How do explain dreams?!? - Mothering Forums

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Old 01-22-2003, 12:25 AM - Thread Starter
 
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My daughter is two years old (just), and I think she has been having dreams lately. She woke up one time and said, "bucket!" (which means a bowl with food in it). She said it in the tone of voice she uses when what she wants is just out of reach. She doesn't wake up screaming or anything, and she doesn't look particularly scared, but it does look like she is dreaming and I am at a loss as to how to explain dreams to her. Any ideas??

Thanks!

Patti
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Old 01-22-2003, 01:32 AM
 
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My 2.5 year old has a vivid imagination and has been making up wild stories for a long time. So, I taught him about the difference between something real and something which exists in his imagination. It made a really nice transition to the dream thing- we talk about how his imagination keeps working even when his body is asleep. In the morning, we always ask him about his dreams, and he has his standard response, "I dreamed abot kitties, and woofies and bones and balls and water..." Nightmares are new to him, and we're working on explaining the really bad dreams. We've gone with, "Sometimes you have dreams you don't like." He seems to get that, since he sorta understands the concept of a dream.
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Old 01-22-2003, 04:33 AM
 
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DS is not talking yet (nearing 2 1/2) so I cannot hear about dreams from him, but this I have heard with regard to monsters/bad dreams/etc. Rather than teaching that they are not real, I believe it is best to recognize that they are real to your child, and to support them in feeling their strength to battle the monsters, the bad dreams, etc. "You are strong and can stand up to the monster." As far as good/neutral dreams, well they are something you can marvel at and hear from them, more than tell them about. I see it as something to learn from them, how they experience dreams.
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Old 01-22-2003, 03:27 PM
 
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b'h

Quote:
Originally posted by teachma
So, I taught him about the difference between something real and something which exists in his imagination.
how'd you do this? i need to work on this with dd.
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Old 01-26-2003, 05:14 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by chani

quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Originally posted by teachma
So, I taught him about the difference between something real and something which exists in his imagination.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
how'd you do this? i need to work on this with dd.
Over the natural course of growing your child will become aware of the difference. At this point they are both real. I wouldn't advise telling them that something they experience as "real" is not real.
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Old 01-26-2003, 07:55 PM
 
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My son is actually really into the distinction between real and imaginary, or real and pretend, or real and fiction. He'll tell dh, who teases him profusely, "That's fiction, daddy." I always thought it would be a powerful tool for him to be able to recongnize the difference. He plays very creatively, but he does things like, "I am the puppy and you are my owner, but just for pretend, okay mommy?" and then we'll go on to have a grand old time barking and chasing on all 4s in the living room. I don't think the ability to distinguish has harmed his desire to pretend and play, and I also don't think it's taken credibility away for all of the vivid things he imagines; quite the opposite, since he is the kind of kid who really likes categories for everything
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