 Old 05-31-2013, 07:03 PM
 
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I can certainly understand the reluctance to expose him to unnecessary tests and procedures but if there IS something unusual going on then not investigating could have more far reaching consequences. Say if he has a texture problem then it would be easier to overcome at the age of 2 than say at the age of 4. Asking for advice does not mean you're obligated to approve every single test/procedure. You can always ask for a second opinion and/or start with the easiest/least invasive things to rule out certain issues.
FWIW we're still working on eliminating the "shove a ton in, chew, spit out" thing with my 26 month old. It's definitely a table manners/impatience thing with her though. If I force her to slow down then she eats the same food beautifully and all around she's a good/adventurous eater. You could try only letting him have a bite or two until he swallows to see if that would help him pace himself better and have a more palatable eating experience.
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#9 of 12 Old 05-31-2013, 07:56 PM
 
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Definitely talk to the pediatrician - not swallowing a food that he's clearly enjoying the taste of sounds like cause for intervention, or at least a deeper look.  My SIL is an occupational therapist and works on feeding issues with kids all the time.  I would simultaneously be looking into possible food allergies/sensitivities as well.  If you're up to it, you might do an elimination diet for a month taking out the likeliest culprits - wheat/gluten, soy, corn, dairy, and eggs.  There are lots and lots of resources for paleo meal plans that would be in line with an elimination diet.

 

Best of luck!

 

ETA - I forgot to mention that both of you should do the elimination diet, since he's still nursing so much.




Living and loving in ATX with DH (of 7 years) and DS (3.5)
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#10 of 12 Old 06-01-2013, 12:19 PM
 
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Oh boy! Sounds like a painful situation!

 

You are the best judge of your child, and I am no expert. BUT. It sounds like you would benefit from sleep training--putting him in his own room. I loved co-sleeping, but it kept us all awake and no one was getting the rest they needed, especially not baby! It was difficult for us, but we are all glad we did it b/c now we can wake up well rested, with enough energy to give our demanding toddler the love and attention she needs during the day.

 

I have no idea what to say about the foo--is texture a problem? Have you tried all different kinds of textures and temperatures and sizes with the same results? Toddlers go through so many food stages. Mine is 22 months today, and enjoys:

 

-shredded bits of meat she can pick up with her fingers

 

-ripe peaches, no peel

 

-soft cakes (easy to make this super healthy, packed with pureed veggies or fruits or nuts)

 

-yoghurt!

 

Does yours like ice cream, or pudding, or similar treats? Maybe those are good segways to entice him toward solids. I eat my food in front of my daughter (the veggies and healthy stuff), and show her I enjoy it. She usually wants to try a bite, even if she ends up spitting it out in 2 seconds.

 

I hope some of this helps. Sometimes we have to do whats hard to get good results for everyone. At the time it was very very difficult to both wean my daughter from breast milk, and then soon after, put her to sleep in her own bed at nights, but like I said, we all benefited, and we show her lots of love and attention during the day.

 

Good luck!

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#11 of 12 Old 06-01-2013, 07:20 PM
 
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The lack of swallowing is setting off some alarm bells for me and I think I would definitely get him looked at by a doctor. 

 

The first possibilities that come to mind are: food intolerance, reflux (painful swallowing is a symptom, as is lots of night waking), some sort of muscular oral-motor issue, or maybe some kind of sensory issue.  I'm sure that's not a comprehensive list, but our DS had severe reflux and an intolerance to dairy and he had a very LONG, slow process transitioning to solids.  That your DS is eating so little would worry me at that point, especially if he seems to want to eat/likes food. 

 

To be honest it does sound to me like there might be something genuinely bothering him at night - if its not related to food/eating issues, it could also be some kind of sleep disorder.

 

In the mean time I would cut out the major allergens from your diet and see if that helps.  It can be a lot of work, but it might give you an answer.  I swear I spent months eating sweet potatoes, chicken, and spinach. 

 

While I don't agree at all with the previous poster about sleep training (this is an AP friendly site which generally frowns on sleep training), especially if there is a possible medical problem (because leaving a child with a potential medical problem alone at night is about the worst thing you could do) but I DO agree with transitional foods.  We gave our DS way too many bowls of coconut milk ice cream as we were trying to move him to solids.  He needed something easy and very motivating to eat more :)

 

Hope something resolves soon!  As the mother of a 4.4 year old that STILL doesn't sleep very well I totally hear you on sleep deprivation.  Nothing is worse.  Wishing you a peaceful night!

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#12 of 12 Old 08-14-2013, 08:54 PM
 
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Did you find anything out in regards to the swallowing? My 17mo does the same thing with food. He's an avid nurser, has never taken a bottle (still doesn't have any interest in a sippy), has had allergy issues, and still only has 6 teeth. Because of those things, and because he's growing and hitting milestones, I haven't been too concerned. I'd love some reassurance, though! He started to eat a little more a month ago, but has recently gone back to tasting/chewing/spitting out. Wondering if your little one outgrew this issue over the summer or if there was something up with the not swallowing thing.
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Breastfeeding , Nightwaking , Toddlers , Toddler , Nightweaning , Nighttime Parenting How To Get Your Baby And Child To Sleep , Nursies When The Sun Shines Nightweaning Childrens Book , Sleep

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