"Fitting In" With No Television - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 25 Old 03-19-2014, 12:46 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I had a conversation with a speech therapist the other day about child development, and we ended up on the topic of television.  I told her that my son watches very little television, and it is usually only when he is at his grandparents' house with his cousins, and one of the older kids puts in a movie.  The last time I tried to take him out of the room while the rest of them had their juices and snacks on the couch, it was a disaster, and I ended up letting him watch part of Mickey Mouse Club-House.  I'm not sure how to remedy this, because he wants to be with all the kids, so I've let him watch a few shows here and there.  How do non-television watchers handle family gatherings?  

 

My conversation with the speech therapist ended with her agreeing that it's great that my son watches hardly any television.  But then she implied that "for his age group" this is fine, but that when he gets older, he will eventually be watching some shows so that he "knows what all the other kids are talking about."  I had to think about what she said, because I do not want my kid feeling like the odd-ball out when the other little guys are talking about Nemo or Barney, or whatever other character they reference.  Then I even started wondering if it is so bad for a little kid to talk about these characters, anyway.  Is it really harmful?  I doubt it squelches any of their brain power to have a knowledge of them, but at the same time, I really doubt I'll feel compelled to introduce them, or to seek them out.

 

Ironically, at the library today, another parent was doing a puzzle with her toddler and my son joined in.  It happened to be Barney on the puzzle, along with another yellow dinosaur-looking thing.  She asked my son who it was, and he had no idea.  Then she asked me if I knew the yellow dinosaur's name, and I said that I had no idea, either.  

 

In my ideal world, my son will be surrounded with other Waldorf-inspired families, exploring outside, and playing with only wood, wool, and play-silks, but this just isn't realistic.  And the more that I think about it, the more I realize that I want him to have a balanced childhood, and one where he learns that we are all different, and that different families have different lifestyles.  

 

So how do you ensure that your kid feels "like the other kids," without being exposed to commercialized characters, or to other entities that you choose not to incorporate into your lifestyle?

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#2 of 25 Old 03-19-2014, 08:43 PM
 
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They do just fine. Ds (almost 7) has never watched tv in any quantity, perhaps 2 hours a year. When we see family they play. He is in first grade now and picks up a bit from books or comic books (Ninjago / superheroes) and just saw a movie for the first this year. We choose to take him to the Lego movie (too intense, left). It hasn't been an issue at all for him. (heh and he can also draw for six hours straight and just finished reading the first Harry Potter novel).

Ds (closer to 5) seems to know a lot about Frozen from preschool but generally it isn't a big deal. We go to a Reggio school with a character-free policy and it is really the one new friend who watches a lot of tv apparently and brings up the issue.

We aren't Waldorf but are natural toy orientated, have no character toys/books/crap.
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#3 of 25 Old 03-20-2014, 08:50 AM
 
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I think the question is less whether he'll have trouble fitting in, and more how important "fitting in" is in the long run.

 

Any non-mainstream choice you make has the potential to make your kid feel they don't fit in. If you send a homemade lunch instead of processed food or buying a school lunch, they may feel strange (even moreso if you try to do a special diet). If you allow TV but restrict it to certain shows, they'll feel left out when their classmates are watching anything and everything. If you focus on natural toys and don't get them a cell phone at age 10, or all the latest fashions/fads, they'll feel left out. Etc, etc.

 

I'm speaking from experience of being that kid :) Yes, it was isolating when everyone was talking about some show my parents wouldn't let me watch. That continues as an adult at times. But I never developed much of a TV habit, haven't owned one in 11 years, and haven't found a show worth the effort of following online in 5 years. I resented the lack of processed food in my diet as a kid, but eat even further on the crunchy scale now. With both TV and food, I went through a "rebellious" phase when I was able to make my own decisions, but did eventually drift back towards where I'd started. I don't resent my parents at all for setting a good base, or feel any great desire to change who I am to fit in better now.

 

And yes, I did have friends who, even if they did watch more TV than me (which I don't think was true of all of them), were perfectly willing to do other things too.

 

It's ok to set good habits, even if it's not winning popularity contests.

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#4 of 25 Old 03-20-2014, 11:09 AM
 
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I grew up without television.  I am fine.

 

It was sometimes very isolating.  I did not fit in.  Sometimes that was extremely painful.  It sounds incredibly trivial to adults, but there were times as a kid when I would have given anything, in a painful scary I-want-to-die kind of way, to know what "Full House" was about so I could talk about the same things as everyone else.

 

And that is a ridiculously strong feeling to have about Full House.  Or any 80s era sitcom.

 

Being removed from a room with my cousins and taken to a room where adults were doing adult things would have felt very shaming and isolating - my parents were pretty anti-TV, but they never did that.  Those are your child's family - people who are going to be part of his life forever, with whom he will have important and meaningful relationships.  If you don't want your children watching TV with their cousins at family gatherings, you have to host in your house where there is no TV and you have to make a plan for kid activities that kids of a range of ages can participate in.  I have great memories of evenings spent playing games whose rules I no longer remember with my cousins.  And then going into the house for pie and a look at the Thanksgiving football game.  We were a blissful, filthy child mob.  I would have lost so much if I didn't have that.  In short:

 

Don't cut your kid off from important relationships because a TV is on.

 

I watch TV now, and so do my children.  I like stories, and TV has a lot of them.  My dh and his brother both work in media-related fields.  We can be serious about our TV and treat it like art.  Or we can be silly about our TV and relax and make fun of it.  Or we can go outside and run off our energy and ignore it for weeks at a time.  But then sometimes we go to conventions where people dress up in costumes from TV shows.  My relationship with TV is much more balanced than it was when I was a child, and my children's approach to TV will never be as weird as mine was.

 

The idea of surrounding your children with lovely Waldorf things and lovely Waldorf families who share your values is, you know, great.  It will be great that your child will have a community that minimizes television, since that reflects your personal values. 

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#5 of 25 Old 03-20-2014, 12:14 PM
 
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Don't cut your kid off from important relationships because a TV is on.

 

I agree with this. My parents set the rules at home, but didn't attempt to control outside of that. 


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#6 of 25 Old 03-20-2014, 01:50 PM
 
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My parents were anti-tv, no tv at home, and totally let up on the issue for family gatherings in homes with televisions in them, and playdates with friends and so on.  It worked out to a lot of exceptions, but I still had the experience of feeling like there was a cultural discourse going on around me that I had no way to participate in.  If the "no tv" rule had extended to other people's houses, it could have been fearsomely isolating.  I am not sure I would have gone on a single playdate in elementary school with that rule.

 

Finding a community that shares your values will mean that your child's tv exposure is limited in a painless way.  I would absolutely not sweat the tv at family gatherings.

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#7 of 25 Old 03-20-2014, 06:17 PM
 
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We haven't had a television since well before my daughter was born. She is 10.5 now. It has never been a problem. She and her friends have plenty of things to talk about.
We do have a DVD player and we occasionally watch shows, but it is stuff like Star Trek and Doctor Who. If she talks about any shows it is Doctor Who, which most of her friends have never seen anyway.
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#8 of 25 Old 03-20-2014, 06:34 PM
 
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Tinuviel, I think your post represents a significant way the culture has changed.

 

When I was growing up, there was one way to watch TV - you turned it on and sat in front of it, and you chose between the things that were on while you were sitting there.

 

By the time I graduated from high school, VCRs were changing that.  You could choose what you wanted to watch and when you wanted to watch it, using tapes you recorded yourself or bought/rented/borrowed.  We called that "watching videos" and it required ownership of a television.  Now, "watching videos" is a term we mostly use for to describe watching things on YouTube.

 

Now, there are a lot of ways to watch and a lot of things to watch, to the extent where a lot of people watch things and yet do not consider themselves to be watching TV.  We can say "We don't have a TV" and "We occasionally watch some things that are TV shows" and not see these two statements as contradictory.  In the old understanding, if you watched Star Trek and Doctor Who on a screen in your house that meant you had a TV. 

 

In the new understanding, since you aren't watching those things during a broadcast, and, possibly, the device you watch them on isn't called a television, you don't have a TV. 

 

I "don't have" a TV either.  And we don't have cable - we don't watch anything via television broadcast.  But knowledge of Dr Who, in both current and past regenerations, is quite definitely a source of social capital for my 12-year-old dd, and watching Dr Who is a way she bonds with her grandfather and her uncle.

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#9 of 25 Old 03-20-2014, 09:34 PM
 
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We don't watch standard programming either. Occasionally, we will watch a classic movie or.documentary on my laptop. Several times a week, we spensoa few minutes being inspired by YouTube. Today, my 5 year old was talking about parachuting, and my 3yo about trombones. smile.gif

We have friends with kids the same age who act out everything they see on tv. Ninjas, veggie takes, whatever. And they see a lot of it. My kids are being historical characters, and experimenting with reality. Tonight, ds, 6yo, showed me his watch alarm was set to 18:36, since thats the year the Alamo happened.

It's ok with me that they are missing out on pop culture. They know what is real, and rich, and full, not entertaining and numbing. Now and then, I show them a little something to fill the gaps, or explain the plot of a running show so they aren't totally socially out of it.
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#10 of 25 Old 03-21-2014, 05:52 AM
 
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We have friends with kids the same age who act out everything they see on tv. Ninjas, veggie takes, whatever. And they see a lot of it. My kids are being historical characters, and experimenting with reality. Tonight, ds, 6yo, showed me his watch alarm was set to 18:36, since thats the year the Alamo happened.

It's ok with me that they are missing out on pop culture. They know what is real, and rich, and full, not entertaining and numbing. Now and then, I show them a little something to fill the gaps, or explain the plot of a running show so they aren't totally socially out of it.

 

Well, my hackles are up.

 

I am sure you have good intentions and wonderful children - but you seem to be saying that your children's imaginative play is the product of their rich inner lives (which you have enabled), while other children's imaginative play is the result of their mindless absorption of media (with is implied to be set up by poor parenting).  It's all imaginative play, and it all fulfills the same function in children's lives.  Your children are projecting their hopes, dreams and feelings using, I don't know, Johnny Appleseed and King Arthur.  That's pretty exciting.  Other kids are using Ninja Turtles to do the same thing.  This doesn't charm you as much as what your kids are doing, but to a lot of kids, Ninja Turtles is a story about being extremely physically capable, and sharing your life with really good friends.  That is also exciting.

 

In all kinds of story telling, high art = pop culture + time.  Dickens' novels were originally published serially, in cheap newspapers.  Jane Austen included passionate defenses of the novel as an art form in her work, and those are quoted reverently now, but they were shocking ideas at the time, when novels were widely considered to be trash.  There's a really strong connection between plot elements in Shakespeare, and new special effects at the Globe Theater.  I can't tell what things that are pop culture now will eventually be considered high art.  I have some opinions about it, but it's not up to me.

 

I know what is rich and real and full to me.  I choke up when Black Widow confesses that she has red in her ledger, but plenty of people think ScarJo is wooden and that scene is ridiculous.  I find a lot of literary novels unspeakably boring, but plenty of people get more out of them then I do. 

 

I know that "entertaining" is not meaningfully related to "numbing," and that "numbing" is not reliably delivered by the things we watch on the big screen in the living room. 

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#11 of 25 Old 03-21-2014, 07:13 AM
 
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Sorry to offend, MeepyCat. That wasnt the intent of my post.

I didn't intend to imply that the other kids werent imagining, but, rather that I value that my children are continually living in the real world as opposed to fake characters. I was thinkingnof a friends son who had an awkward shift from all the movies.he saw as a little guy to reality. And, all the nightmares he had.

My way of doing things and what I value doesn't mean that yours aren't valid. I thought my perspective might be helpful to the OP.
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#12 of 25 Old 03-21-2014, 09:28 AM
 
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Are you limiting TV because you want to limit access to fantasy?  Will you be screening their reading for that as well? 

 

How are you deciding which characters are fake and which characters are real? 

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#13 of 25 Old 03-21-2014, 10:19 AM
 
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Not neccessarily all fantasy, but selective, yes. And, yes, reading choices are somewhat limited, but not completely. My kids have read many fairy tales and myths, for example. Also hero tales and tale tales. They have read some of the things other kids are reading, like Geranimo Stilten and Flat Stanley. For a time, ds had a thing for banana minions.

And, again, I did mention that I expose them.to pop culture without immersing them. It's the immersion into fantasy and alternate realities, as opposed to the exposure, that concerns me.

As far as what is art and what is not, just because something is classic doesn't mean we embrace it , and just because something is New doesn't mean it is rejected.
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#14 of 25 Old 03-21-2014, 05:11 PM
 
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I've been reading along and enjoying this thread. I didn't comment originally because we aren't tv-media-programming-free, not by a mile. But, we have been "TV-Free" for over 10 years. But in this crazy computer world that phrase is meaningless in terms of media culture exposure, isn't it?  

 

My DH is quite proud of himself for having arranged for our kids to view TV/Movies without any commercials - ever (at least in our home). Our kids also don't really guide their programming because DH gets stuff for them to watch. It's often stuff that is much less common in their social circles. My toddler watches TV but has no idea who any of the main cross-marketed characters are. I don't think she even knows who Elmo is. 

 

I'm sharing to say that I don't think not being exposed to main characters is a big deal at all - it hasn't been for either of my kids (12 & 3).  I know that some of our members felt really isolated by not knowing what The Cosby Show is all about, for example, but I think that the world is so different now. The magnitude of shows that are available to kids...it's crazy!  Even kids with totally free access to media don't know what everything is....because there's SO MUCH. I feel like I watch a lot of TV (and lots of English TV because that's what my DH likes) and I've never even seen Dr. Who. And don't even get me started on the percentage of American TV that I don't know about. I feel like I'm in a cultural bubble...and, yet, I watch TV.  There is just SO MUCH.

 

My older DC watches some nice kids history shows and documentaries that she enjoys sharing with friends. And her friends share shows with her. At 12 I don't feel it advisable to prevent that exchange of interests. 

 

I'll share that I wish I was comfortable limiting my pre-teen's exposure to music. I don't. But, if I could go back in time and remove any knowledge of Taylor Swift, I'd probably do that. :mischief 


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#15 of 25 Old 03-22-2014, 07:42 AM
 
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We are not a tv-free family, but we limit screen time. I just want to comment on the statement that kids can't partifipate in pop culture if they don't see specificshows. Ds went through a "llightning McQueen" phase when he was in preschool and we indulged. He had lightning McQueen toys, clothes, thermos, even a bedsheet set. But when we took him to the movie, we had to get out of the movie theater after 10 min; he said the movie was too scary.
The same thing happened with Spiderman. He wanted everything Spiderman for a while. He has never seen the movie.

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#16 of 25 Old 03-22-2014, 08:40 AM
 
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I grew up without a TV. Sometimes I didn't know what people were talking about, but I don't think my social difficulties were due to that, but rather to other factors. I don't think it would be hard to teach a kid how to navigate those conversations. As an adult I still don't watch much TV and sometimes hang around people who are talking about TV or music I haven't encountered, but that's not the entire conversation and I don't feel left out just because I can't discuss some topics. 

 

I agree with the others who are saying not to get upset about TV on a play date or with family members. It would be different if your kids were, say, being watched every day by their aunt and uncle, and watching TV with their cousins. But I don't see anything wrong with it as part of a family gathering, even if it's as frequently as once a week or so--it's still a special occasion and something done with family. 

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#17 of 25 Old 03-23-2014, 08:22 AM
 
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Our kids don't watch TV, ads and cruelty. They have TV, but only useful content is available for viewing. They watch good and interesting cartoons. About another characters they learn from their peers and they try too fantasize more. :twothumbs

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#18 of 25 Old 03-30-2014, 03:35 AM
 
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I'm bemused.  Be patient with me, am quite new to this parenting approach.

 

Personally, my husband and I don't watch much tv at all - on the odd occassion - if there was a significant event - we might turn on the news a couple of times a year, or watch election coverage - or a specific program.... probably less than 2 to 5 hours a year.

 

Have looked at the research around the negative impact of TV, and it all seems pretty flaky, with a lot of it focused on lost opportunities to do something different - and sound awfully like arguments that could (and probably were) levelled at books - eg. strain on the eyes, anti-social/solitary, limiting active play etc.

 

My daughter (2 1/2 years) quite enjoys tv - she likes cartoon films (Frozen, disney pirate fairies etc)...  I'm a stay at home mum with no family support except husband who works long hours - so basically I am probably looking after her on my own for about 70 hours a week.  We do baking, going to the park, meeting friends, arts and crafts, paining and drawing, nature walks, making a seasonal table and so on and so on... but quite frankly I am delighted that she will watch tv for a bit, because it gives me a bit of space.   Being at home all day with a toddler every day is just hard work.

 

I don't' understand the problem with characters at all...  I really have no clue why my daughter wanting to pretend to be Princess Anna (a princess from the Disney film Frozen) is so terrible.  Other times she will pretend to be Little Red Riding Hood?  What's the difference - or is that terrible too?  Or are traditional chacaters OK? Or are Hansel and Gretel ok, but not The Room on the Broom or the Gruffalo?

 

On a personal level, I've always found not watching TV or being interested in pop culture not a huge problem...   people will talk about soaps or whatever, but they will (unfortuantely) usually explain the characters/storyline if they want to talk about it to you.   Can imagine that non-telly and telly-watching children would do the same.

 

Sorry if asking such basic questions is irritating for regular posters!

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#19 of 25 Old 03-30-2014, 05:01 AM
 
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I don't' understand the problem with characters at all...  I really have no clue why my daughter wanting to pretend to be Princess Anna (a princess from the Disney film Frozen) is so terrible.  Other times she will pretend to be Little Red Riding Hood?  What's the difference - or is that terrible too?  Or are traditional chacaters OK? Or are Hansel and Gretel ok, but not The Room on the Broom or the Gruffalo?

 

 

Not the OP, and we do watch TV, but I can answer a bit on the character thing.  One thing to take into consideration is that I think a large number of our members are from the US. To me, this is very much a cultural consideration because, if you are in the States, we have taken cross-marketing to the most ridiculous degree. Snack foods, clothing, and books are cross-marketed with the popular TV and movies. In the States the attachment to characters can have the potential to sort of warp choices about which foods to eat and which books to choose in the library. And also just dominate the cultural language in a way that a lot of parents feel is unfortunate. 

 

Also, in the US I believe our major pediatric medical establishment has recommended that children not have any screen time before they are two. I think this is not so much because 10-20 minutes of screen time/day is such a bad thing but because they look at the numbers of how much TV older children and adults watch in the US. The statistics are pretty amazing (it's hours/day). And they think that parents of infants/toddlers are not going to moderate so well given the amount of TV older children and adults are watching.  

 

So, sometimes I think an American's reaction to TV needs to be viewed in a larger social context. For the most part, if you see an American venting about TV, they are most likely not overly concerned with the type of TV use you are experiencing in your home, even if they prefer a TV-free home. They (we) are thinking of it more as a reaction against children watching hours and hours of TV/day and the cross-marketing that has gotten so out of hand. 

 

Hope that helps and welcome to Mothering!! 

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#20 of 25 Old 03-30-2014, 08:06 AM
 
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Not the OP, and we do watch TV, but I can answer a bit on the character thing.  One thing to take into consideration is that I think a large number of our members are from the US. To me, this is very much a cultural consideration because, if you are in the States, we have taken cross-marketing to the most ridiculous degree. Snack foods, clothing, and books are cross-marketed with the popular TV and movies. In the States the attachment to characters can have the potential to sort of warp choices about which foods to eat and which books to choose in the library. And also just dominate the cultural language in a way that a lot of parents feel is unfortunate. 

 

Also, in the US I believe our major pediatric medical establishment has recommended that children not have any screen time before they are two. I think this is not so much because 10-20 minutes of screen time/day is such a bad thing but because they look at the numbers of how much TV older children and adults watch in the US. The statistics are pretty amazing (it's hours/day). And they think that parents of infants/toddlers are not going to moderate so well given the amount of TV older children and adults are watching.  

 

So, sometimes I think an American's reaction to TV needs to be viewed in a larger social context. For the most part, if you see an American venting about TV, they are most likely not overly concerned with the type of TV use you are experiencing in your home, even if they prefer a TV-free home. They (we) are thinking of it more as a reaction against children watching hours and hours of TV/day and the cross-marketing that has gotten so out of hand. 

 

Hope that helps and welcome to Mothering!! 

 

OK that's interesting, and thanks for the welcome.  I think we probably could gather a pile of branded items if I went through the house, but there is far more unbranded stuff and in all honesty I don't think DD is especially interested in the branded items.  I think children are very suggestable at this age, but I suppose I do my best to keep things rounded, and introduce her to a wide variety of stuff.  I like the films - I think Disney make great entertaining movies, but aren't exactly a world-leader in books, and I certainly wouldn't consider buying a disney juice carton or a yoghurt.... because when I buy a yoghurt I'm interested in its qualitiy and taste - not the package iyswim.

 

We took DD to Disneyland Paris last autumn - and she had a good time, but she did loads of other stuff too...   I see the point about a child that is given nothing but telly and a diet of Disney PLC, but I do wonder if people over-egg the pie, because as far as I can see (so far) it's all been harmless good fun.   :)

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#21 of 25 Old 03-30-2014, 08:21 AM
 
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We took DD to Disneyland Paris last autumn - and she had a good time, but she did loads of other stuff too...   I see the point about a child that is given nothing but telly and a diet of Disney PLC, but I do wonder if people over-egg the pie, because as far as I can see (so far) it's all been harmless good fun.   :)

I lived in Europe for 3 years with a toddler - it really is a different situation in terms of exposure to the marketing stuff. 


Mama to DD September 2001 and DD April 2011 *Winner for most typos* eat.gif
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#22 of 25 Old 03-31-2014, 12:53 PM
 
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I have never noticed this to be a problem in the low/no-TV families I have known.  Some of these children are as old as nine now.  They bond over legos, American Girls dolls, various games and other non-TV activities.  If one child is playing with a Thomas train, and another child wants to join in, it takes less than seconds for the first child to explain, "The train is named Thomas," and then they move on.

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#23 of 25 Old 04-06-2014, 12:58 PM
 
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We are not screen free, but we limit it very much.  We don't do Netflix or Youtube or have a TV, so what he watches is limited to the couple of shows that I have downloaded on my phone - Daniel Tiger, Pingu, and Curious George.  He has seen a few movies - Toy Story, Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs...he's 3.25, btw.

 

We have gone long stretches where we've been totally screen-free because DS was WAY addicted and wouldn't want to do anything other than watch.  Once he turned three we found we could let him watch a little bit here and there without it being an issue.  

 

I am always surprised to see how many of DS's peer group, 3-4 year olds, are obsessed with superheroes.  I can't get over the fact that the shows center around both violence and the good guy/bad guy dichotomy.  So far DS is blissfully unaware of good guys and bad guys.  An 8 year old into Batman doesn't faze me, that seems pretty normal for that age, but for a 3 year old it just always surprises me.  

 

On the character thing - my reason for trying to limit them is simply marketing.  I don't want DS being sold things because they have a character he loves on them.  That kind of direct marketing to kids really puts me off.  That's the only reason we don't do Sesame Street, although he has been exposed to it and recognizes most of the characters.  At this point, even though he's into a couple of marketed characters (Curious George, Buzz and Woody), he isn't totally obsessed and doesn't ask to buy everything he sees with their face on it.  Phew.  Hoping it stays that way.  I'm not against indulging an interest, but we tend toward minimalism and I'm not going to buy a cup we don't need because it has someone's face on it.  




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#24 of 25 Old 04-10-2014, 10:55 AM - Thread Starter
 
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This has been a really great discussion.  I've taken the last few days to catch up on the reading!  Thanks for all of the thoughtful responses.  I love this community because I learn from so many people.  

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#25 of 25 Old 04-10-2014, 10:20 PM
 
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:lurk

Great discussion! This is a well-rounded sample of perspectives.

 

My two cents:

I think about this issue a lot because if it were up to only me, I probably would not have a TV at all. Dh, on the other hand, does not have a problem with selected shows from Netflix. And, admittedly, it is nice to have a show as an option when I need a break (unfortunately, I sometimes feel bad about it, like I am doing something wrong... why?).

 

Its true about the studies; the final word is pretty common sense: too much TV without other types of interactions can be problematic. And, if a child only watches TV, they may be predisposed to only watching TV as an adult. I haven't found any hard data that suggests TV ruins children's imagination, though I have heard a few arguments about it (usually something about TV being non-interactive, whereas books are, but I'm not sure it holds water). That said, I really have no appreciation for the prescriptive gender roles and predictable story lines of most mainstream shows (not to mention the obvious didactic messages that strike me as contrived). And I loath target marketing (And who said you had to buy a product for your kid because it has a character that they like on it?). Unfortunately, these problems are bigger than TV. I have come to accept the fact that my dd will understand these problems as she matures because both dh and I are vocal about such issues. Luckily shows aren't her only road to value acquisition.

 

While dd is young, I will be a bit selective about what she watches. Even though I personally came around from cartoons and MTV to a more critical standpoint concerning culture and identity, I still battle some deep seeded notions. Did I get them from TV? Not necessarily. But they were readily reinforced through the media.

 

Ultimately, I can't find an argument convincing enough to get dh to chuck the TV. Now dd asks for shows because she knows they are available. Nevertheless, my dd is social, imaginative, self-directed, and adores all animals. She loves to do the dishes, play by herself, play with friends, go to the park, dig for worms in the compost bin, paint, and cook. Her favorite thing to do is explore outside. She also likes to watch some shows. I personally do not like a lot of screen time, but more and more that seems to me to be just a preference, especially since we do so many other great things with dd. I think if a child's environment is full of various stimuli and opportunities, he or she will flourish.

 

Oh, and I do not think that limiting a child's exposure to pop culture will have a lasting ill effect. As ocelotmom pointed out, any non-mainstream decision you make will have repercussions for you and your family in the big wide world. In the end, you have to make the decision that resonates the best with you. peace.gif 


Its my super DH superhero.gif, my lovely DD jog.gif(11/15/11), ferocious Future Cat, and myself read.gif

 

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