do you let your toddler watch television? - Page 3 - Mothering Forums

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Old 04-15-2005, 05:05 AM
 
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The OP asked people their toddler's TV habits and the decisions behind them. All posters are doing is answering this question. Sometimes a poster is asked to clarify or elaborate. And ridiculing people's opinions is not the purpose. There are many threads to debate TV. Sorry, Wholewheat for threadjacking.


Tanibani, great post.

I live in Manhattan now, and we love nothing more than to explore the riches of the city. I take my son all over to see it all. And he has a great time. The city is an amazing playground and classroom.


Wholewheat: Music is very important to us. My son's father is a musician, and my son is as well. We play a lot of music on our intruments as well as listen to CDs. My son could recognize the Beatles by ear out and about. When PLing at 25 months, my son asked for dancing and music as a reward (rather than sweets, stickers, a toy, etc). And every day we do a lot of dancing, movement and singing--part of our routine.

I chose to eliminate the little TV we watched because I do not think there are any benefits. TV is just not important to me. Nothing I have seen or read makes me think it is critical to my son's childhood.

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Old 04-15-2005, 08:46 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Kristine
These threads always start out fine and then get to the point where logic takes a backseat. The posts about the link the TV and obesity, etc. are hilarious beyond belief.
Excuse me? The research is out there on this, it's not like I made it up. There is a direct correlation between time spent viewing TV and the likelihood/degree that a person is overweight/obese--as you seem to be agreeing even within your post. It's not as though I said that watching 5 seconds of TV makes 100 pounds of fat suddenly appear on your body. I was very careful to explain that this is one among several reasons for my family and to not be rude about it.

Quote:
Question for all you notvmoms.
you dont even let your little1s watch movies like alice in wonderland or aladin or anything?
It's not a matter of "let" or "forbid", as so many seem to think...we just don't have those kinds of materials in the house. This question always kind of baffles me. I mean do you "forbid" your young child to, say, drive your car?

FWIW, I could see taking DS to see a movie in a theater as a special treat when he is quite a bit older. I just don't see any need to have videos at home.
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Old 04-15-2005, 09:58 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Wholewheat Buns
question for all you notvmoms.
you dont even let your little1s watch movies like alice in wonderland or aladin or anything?
Occasionally, DH will go to Blockbuster and get something "kid-friendly" on DVD and we'll all gather around the computer and watch it. This is very rare -- a treat -- once every month or two maybe. We don't buy the movie and let him watch it over and over again on demand. We do own "Finding Nemo," but it is my emergency movie for those one or two times a year when I'm so sick I can't lift my head to care for DS properly.

what is the the biggest concern for you about television and children?
the main reason you choose no tv?

As I explained in a previous post on this thread, the passivity the TV seems to create (both physically and mentally) is the greatest concern for me. It's quite possible TV doesn't hurt the majority of children. The evidence is mixed. But there's no evidence to say that it helps, beyond the anecdotal "my child learned his numbers off Sesame Street at 18 months." That's great, but that supposedly incredible feat can be easily duplicated through parental teaching, books and educational toys and games -- all of which have a long, long history of being positive things. I want my kid exposed to all the best things in life. TV is mediocrity in a box.

what about music?
We have no problem with music. Music is art. Music is wonderful. MTV and music are not the same thing. We have a very large collection of music -- "tunes" my DS calls them. He dances and grooves to them. We also listen to the radio when we are in the car.
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Old 04-15-2005, 10:25 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Kristine
I understand that this is a hot button topic, but when children are denied things all it means is they'll be even more curious to try it when they're older and then they'll have no guidance and truly be at the mercy of advertisers. There is this thing called moderation, yet I wonder if people have problems with this in their life.
I'm an adult example of someone who grew up without a TV in the home. My father was an education professor who believed that children who don't have a TV in the home achieve a higher reading level at a faster rate than TV-watching children. I was his "experiment."

I'll admit I did go through a period of time in my late teens when my college roommate's TV was a draw for me, but by that time I was old enough to analyze and change my own behavior and I soon realized that TV was really quite shallow. Sometimes I would laugh at the commercials -- ladies prancing around selling shampoo with their shiny hair blowing in the breeze. How silly! This sort of thing actually persuades people to buy things? :LOL I was at no one's "mercy," needed no "guidance." I was not an innocent babe in the woods, but it seemed to me like the rest of the world might have turned into one while I was busy reading books.
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Old 04-15-2005, 10:51 AM
 
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Kristine let me try to explain myself a little better


There is a difference when a child is naturally ready to learn to read/count then them learning it from a TV.
"Clearly, there is more to reading than meets the eye! Besides the superficial process of decoding words on a page, there is a corresponding inner activity that must be cultivated for true reading to occur.Its called "living into the story/reading comprehension." When a child is living into a story, she forms imaginative inner pictures in response to the words. Having the ability to form mental images, to understand, gives meaning to the process of reading. Without this ability, a child may well be able to decode the words on a page, but he will remain functionally illiterate. "

Of course I dont wanna start an off topic thread on this however i was trying to get my point across by all means i was nt impliing there is an EXACT Age it more has to do with the individual child 'natural' readiness and curiousity from the world around him/her.


As for the tv aspect I would be more happy to exclaim that my DC learned these type of things from Real World situations, his parents and so on not from watching Dora, Blues things of that Nature

Once again everyone does as they wish and we are all writing our opinions however some do show research. I havent seen an research FOR TV however ( someone did ask a few)?


EX: Child at DC ( 17 months) storytime loves watching some tv show ( not sure of the name) and boy do you hear about it from the mom. For example He comes to ST rambling off numbers and such however of course NO comprehnesion whats so ever of it. While he was so called 'mezmorized by the TV i guess he 'memorized'


Over course everything in moderation however we cant watch tv in moderation if we dont have one or most importantly the TIME!


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Old 04-15-2005, 10:51 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Kristine
I understand that this is a hot button topic, but when children are denied things all it means is they'll be even more curious to try it when they're older and then they'll have no guidance and truly be at the mercy of advertisers. There is this thing called moderation, yet I wonder if people have problems with this in their life.
Would you say this to a vegetarian mama who did not feed her child meat? That she is unwisely setting up her child to have a craving for meat when he is older?

Different families have different values. I don't know why that is so offensive to you.
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Old 04-15-2005, 10:58 AM
 
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NO WAY! We have no TV, have not had since I left my parents house, where the frequent buzz drove me insane and sucked me in sometimes to waste hours... There is nothing on TV that could possibly surpass spending time outdoors, doing creative things, playing music, dancing, work around the house, or being with one another. What I also found is without TV my child has always been able to entertain herself just fine even during those stressful times when everyone says it's helpful - after breakfast, before dinner, before bed. Of course there were some struggles when she was a toddler, but I never would have replaced one set of problems with the other set caused by the TV.

Yes, much of the research is biased. And much of it is also indisputable. The research doesn't sway me as much as my own childrens' reactions and those of other children I see around me, to wit,

Dd is 5 now and I still see the same response in her whenever she watches, which she does sparingly [like a carefully selected, original DVD with us twice a month, (rarely disney or "franchised" stuff), a tv show maybe twice a month at someone's house] - she imitates the play for days or weeks, suppressing her own creative voice inside, she pines for things resembling those the actors have or wants to be like them, have their clothing, etc, and in general gets confused about why life isn't like it is in TV Land. (Especially when someone is severely hurt or dies and then comes back.) Most of all, she gets totally hyperactive and jumpy and violent, right after, no matter if it's a nature program or a cartoon. This is without commercials. It makes me feel very uncomfortable.

Frankly, I don't care if TV teaches things. Those things can be learned by LIVING. Please don't take this as judgment of parents or parenting styles if yours includes TV. I don't sit around spouting this POV to everyone (unless they ask!) But the truth is, I am frightened on a more global scale for the future of a TV-possessed culture.

I think I have such a strong feeling about this because I am American and have lived and traveled extensively in other cultures. This whole TV issue, to me, begs a deeper question. From a cultural perspective I have watched the US get sucked deeper and deeper into a vortex of out-of-control, unethical marketing and consumerism aimed at tiny people, idolatry, greed, significant "dumbing down" and loss of creative spark in children and young adults, obesity, depression, more environmental illnesses than you can shake a stick at, a truly disturbing jump in violence, and "social life" has become watching TV or movies together! Remember pajama parties? [My pre-teen niece has "movie parties" because she & her friends don't know what to do together if it doesn't involve a telephone, computer or TV - and she was raised with "moderate" exposure.] I think TV is a major culprit in this.

The concept of "moderation" is somewhat spurious to me. Just because something exists, does it mean we should even accept it into our life-view as a potential actor? Just because coca cola exists, should I let my toddler drink it even sometimes when I know it has no nutritional value? Because fast food places exist, should I consider them part f the restaurant choices I have when it has been proven how unhealthy they are? I know I can get a handgun, should that be part of my range of things to even consider buying? IIt's not against the law to spank my kids, so should it be part of my cache of ideas for how to raise them? I hope this makes sense. I'm certainly not judging anyone, but I am just horrified at what I have seen on a grand scale when I've been in countries where TV does not have the enormous role that it does in the US.

I won't even go into my feelings about its use as a political propaganda tool (and a tool to help divert public attention from things that govt doesn't want you to know) because I've already written too much.

Now, I will seek shelter under my desk.
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Old 04-15-2005, 11:01 AM
 
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I'm certainly not judging anyone, but I am just horrified at what I have seen on a grand scale when I've been in countries where TV does not have the enormous role that it does in the US.
What i mean is i am horrified by the US in comparison to these other places which do not have the same rates of violence & other social problems, etc.) !
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Old 04-15-2005, 11:04 AM
 
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There is nothing on TV that could possibly surpass spending time outdoors, doing creative things, playing music, dancing, work around the house, or being with one another


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Old 04-15-2005, 12:07 PM
 
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Yes, I do allow my kids to watch TV. My almost 3 year old quite enjoys it but my 15 month old isn't interested yet. We have a channel where I live called Treehouse that is all pre-school shows. Similiar to PBS but runs 24-7. She watches a bit in the morning and late afternoon. She is also a big Disney fan and watches Disney DVD's. We don't watch "adult" TV with them - she wouldn't let us anyway. If the TV is on she wants to watch her shows!

I too think that in moderation TV is fine. My 3 year old has an excellent imaginiation and I think TV has helped, not hinderd that. She is constantly role playing her favorite Disney princess or whomever. I couldn't imagine her life without TV - she gets very excited about certain characters and loves to interact with them. I don't see a problem with that at all. The channel she watches doesn't have commericals but I am not sure if I would have a problem if they did. Commercialism is part of our society - she will be exposed to it her whole life whether she watches TV or not.

Yes she read books too, but isn't as interested in them as she is in the TV. Quite frankly, either am I and I don't have a problem with that.

Oops, I forgot to add that just because a child watches TV, does not mean they don't play outside, do crafts, read, etc. It's ok for kids to sit and relax and have a bit of "downtime" too.
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Old 04-15-2005, 12:08 PM
 
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Originally Posted by wednesday
Would you say this to a vegetarian mama who did not feed her child meat? That she is unwisely setting up her child to have a craving for meat when he is older?

Different families have different values. I don't know why that is so offensive to you.
Well said!

Homesteading Mama to homeschoolin' kiddos London (10) ; Alexander (8) :; Holden (5) :; and Sergei born at home 8/18/08
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Old 04-15-2005, 01:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Kristine
What study could link TV alone to obesity?? It simply couldn't! It's what you do or don't do whether in front of the TV or not that is the problem. Sitting in front of the TV eating potato chips and drinking pop will reap different results than a child eating a healthy meal and spending hours outdoors before watching TV, or after for that matter.

I understand that this is a hot button topic, but when children are denied things all it means is they'll be even more curious to try it when they're older and then they'll have no guidance and truly be at the mercy of advertisers. There is this thing called moderation, yet I wonder if people have problems with this in their life.
Kristine is right. TV alone does not cause obesity. Eating too much of the wrong foods and not getting enough exercise causes obesity. I believe that there is nothing wrong with a little tv in one's life as long as it is balanced with arts and crafts, music, literature, nature, good food, exercise, exploration, etc. Moderation is the key. Blaming all the ills of the world on tv is missing the boat.

Let's stop picking on each other for having different points of view in this thread and just concentrate on answering the op's original question. Leave the politics for another forum.
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Old 04-15-2005, 01:58 PM
 
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Imitation is different from pure imagination


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Old 04-15-2005, 03:32 PM
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Originally Posted by asherah
If Thomas is used to sell vaccinations.. well, then I will have issues.
:LOL

I agree that some characters promote commercialization/profits. But Thomas doesn't bother me that way. For one thing, he started out as an actual character in a book. And the trains are sooooo much fun for my son to play with. The videos are in real time and very pleasant. I've always been kind of an anglophile anyway...

I think we all just have to pick and choose what feels right for us. Some of us are more moderate about things than others. I don't think no tv vs. some tv makes for a good or bad mother. I think that a child who sat around all day eating chips and getting no attention or exercise, as one PP mentioned, would definitely not be receiving good parenting. But I don't think anyone here is doing that!

My personal philosophy is not to rely on expert opinion totally to make my judgements...and there was some debate over that tv study that questioned whether ADD was more common in kids who watched tv b/c the parents needed to plunk them down and get a break. Chicken vs. egg thing. In other words, was it just an assocation rather than a proven outcome.

Anyway, I feel comfortable with my own decisions regarding this (limited tv exposure, etc.) and I think everyone else is justified in drawing their own conclusions and making their own decisions. The OP wanted feedback from all of us, but that doesn't mean we have to attack each other...
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Old 04-15-2005, 03:36 PM
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Michele
I agree with this. TV is never as important or satisfying as real life, and interacting with TV characters is not a substitute for interacting with real people.

I still feel there is no harm in moderation. It really depends on each child and family. Some kids are perhaps more influenced by having the t.v. on than others. My son, being very active and curious, really doesn't want to sit still that long. He would much rather go chase our poor cat or run and play outside. His wagon, which he can fill with rocks or other treasures, holds far more interest than the tv.

If someone else sees that tv. is causing their child to be more passive, or aggressive, or whatever, why then of course one could see why they were so anti-tv. If you think it is doing something bad to your child, then you have to do what you think is best. But that doesn't mean it is affecting everyone else's children the same way.

Incidentally, I watched a fair amount of tv as a child, learned to read before kindergarten, and was always at the top of my class in reading and language arts.

BUT that is probably because I had parents who also read to me A LOT, and valued books and education, and provided a balance of activities for me and my siblings....
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Old 04-15-2005, 04:21 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ArlyShellandKai
Imitation is different from pure imagination
That's certainly true, but I would have to offer my experience, as someone who grew up with a lot of TV. I did do a lot of imaginative play around TV shows, but they were just a jumping off point. I played a lot of Dukes of Hazzard, He-Man, and Batman inspired scenarios. I was definitely not just replaying the shows, though. I did the same thing with books. I would create scenarios that used the characters, but they ended up acting in very different ways from the shows/books. And the aspects of the shows/books that resonated with me were generally not the ones that were emphasized on TV or in print. I tended to go for the "what they're doing when they're at home, not out having adventures" aspects. If they had made episodes based on my play, I'm sure the shows would have been cancelled. I just don't think that watching people wash dishes and shop for food is what the target demographic was looking for. :LOL

I'm not sure why I liked using the already created characters. They didn't really bear much resemblance to the originals when I was done with them, but somehow it was what I liked. I also enjoyed the shows, but they never quite measured up to my play.

Just another point of view. I'm definitely not suggesting anyone should have their child watch TV for this reason, just pointing out that you can have true imaginative play based on a TV show. (And, BTW, I didn't *only* play these games. I did a lot of play not based on TV, too. I was a very imaginative kid.)

One more thought: I didn't have a lot of kids in my neighborhood to play with, so I was often playing by myself. Maybe groups of kids are more likely to play something that's more in line with the TV show, since each of them might have particular aspects that they want to be true to, and when you add all those aspects together, it could equal the entire show. Since I was playing alone, I could change or keep whatever I wanted. (I still would have preferred more neighborhood friends, though! )

Lisa , mom to Isaac (9/1/03), Violet (6/19/06), Simon (10/9/09); wife to Eric ; handservant to Grace :
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Old 04-15-2005, 04:48 PM
 
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We let our dd watch tv. I limit it to PBS and a few shows from Nick Jr. She gets one show a day, most days. Usually while I'm in the shower (last time I didn't put a show on, she locked herself in the other bathroom!) DD and I have also recently started making fridays movie day. We get a kids video from the library and watch it Friday afternoon as a treat for us both.

That said, I have abused TV with dd at times. There was a period a few weeks ago where dd and I were both eating too much junk and watching too much TV (hours a day). Dd became a very irritable dissagreeable child, and I was very depressed feeling. I then took us both off sugar and TV for a week. We're all doing much better now. And even though I've returned to the above TV schedule, its not an issue.

I think this is something that everyone has to figure out what they are comfortable with. I don't think TV is evil, but I also can respect that some people don't want one.

Laura, Mama to Mya 7/02, Ian 6/07 and Anna 8/09
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Old 04-15-2005, 04:56 PM
 
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Mason can watch a bit of Jo Jo's Circus or the Wiggles in the morning while we get ready for the day. He will passively absorb what's on for about 5-10 minutes and then get up and leave the room.

I've Tivod a few older SS episodes for emergency use as well as a few Wiggles episodes. I do not like new SS and I am DYING for some of the really old, like 25 YO episodes to be available on DVD.

I also saved a few Mr Rogers episodes. He is my FAVORITE and if Mason wanted to, I would let him watch him for HOURS.

The TV is not on at daycare so I don't have to worry about him rotting his brain there.

My youngest sister was basically raised by the TV and movies. She has rotted her mind. She had an imagination as a child that was strictly based on characters she watched on TV and from movies. To this day, she cannot survive without her TV. Its sad. I do not want my son to grow up that way.

We do believe in moderation. We have family movie nights on the Fridays we have dh's kids. We do moderate what the older kids watch (their mom does not...) We all go outside whenever possible. TV doesn't rule our lives. Dh has a TV issue since he's the type that NEEDS to relax by it every night. I don't. And so far, neither does our ds. We'd rather play first than watch TV. That said, we play in the family room which has a TV... So yes ds is absorbing whatever crap dh has on...

Thankfully my rule still stands NO TVS IN THE BEDROOMS.

Rhianna momma to ds #1 - 9 & ds #2 - born 10/22/2012

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Old 04-15-2005, 06:07 PM
 
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Originally Posted by wednesday
Would you say this to a vegetarian mama who did not feed her child meat? That she is unwisely setting up her child to have a craving for meat when he is older?
Speaking as a vegetarian mother, that logic is a bit flawed. The reason why I say this is because while we don't feed our child meat, we also don't pretend it doesn't exist. As time progresses, our son will learn where meat comes from, how it is raised in factory-farmed conditions, what is put into the meat, and everything it takes to bring the meat to market. When he is older and is aware of these facts, he may then decide on his own if he wants to partake of it. If he does, that is fine. I will have done my part in teaching him to be aware of his surroundings and to have tools to make decisions. That is my job as his mother.

My point about the television was simply this: most of the posts I see or an either/or type. TV is simply a tool to be used. Demonizing it or excluding it from your home is as irrational as banning hammers because the hammers could potentially be used to break something instead of its appropriate use.
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Old 04-15-2005, 06:15 PM
 
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Originally Posted by kathipaul
Kristine is right. TV alone does not cause obesity. Eating too much of the wrong foods and not getting enough exercise causes obesity. I believe that there is nothing wrong with a little tv in one's life as long as it is balanced with arts and crafts, music, literature, nature, good food, exercise, exploration, etc. Moderation is the key. Blaming all the ills of the world on tv is missing the boat.

Let's stop picking on each other for having different points of view in this thread and just concentrate on answering the op's original question. Leave the politics for another forum.
I agree. I'm sorry if I offended anybody and I agree with this post that moderation to all things in life is the key and that is the point I was trying to make.
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Old 04-15-2005, 06:17 PM
 
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No TV here - thanks to The Plug-In Drug.

This includes videos, too, which fall under the same category as "TV" bc they involve staring at the screen. Also no computer time.
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Old 04-15-2005, 07:03 PM
 
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we don't watch much TV - about 2 shows a week. But DD watches them with us if she's up. We don't make a big deal about it. Neither one of us are into childrens videos so we don't watch much children's TV. We watch The Amazing Race and Lost. The occasional Law and Order.

Even though we both work full-time we don't watch it in the morning or evening when making dinner. I find it's much more fun for DD to be right there with me - helping to make the meal, or sitting on my dresser getting into all of my make-up and earrings. Or standing next to the ironing board hissing back at the iron. DH will take her in the shower or take her downstairs and get her breakfast and she helps pack her lunch. She starts the dishwasher, too. When we watch TV it's usually something we do together. Once when we were both sick we popped in the Spiderman movie we had just bought. "I 'piderman!" she kept saying.

To get back to the OP - I'd feel wrong if I plugged her in to the TV so I could get something done. But not because it was TV, but because as a CC mother, I aim to do things WITH my child, not FOR my child. I have an expectation that my DD will help out with the household things - like making dinner and getting herself dressed. She's 2 now and it definitely makes it harder for us in the morning and evening, but you'd be surprised what you can do with a kid. And since I'm away from her all day, I want to spend as much time at home WITH her, not doing things around the house. Since the household stuff still needs doing, she's with us.

PS. My 2 yo has never actually asked for the TV to be turned on. Maybe we watch boring shows to her. But when the shows go to commercial she does ask for the chacters to come back. DH and I are usually discussing some aspect of the show during the commercials. We're a FAMILY of talkers LOL!

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Old 04-15-2005, 07:46 PM
 
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I would like to clarify what I meant about "moderation". I too strive for moderation in most areas of my life (except chocolate!). But none can deny that TV is omnipresent in US culture - the centripetal force is such that you CANNOT escape its influence to one degree or another. To me, having to buy my kid socks with Dora on them and underwear with Power Puff Girls on it because I can't find any in the shop that are unadorned (yes this has happened to me), well, that is enough TV already in our lives!

Or for instance when we were living in the States 2 years ago, dd wanted to be a mermaid for Halloween. We set about making a gorgeous outfit. One day she comes home saying "I want to be The Little Mermaid" which she saw on several backpacks around town & her cousin told her about the movie. Suddenly my original colorful creation for my dd, which she had conceptualized, was no longer a "proper" mermaid for her because she was so influenced by the sheer quantity and marketability of this other mermaid image that was everywhere. Someone gave her the image and it blocked out her own original concept. So for me, again, that's enough TV. We don't even have to see the movie for the characters to invade our lives! Simply stepping into the culture guarantees being exposed to TV. So only going that far is my way of manifesting TV moderation for my family.

I think it's okay once in a while to borrow a character, but the child's imagination is so rich (as one PP said) that in my mind there is just no need - why bother with extra stimulation by the TV, when kids come up with their own fantastic ideas from life?

I also watched a modicum of TV growing up, but in those days it wasn't what it is now, with dozens of channels with all-day programming geared toward marketing to little children from birth. Here in Czechy there is one kids' TV show per day. It runs from 7:00-7:10pm, yes, TEN minutes! The story is creative and unique, not syndicated characters but new ones for each week, and after that the host comes on and tells all the children goodnight. They might have another show on Sunday morning and a special once a week. This represents to me a reasonable "moderation" in TV for children. They are well thought out, age-appropriate and have no commercialism attached to them. We still don't have a TV, but dd watches the evening show when she sleeps at her grandma's.

I certainly didn't mean any offense with my post, I just have a real concern about TV's cultural impact, and it's not a judgment of other mamas but a worry about our children. Obviously, I believe late exposure is far preferable to starting kids early on TV.

Choosing not to have a TV in our family's life feels neither extremist nor irrational, just as we are effortlessly vegetarian or I don't own any high heels. Just the way things work for us.

I also am enjoying reading this debate, I didn't catch any overt nastiness or anything and the OP did ask for reasons why, so she's getting plenty pro and con and in between!

Peace all.
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Old 04-15-2005, 09:00 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kristine
Speaking as a vegetarian mother, that logic is a bit flawed. The reason why I say this is because while we don't feed our child meat, we also don't pretend it doesn't exist.
I don't recall anyone saying that they completely hide the existance of TV from their children. If a TV was blaring in a public place like an airport or doctor's office, I wouldn't cover my DS's eyes or walk out of the room with him. That's just silly. A couple minutes of TV-watching while we wait isn't going to warp my child for life. But that doesn't mean I need to allow one into my home, or that I am any less firm in my belief that it is the modern opiate of the masses.

There's a lot of things parents choose not to allow into their homes because they think the negatives outweigh the positives. I grew up in an alcohol-free home, for example, but no one tried to deny it existed and I didn't turn out to be a drunk just because I hadn't been hardened to it at a tender age. Toy guns are another issue that comes up here at MDC a lot. Many parents simply refuse to allow them in their homes, and I don't see how not having a TV in the home is any different of a choice than that.
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Old 04-16-2005, 12:37 PM
 
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My DS watches some t.v. He's 20months. He rarely sits and watches. He's always puttering around. We watch NOggin sometimes but mostly he sees videos like Bob the Builder, BAby E., etc. I try to screen shows/videos first. If there's a message or some redeeming value, I'm o.k. with that. We keep our t.v.s out of the main areas of our house. If DS sees a t.v., he'll probably want to watch it so this helps us a lot.
If I'm sick or having a really rough day, we might hand with the t.v. a bit more. And that's far better than me losing it in frustration
When DS is watching, I'm usually e-mailing so it's a nice break for me too.
We don't use t.v. too much, though. It's more a little here and there.
I don't watch much t.v. myself. I'm down to 1 show a week. DH watches a lot of Comedy Central and the History Channel, but he does that on his own out of DS's way.
I'll have to read The Plug in Drug and get rid of t.v. all together, huh?

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Old 04-16-2005, 02:50 PM
 
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This thread finally prompted me to order The Plug-In Drug from Amazon.com. I've wanted to read it for awhile now anyway. While my book-buying budget is used up for the month I was able to buy a used copy of the original version for $.75.

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Old 04-16-2005, 06:56 PM
 
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Sasha our local library has the 2002 vs you may want to check yours too.


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Old 04-17-2005, 12:16 PM
 
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I have two older kids (ages 3 and 5) so when they watch, my 1-year-old watches. But she isn't terribly interested in it either and will only watch for a minute or two and then go off and do something else. I think some TV is OK but it's just so easy to get out of hand with it. I'm glad the weather is warming up so that the kids can spend more time outside instead. It can be hard (at least, it is for me) to be vigilant about turning the TV off.
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Old 04-17-2005, 12:55 PM
 
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OK, I started reading all the responses and realized this is turning into the whole "us verses them" thing. So... I am just posting my answers. My kids don't watch TV or videos with any sort of regularity. We try to do family movie night every few weeks- usually a short kid flick- and the older two have been to the movies once. If we are somewhere with a TV on, we don't rush out, though, unless it is something I feel is inappropriate. No Disney movies here yet (Michael watched The Lion King with me as a treat when he was 5), no trademarked 1/2 hour long commercials (Thomas, Dora, etc), no supposedly educational shows- there is nothing they can learn from television that they cannot learn "better" in real life. As far as TV giving them experiences they can't have in real life- so what- they are 1,3, and 6. They are still trying to figure out the immediate world around them. The whole moderation arguement could be made for anything- you have to let them drink a little booze while they are young, or they will rebel and binge. If I deny them crack, they may go out and seek it when they are older. I know these are ridiculous examples, but, frankly, the argument itself seems a little crazy.
My personal issues with TV are
1. Passivity. With obesity running rampant, the last thing kids need is to be sitting around for more hours every day
2. Lack of imagination. Even if it is "interactive" TV, the child is still playing what the little furry character on TV says to play.
3. Commercialism. If you can buy a toy that goes with the show, it's commercial.
4. Developmentally inappropriate. Children learn by actively exploring their environments.
5. Values. There is very little on TV that reflects the values I want to pass on to my children.
6. Brain waves and TV pictures. I know research can be skewed, but I believe the research that says TV is bad for little ones' brains.
7. Time Waster. There's too much in life for toddler's to do without spending time in front of a TV.
8. Not really relaxing. I want my children to learn relaxation skills that will take them through life, not how to escape into television.
9. Breaks. I just find other ways of getting breaks.

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Old 04-17-2005, 03:24 PM
 
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Annette Thanks for that Post! I don' t think any of us could have said it better!


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