Do you make "special" dinners for your toddler if they don't like what you are eating - Mothering Forums

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Old 05-24-2006, 10:35 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I ask this question because so far I have been giving Kiera what we eat. If she likes it, great. If not, she just doesn't eat or eats the part of the meal she does enjoy. I know that sometimes she is hungry, however, and don't want to starve her! I don't want to become a short order cook like I see some of my friends doing either. My one friend told me I was "mean" becasue I didn't fix Kiera something else if she didn't like what we were eating...Thoughts?
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Old 05-24-2006, 10:41 PM
 
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To answer the question, nope. The only time he gets something different to eat is if we've tried to feed him earlier, he's still up when we eat our dinner, and he wants some of that.
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Old 05-24-2006, 10:57 PM
 
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I don't usually bother, because ds often doesn't eat much at dinnertime anyway. Only if he hasn't had a good late afternoon snack and I'm making something that dh & I like but he doesn't, I'll give him a bowl of cereal or some leftovers he does like - but only after I put the regular dinner in front of him to see if he's interested. Usually I just try and make sure there's at least one thing he likes for dinner.


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Old 05-24-2006, 11:02 PM
 
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I don't fix dd (15 months) a seperate dinner per-se.... but I do have a little snack plate with some fresh fruit, avocado, crackers with nut butter, etc avaliable if she refuses dinner and she hasn't eat much else throughout the day. On days that she has eaten well in the morning and afternoon, I don't usually offer that if she chooses not to eat dinner, but on days where she has barely eaten a grape all day, I will pull that out if she is boycotting dinner again.

As she gets older I don't think I will make a seperate dinner for her... I will try to have at least one thing at the table that I know she likes, and if she opts not to eat that then I wouldn't fix her anything else until later. I might fix her a sandwich an hour later or something if she was really hungry.

Hope that helps... I realized as I was typing this that I don't really know what I would do! So far she just nibbles on bits and pieces of what we have, and if she doesn't, I just figure she isn't hungry and leave it at that.
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Old 05-24-2006, 11:10 PM
 
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I sometimes do, but ours is kind of a special case, because DD has some oral and feeding issues and she's honestly not physically capable of chewing a lot of the foods that we eat, and at her age she'll refuse purees, understandably so. So I try to have an alternative available when we're having something she can't eat. Otherwise, though, she can choose to eat or not eat whatever we're having.

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Old 05-24-2006, 11:18 PM
 
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my dd (3.5) gets very vocal and whiney when a huge injustice like foods she doesnt love have the nerve to sit on her plate. i offer her an apple or oatmeal (its plain but instant) since they are quick, but thats it....something i can just grab and not 'prepare'. i do believe the whole family eats the dinner, and me and dh eat whatever is cooked whether we prefer it or not. we just eat certain parts and make something else later if we are still hungry, just like dd has that option. i was made to eat whatever was on my plate or wear it (i am not joking, after about an hour or 2 of sitting there looking at a meal, my mother actually would dump it on us or punish us in some similiar way)
so i try real hard to understand and be very positive about trying and eating and being a part of the family.

she is still an individual with her own likes and dislikes, who needs mild and loving guideness with trying new foods or eating foods that are available even if they arent her 'bestest most favorite'....
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Old 05-24-2006, 11:30 PM
 
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Dd is 25 months and is very verbal. She eats what we eat and is great about trying things. However, sometimes she requests something different and really, really seems to want it. If it is not doable (macaroni & meatball) then its not doable. Sometimes if she does not like what we're having even after trying it and wants an egg or cereal or soup, we make it. She is pretty easy though, and I am a horribly picky eater so I am very flexible about food. I grew up with major eating issues and I'm trying to spare her.

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Old 05-24-2006, 11:43 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MelMel
my dd (3.5) gets very vocal and whiney when a huge injustice like foods she doesnt love have the nerve to sit on her plate. i offer her an apple or oatmeal (its plain but instant) since they are quick, but thats it....something i can just grab and not 'prepare'. i do believe the whole family eats the dinner, and me and dh eat whatever is cooked whether we prefer it or not. we just eat certain parts and make something else later if we are still hungry, just like dd has that option. i was made to eat whatever was on my plate or wear it (i am not joking, after about an hour or 2 of sitting there looking at a meal, my mother actually would dump it on us or punish us in some similiar way)
so i try real hard to understand and be very positive about trying and eating and being a part of the family.

she is still an individual with her own likes and dislikes, who needs mild and loving guideness with trying new foods or eating foods that are available even if they arent her 'bestest most favorite'....
Sorry you had to go through that...I wasn't made to waer it but I did spend many a night curled up next to a bowl of split pea soup. My mom would warm it up again in the am and make me eat it for breakfast unless I finished it in the middle of the night. I guess that's why I want to be more flexible with dd...
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Old 05-24-2006, 11:43 PM
 
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DS usually eats what we eat, and there's usually enough different types of food that if he doesn't like part of it, he just doesn't eat it and eats everything else. So, generally, to answer the question, no. Occasionally, I will make seperate meals because we're trying to avoid wheat and there's just something wheat-filled that I'm dying to eat, so I'll make him a special wheat-free dish that's similar but just a few different ingredients.

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Old 05-25-2006, 12:00 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ladybugchild77
I ask this question because so far I have been giving Kiera what we eat. If she likes it, great. If not, she just doesn't eat or eats the part of the meal she does enjoy. I know that sometimes she is hungry, however, and don't want to starve her! I don't want to become a short order cook like I see some of my friends doing either. My one friend told me I was "mean" becasue I didn't fix Kiera something else if she didn't like what we were eating...Thoughts?
With all due respect to anyone who DOES do this, I think it is a dreadful mistake that is setting you and the child up for some absolutely awful behavior. Obviously, not in every single case does this happen, but it's a matter of what you're communicating when you do this. You're sending several messages:

1. You will be catered to.
YIKES. I don't see anything wrong with a reasonable degree of flexibility and respect for a child's tastes, just like I show a reasonable degree of flexibility and respect for my husband's tastes, and he for mine. (That is, sometimes I cook things like potato soup, which I like and he doesn't, and sometimes he grills pork chops, which he likes and I don't, but that's really only once in a while.) BUT being a short-order cook exceeds the limits of what I personally find appropriate or reasonable. It also teaches the child that they never have to just buckle down and deal with it when life presents them something less than ideal. No, I don't believe in shoving a child into the cold, harsh world of reality, but I think that serving a child what the family is eating is hardly punitive.

2. You actively encourage picky food habits
I honestly believe that the short-order cook method absolutely encourages picky eating and very possibly sets the child up in an essentially unhealthy relationship with food. Children, as far as I've seen, rarely choose to obsess on, say, broccoli and lean meat. It's more like chicken nuggets. Even if you throw a vitamin in the mixture, this is absolute cr*p for a child to eat anyway, much less as a regular meal.

4. It also teaches them to treat food and dining disrespectfully, which sounds kind've stupid until you think about the fact that in most of the world, people don't have the luxury to be picky eaters. They'd be lucky to have the luxury to be eaters. Encouraging a child's "icky" factor with food is, for my money anyway, a slap in the face to the people who have no food or not enough.

In short, I think children have a great deal of common sense when they're given the opportunity to exercise it. If you place healthy food in front of a healthy child, sooner or later, they will eat because they're hungry. I don't believe in forcing a child to eat. I prefer if a child tries one bite (and one only) of an unfamiliar food, but if they don't like it after that one bite, then so be it. I've yet to hear of even one child who starved him- or herself under those conditions. Ever. Again, I'm not meaning to tread on the toes of those who do differently, nor meaning to incur the wrath of the GD flamers, but I frankly think you're being a GOOD MOTHER to your child...and your friend needs to look up the meaning of the word "indulgent" in the dictionary.

Oh, edited to add, I'm not including kids with oral or allergy or dietary issues. I'm talking about the run-of-the-mill kid.
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Old 05-25-2006, 12:01 AM
 
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We don't make special meals either. But we try to make real adult meals that he can enjoy.

I have to say that my mom did this for me as a kid and it was a HUGE mistake. She became a slave to my pickiness. She made me a separate dinner every night well into my TEENS!
Don't start a bad habit. I agree with offering snacks and knowing that your DC will eventually eat when really hundry.

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Old 05-25-2006, 12:04 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ladybugchild77
Sorry you had to go through that...I wasn't made to waer it but I did spend many a night curled up next to a bowl of split pea soup. My mom would warm it up again in the am and make me eat it for breakfast unless I finished it in the middle of the night. I guess that's why I want to be more flexible with dd...
Wow, did we have the same mom? I loved pea soup...it was shrimp Creole I ended up seeing again.
and again
and again
and again
until I broke down and ate it.
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Old 05-25-2006, 12:05 AM
 
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Wow, sorry to hear some of your experiences with food as kids My parents were divorced but my dad pulled some of that stuff with me... fortunately I only visited him for a night or two at a time.

Anyhoo, I usually ask DD what she wants for dinner before giving her anything. She's pretty reasonable about food, even at a little over 2. Food is one of the few things she doesn't tantrum about On the rare occasion when she decides she doesn't want whatever it is, she's welcome to have something else that is in the fridge already and easy to heat up or throw together (scrambled eggs, leftovers, etc). I don't know if it's my flexibility that made her so reasonable or her reasonability that made me flexible but it works It helps that she is good about trying new foods and not terribly picky.
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Old 05-25-2006, 12:05 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ladybugchild77
I ask this question because so far I have been giving Kiera what we eat. If she likes it, great. If not, she just doesn't eat or eats the part of the meal she does enjoy. I know that sometimes she is hungry, however, and don't want to starve her! I don't want to become a short order cook like I see some of my friends doing either. My one friend told me I was "mean" becasue I didn't fix Kiera something else if she didn't like what we were eating...Thoughts?
With all due respect to anyone who DOES do this, I think it is a dreadful mistake that is setting you and the child up for some absolutely awful behavior. Obviously, not in every single case does this happen, but it's a matter of what you're communicating when you do this. You're sending several messages:

1. You will be catered to.
YIKES. I don't see anything wrong with a reasonable degree of flexibility and respect for a child's tastes, just like I show a reasonable degree of flexibility and respect for my husband's tastes, and he for mine. (That is, sometimes I cook things like potato soup, which I like and he doesn't, and sometimes he grills pork chops, which he likes and I don't, but that's really only once in a while.) BUT being a short-order cook exceeds the limits of what I personally find appropriate or reasonable. It also teaches the child that they never have to just buckle down and deal with it when life presents them something less than ideal. No, I don't believe in shoving a child into the cold, harsh world of reality, but I think that serving a child what the family is eating is hardly punitive.

2. You actively encourage picky food habits
I honestly believe that the short-order cook method absolutely encourages picky eating and very possibly sets the child up in an essentially unhealthy relationship with food. Children, as far as I've seen, rarely choose to obsess on, say, broccoli and lean meat. It's more like chicken nuggets. Even if you throw a vitamin in the mixture, this is absolute cr*p for a child to eat anyway, much less as a regular meal.

4. It also teaches them to treat food and dining disrespectfully, which sounds kind've stupid until you think about the fact that in most of the world, people don't have the luxury to be picky eaters. They'd be lucky to have the luxury to be eaters. Encouraging a child's "icky" factor with food is, for my money anyway, a slap in the face to the people who have no food or not enough.

In short, I think children have a great deal of common sense when they're given the opportunity to exercise it. If you place healthy food in front of a healthy child, sooner or later, they will eat because they're hungry. I don't believe in forcing a child to eat. I prefer if a child tries one bite (and one only) of an unfamiliar food, but if they don't like it after that one bite, then so be it. I've yet to hear of even one child who starved him- or herself under those conditions. Ever. Again, I'm not meaning to tread on the toes of those who do differently, nor meaning to incur the wrath of the GD flamers, but I frankly think you're being a GOOD MOTHER to your child...and your friend needs to look up the meaning of the word "indulgent" in the dictionary.
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Old 05-25-2006, 12:07 AM
 
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Most of the time, dd eats what we're eating but sometimes we eat things that we know she won't like (very spicy Thai food, for example...although dd has surprised us and liked it). I make meals 3-4 times a week, and the other days are leftover days, so everyone eats something different. There are still some foods we're avoiding too, so I don't see a problem with offering one choice that technically isn't on the menu. It's not like I'm in the kitchen slinging hash in the kitchen or anything...if I offer something else, it's either leftover lunch or a fruit or something. Food battles aren't worth it to me, but maybe I'll feel differently when I have two kids instead of just dd.
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Old 05-25-2006, 03:03 AM
 
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No. My child has severe feeding problems (she's weaning from a stomach tube) and I even expect her to eat whatever I cook for meals. I may puree it and spoon feed it because of her special needs but I don't make separate meals for her. The exception is breakfast because she can't eat very much of the traditional breakfast foods, so I will puree her some fruit and graham crackers. I also let her snack on whatever she wants, because I believe that toddlers should have choices in some areas of their lives. I present a list of several snacks and she can pick the one she wants, be it crackers or fruit or french fries. She gets her nutrition from the meals so I don't care what she snacks on so much-- I just don't give her snacks before the meals so she has room for the good food.

Now my 5yo really enjoys mac and cheese for lunch so that's what I make for her almost every day even if that's not what I eat for lunch. It's easy to make and not a big deal. But for dinner or if we eat at someone else's house for lunch or I pack sandwiches for a picnic, then that's what she eats.

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Old 05-25-2006, 03:23 AM
 
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NOPE! Ds eats what we eat. There have only been a few times that he's gone away from the table without eating much. I always figure that he'll eat when he's hungry and over the span of the week will get what he needs. I try to offer a variety to my family. Sometimes I've found that ds is more open to what we're eating if I break down a more complicated dish into it's pieces. I'm not making a special meal per se, just reserving some parts of the dish on the side.

I had always thought/read that toddlers are more open to dishes if they tastes are pretty simple. However, I have learned with ds that he likes some taste/spice to his meals. It's kind of like he was waiting until I'd ante up on the "real" food and stop feeding him that bland stuff! Go figure!
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Old 05-25-2006, 09:02 AM
 
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Wow. This is a great thread -- it is really helping me think about this issue. I do have one question, though... At what age did you stop making special baby-oriented meals, and transition to eating what the rest of the family is eating? My DD is 18 months, and she eats some of what we're eating, but also has a full array of foods in the fridge that we bring out specially for her (we always have a variety of steamed veggies on hand, plus beans, avocado, hummus, nut butter, and some other stuff). Meanwhile, she is getting very picky the last few weeks, and I feel like I have to go through a dozen foods to find the few she will eat. I am now wondering if I am encouraging this by giving in to her pickiness! But she still seems so little for us to be demanding that she eat grownup food. Is it worth it to insist that she eat something new or go to bed hungry... and have her have a complete meltdown about it?

Related to this... DH and I eat dairy products, but we are delaying dairy with DD. So sometimes I have to make her something different anyway. But I suppose I could still require that she eat what we give her, and not parade a list of foods infront of her.

Also related... I have two stepsons that are extremely picky eaters. It is mac and cheese, pizza, pasta or something like that, or nothing. It is like torture trying to get them to eat something "different" and at best we're talking about one fork full just to "taste" it. They have finally become pretty good at eating certain vegetables -broccoli, carrots or corn only - and only after a lot of work! They do eat a salad before every meal, but even there it is only lettuce, carrots and I sneak on some nuts. They eat absolute crap at their mother's house, and we're vegetarian at our house - so we feel like we're in a tough spot. We don't want them to avoid coming to our house because we "force" them to eat eggplant. I guess my point is... I don't want my daughter to become a picky eater like them.

Anyway, I didn't mean to co-opt this thread. I just find it to be of extreme relevance to me! I look forward to more responses!
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Old 05-25-2006, 09:10 AM
 
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Yeah, that. (but at 5yo some of this is getting better.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Llyra
I sometimes do, but ours is kind of a special case, because DD has some oral and feeding issues .
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Old 05-25-2006, 10:07 AM
 
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I guess pretty similar to others...I try to include at least one thing I know DS likes in our dinners, so that he'll eat something. But if I'm making something that DH and I really like and I know ahead of time DS doesn't (like chili), I'll just toss some hummus, pita, and veggies on a plate for him and he's happy as a clam. We'll still offer him a bit of what we're having and sometimes he'll try it, sometimes he won't. No biggee. There are still some things I don't want to try that I've tried previously and didn't like.

As others have said, he's an individual and free to have likes and dislikes. If he doesn't like the taste of something new we're having, and he's tried it at least, we will go grab something quick like a PBJ or cheese and crackers, but we won't "prepare" a separate, true meal. But, we also don't ask him every meal if he wants something different, since by including at least one thing he likes, I'll be sure he's eating something.

We stopped "baby/pureed" food and started him on variations of whatever we were eating pretty much around 12 months - he eagerly started solids around 5 months and did cereals and purees for a while, then around 8 months started with finger foods, bananas, cheerios, avocado, etc. ...he's always loved "real" food (inherited from both DH and me!), and by just making it safe for him to eat when he was smaller, he was pretty good to go. I think he started eating exactly what we eat (no seasoning variations, etc.) probably around 16-18 months or so.

As a kid, my parents had a "one bite" rule...They wanted me to take one bite of anything new to give it a try, and then if I didn't like it, I didn't have to eat it...my mom pretty much always made sure there was something on the table I did like, too, so I guess that's where I got it from. I thought the "one bite" rule was pretty fair, I never felt put upon or punished by it.

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Old 05-25-2006, 10:21 AM
 
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Giving DS something else to eat is sometimes the best way to get good nutrition into his body. If I set in front of him the exact family meal, he often ends up eating only the starch. I could choose to only eat such foods as would appeal to all members of the household, but I like having hot enchiladas and spaghetti puttanesca and whatever else, and my little ones don't, so we often do eat different things.
I disagree that it teaches terrible life lessons to offer foods that children want to eat. I don't eat food that I hate - I wouldn't fix it if it was gross to me. It's not "life" or "reality" that decides what's for dinner in my house - it's me. I do think it is punitive to deny a child other foods that are readily and easily available to other family members because they failed to eat something you fixed. (Note: don't think the OP is doing this, it doesn't sound like her child is distressed or hungry).
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Old 05-25-2006, 10:37 AM
 
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I may alter the meal slightly, but I never make something different. If it's pasta and they'd prefer not to eat the vegetable sauce, then I'll give them the pasta w/ no sauce and some carrots on the side. But usually they like what we're having because that's all they've ever been offered, so it's not a problem. And an hour and a half after dinner we have a small snack before bedtime, so even if they chose not to eat, they wouldn't starve; but I don't think that's ever happened, LOL.

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Old 05-25-2006, 11:59 AM
 
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I don't cook an entirely different meal, but I give my dd other options if she doesn't like dinner. I always have carrots, yogurt, and various fruits that I am willing to give her. She is slipping below the 5th percentile on her growth chart, so I never pass on a chance to give her something to eat. Even if it means extra work for me.
I was also one of those kids who sat at the table until I finished my dinnner. Most things that I didn't like as a child had tomato in it. When I was in college I found out that I had an allergy to tomatos. My parents feel bad about that to this day.
Quote:
I honestly believe that the short-order cook method absolutely encourages picky eating and very possibly sets the child up in an essentially unhealthy relationship with food.
I don't think this is entirely true. I think kids have various reasons for being picky. I started out giving my dd nothing, but the most nutritious foods ie. avocado, broccoli, asparagus etc. At some point, I think around 15 months she decided that she didn't like any of those foods, and I had to find others for her. I still ask her to try them every once in awhile. I still don't give her junk foods, but she is a picky eater.
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Old 05-25-2006, 12:00 PM
 
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Originally Posted by MelMel
my dd (3.5) gets very vocal and whiney when a huge injustice like foods she doesnt love have the nerve to sit on her plate.

I usually don't make something special but I will set aside a portion of the dinner before adding spices if we are having something too spicy for him (which he's usually good with but I'm talking clean your sinuses out spicy, which dh loves).
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Old 05-25-2006, 12:05 PM
 
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DD usually eats before we do so she usually gets something different. Though she loves our food and really enjoys spicy stuff! When we eat she comes over and "visits" us and she often sneaks a few bites from my plate or I give her a few spoonfuls of any meatless part of our meal. We haven't introduced meat in her diet and don't plan on anytime soon, however we do eat meat ourselves.

At restraints I try to order something she will like for myself and the a side of cooked veggies for her and I share my meal w/ her.
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Old 05-25-2006, 12:05 PM
 
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I make sure everyone is fed and happy. Despite having always fed dd something else if she does not like the main meal, she 95% of the time happily eats the dinner I make. The other 5%, she is welcome to help herself to whatever she wants or she can request something that requires my help. I will not get up in the middle of my meal and cook another 5 course meal, but I have no problem with warming up a leftover from another meal or popping a can of refried beans (dd's favorite). I do not make myself eat things I do not want to. I do not make dh do so either. I do think it is "forcing" to say "eat this or go hungry". I think it sets up bad habits an dis plain mean. I do not think it teaches good nutrition habits.

I know how disheartening it can feel to make something that I think dd loves only to have it rejected. But that is my problem, not hers.
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Old 05-25-2006, 12:55 PM
 
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No I will not. DD had numerous food allergies and did not eat food until she was 2 years old, and then went to eating what I was eating (I was on the same restricted diet she was on for bfing). Today at 3 years old she has no food allergies, although I do tend to limit some high allergens. If dd truly doesn't like whatever I am fixing, which is rare, the child will eat almost anything, then she will eat the other portions of the meal. I was a very picky eater until adulthood and I still have many things I won't eat, I do feel it has limited my eating pleasure. DH also is very picky, but in an oppsoite way of me, it makes planning meals really interesting. My child is entitled to not eat whatever she wants, I don't care what she eats, I don't buy junk food so that's not an issue. But I also don't tell her, that she can eat this meal or I'll fix something else. If she requested something quick like yogurt or leftovers in the fridge, then I would get it for her, but she never has. I guess my philosophy is like LLL's "don't ask, don't refuse", but within reason. I have friends whose dc only will eat Annie's mac and cheese, everytime they come over for dinner I have to make seperate dinners for the children, that's not my life I wouldn't do it for my dc.

There is no way to happiness, happiness is the way.
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Old 05-25-2006, 01:00 PM
 
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absolutely NOT... We have 5 kids and another on the way, LOL i would never leave the kitchen. The only thing I make Different for Dominic (16 months old) is if we are having something involving any egg. He is HIGHLY allergic!! so that has to be modified, but other than that, NOPE, they either eat or they dont. I make a 2 week menu, and I get input from everyone, so we all get things we like. It works out.
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Old 05-25-2006, 01:02 PM
 
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Well, I only make one "dinner." I try to make sure I cook something that I'm pretty sure ds will like. (we eat a LOT of carrots and pasta around here lol).
He snacks a lot during the day, and especially before dinner. While I'm fixing dinner, he'll ask for some fruit or something (I keep canned fruit in his cupboard in the kitchen). So even if he doesn't eat much of his dinner, he's not too hungry.
If he shows interest in eating later, I get him something. Of course, he's not old enough to ask for anything complicated, so its usually some yogurt, or a banana, or something simple like that.

I really dislike the concept of not letting kids have something to eat other than the dinner that was prepared. I don't imagine I'd stop eating to prepare a whole new meal, but I'd have no problem at all getting up to get him something quick. Cereal, fruit, yogurt, maybe even a peanut butter sandwich.

Oh, and sometimes If there isn't much in the meal that I think he'll like, I'll give him some leftovers that he did like, or some other fruit or veggie.

We stopped baby foods at a young age, because ds wouldn't eat anything that was mashed. lol. Probably 10 mos or younger.

eta- I pay very little attention to what ds eats or doesn't eat. If he's out of something that he likes and he wants more, I get it. But I personally don't even pay attention to if he takes one bite or not. (I guess I should say that if he doesn't touch any veggies, I might make an effort to include more veggies for snacks the next day, but that's it). I really trust in his ability to eat healthy foods if I put them in front of him.
My mom did the "just one more bite" thing, and it caused major power struggles. I refused to admit that I could possibly believe that rice was edible until I was 17. So there I was, before that, wanting to try it, but not wanting anyone to say "I told you that it was good!".

Becky, partner to Teague, SAHM to Keagan (7yo), Jonah (2yo)
 

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Old 05-25-2006, 01:03 PM
 
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Noooo way. I'm really lucky to get one dinner made. I *will* make him something special if what we're having is way too spicy (typically because I mess up a recipe & think extra curry will make it taste better... ). Last night we had these grilled sausage thingys that were FIRE hot. They were free so we ate them, but I made DS something different.

Thankfully, he's a machine. He'll eat just about anything, including things that would probably make the average American toddler vomit. He loves spicy foods, but has a pretty low tolerance for heat-spice right now.

But - I hate that reheat/reserve torture thing. If he doesn't want it, it goes to the dog or into the fridge for leftovers. Typically he's not eating because he's not hungry.
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