20 months old and not speaking words - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

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#31 of 50 Old 06-10-2006, 10:30 AM
 
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when I worked in a daycare we had a little guy that had an older sister (much older) and he didnt say much of anything. We talked to his mom about prompting him to speak and giving him responsibility (helping to pick up, throw away his own things, go get his own coat, go get his own shoes) and within a month or two, he was speaking more. His sister was 10 and it seemed to me that they did a lot of things for him rather than allowing him to do things he COULD do for himself. So he just kind of became a bit lazy on the uptake of words and had settled into his role as the baby of the family. He was a very different little boy and we definately had worries that there were other things going on. However, after our meeting with his mother, things just went constantly uphill and he really blossomed... never actually needing intervention. It was very interesting... just thought I would share.....
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#32 of 50 Old 06-10-2006, 10:37 AM
 
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oh!! we used Babysigns.... it was a great book and a little more simple than ASL. I actually did use signs with my kids starting at 6mo and they had both dropped the signs by 14mo and used the words for the signs instead, but its never too late to start! Most common signs for my kids were eat, more, up, fan, cup, kitty........ we only used a few before they started talking. At 18mo it is likely that he will pick up the signs quickly. I used them in the daycare i worked at in the toddler room. The kids had no problem learning the signs.
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#33 of 50 Old 06-10-2006, 12:28 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mamajessica
50 words!!! by 20 months. Wow. My DD is 17 months and has 3 words. I can't really imagine her saying 47 more words in the next 3 months, but maybe.
Same here! 50 words?! Ani can say dada, mama and baby (bee-bee ).
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#34 of 50 Old 06-10-2006, 12:57 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piglet68
Anyways, the appointment is made and we'll go from there. In the meantime I will start with the signing. If anyone has a quick link to a "how to" page, or a book recommendation, I'd appreciate it.
www.signwithme.com
I go to it when I want to look up a new sign for ds.


Quote:
Originally Posted by idocrase
Double yeah that! on not trying to diagnose (or rule out) a hearing problem on your own.
That it interesting to me. I guess those things satisfied me, because I *knew* that there was nothing wrong. So maybe it just does come down to instincts and how you feel.
I wasn't saying to rely on those things, just to see what happened. I wouldn't think that anyone who was thinking about speech eval would NOT go do it just because they whispered and talked without gesturing, and dc responded properly. lol.
Like I said, I wasn't worried, just kinda wondered "what if..." ya know. And knowing that he could do those things helped put my mind at ease even more. But I had never seriously considered speech therapy for more than 2 seconds.

And I don't know if there is anything to this, but EVERYBODY (except my stupid pedi. She wanted speech therapy at 18 mos.- there's a bunch of reasons I don't like her) said that ds was perfectly fine, and they all think that there is absolutely no reason to worry. He'd just talk late. And I don't think it was just to make me feel better. So perhaps there is something to other people's perceptions of our kids. kwim?

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#35 of 50 Old 06-10-2006, 01:23 PM
 
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Piglet, you can have my copy of Sign with Your Baby (and the quick reference card) if you like -- I had a VHS as well, but I'm not sure where it is.. I'll keep looking if you'd like it, we don't even have a VHS player anymore.

http://www.sign2me.com/

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#36 of 50 Old 06-10-2006, 01:32 PM
 
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Hi, I haven't read all the posts yet. But -- to the OP: My DS is 13 months old and hasn't said one word. Two pediatricians showed concern upon learning this information. I had his hearing tested and now he is being referred to a speech therapist. I posted about this problem one month ago in "Life with a Babe" and most people seemed to think it wasn't too big of a problem, but that getting a consult "couldn't hurt." I am doing the therapy eval for peace of mind. My DS had ear infections & ear tubes, so that could play a role, too.

In terms of a hearing test, all they did was put us in a booth and see if he responded to voices within the booth. It was nothing elaborate or fancy, as I expected.

I have heard that boys speak later than girls, but I don't know if that is true or not?
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#37 of 50 Old 06-10-2006, 01:36 PM
 
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Piglet,

I also encourage you to have him evaluated. It is within the norms, but it would not hurt to check if there is a problem with his hearing.

I also know of a boy that needed his tonsils removed at 3 years. He did not speak until they were removed because the size was impairing his speach.

It may be nothing, but why not check?
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#38 of 50 Old 06-10-2006, 02:02 PM
 
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Book recommendation: Sign With Your Baby by Robert Garcia
(I believe his was one of the first books on signing with your baby, and he promotes American Sign Language based signs, with some slight modifications for handshapes that may be difficult to duplicate with little hands.)

Update when you can after the doctor's appointment and any referrals!

~claudia
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#39 of 50 Old 06-10-2006, 02:16 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TurboClaudia
Book recommendation: Sign With Your Baby by Robert Garcia
It's actually Joseph Garcia, and this is the one I have and can give you.

Nicki

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#40 of 50 Old 06-10-2006, 02:39 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks so much, all of you. Sharing your stories and your support is so wonderful. I'm not afraid of the therapy, especially after hearing so many positive stories. Heck, it might be an excuse to focus on DS a bit more (second child just never gets the same as the first one, eh?).

I'll keep you all posted, and thanks for the great signing links!

teapot2.GIF Homeschooling, Homesteading Mama to DD ('02) and DS ('04)  ribbonjigsaw.gif blogging.jpg homeschool.gif

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#41 of 50 Old 06-10-2006, 02:59 PM
 
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Hey Piglet,
I have a friend who is a speech pathologist at the North Health Unit (on Commercial Drive). Her name is Mia Nickel. She's wonderful! I've taken Rosy to her. Even though you don't live in this neighbourhood, I'm sure you could call her and ask for advice. You could tell her Maegen Leishman gave you her name. I do think its worth getting an appt. with someone who specializes in hearing and speech issues.
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#42 of 50 Old 06-11-2006, 03:12 AM
 
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you have gotten great information here, piglet. i think it is a tricky thing to trust your gut vs. not worry. just reading this thread makes me want to wake my babe up, look at her tonsils, and check her hearing! aa!

piglet, here's a story we like to tell each other in sign. the signs are links to video clips, so you could play with those. i don't think my 7 month old finds lots of signs at once overwhelming, any more than how many words i use in speaking to her... have fun with it and see what he enjoys.

ot: hey, you know i had superhuge tonsils all my life. the doctor would always say, wow, you have huge tonsils. but you're just fine!! 28 years later i had my food sensitivities tested by a naturopath. 20 food sensitivities! i was completely shocked to find that my tonsils were of a human size when i stopped eating all the irritants.

*
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#43 of 50 Old 06-11-2006, 11:00 AM
 
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My DD will be 2 this month and only has a few words. She understands most of what I ask/say though. I was told by many people to wait until she was 2 and then decide about getting an evaluation done. I have it scheduled in a couple months (first available time). I am leary though a bit bc a friend had her son evaluated at 16 months and then received therapy for 1 month which equalled 4 sessions. I guess I wonder if having those 4 sessions really helped or if he would have made the same progress in a month regardless.

I was also suprised to discover that services are not free as I was led to believe. They are provided on a sliding scale and the woman reassured me "don't worry, the most you would have to pay out of pocket is $125 per session" I was really shocked as this is a far cry from "free" but I am hoping that's for people with very high incomes. She did also did say they would try and bill my insurance first and then I would have to pay what insurance did not cover.

Quote:
Originally Posted by faithnj
You know how this all ended? My dd was perfectly normal, she just needed it a jump-start. However, I didn't know what kind of "jump-start" she needed, so it was great having a therapist visiting each week to teach me how to work with her. It took maybe a month before she caught up, then she started to SURPASS kids her same age. By the end of the 6 month period, the Physical Therapist said it had been a joy working with a normal and healthy child.
Too me, this is puzzling. Why would services be provided to a child who was "perfectly normal" (developmental wise I am assuming)? Since you only needed them for a month, didn't you wonder if she would have simply caught up on her own? This was one of my concerns with calling earlier. I cleary don't know your situation and am not questioning your judgement on the issue but more so thinking out loud.

Also, I know you meant this in a brag/complimentary way but I think its odd and a bit sad that a therapist would say "joy working with a normal and healthy child" I mean when one goes into a therapist type position is there not an assumption that one will not be workng with those who are not "healthy" but instead need assistance hence the term "therapist" I guess its a bit narrowminded but I always thought therapists of any nature would be more excited by those who start out behind the curve and then accomplish so much through therapy.

Maggie
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#44 of 50 Old 06-11-2006, 11:07 AM
 
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my DS only said a handful of words at that age, maybe less! Now he is 28 months and has a pretty wide vocabulary. He really started talking at around 22-23 months.

I wouldn't be concerned. Personally I think it is simply rediculous the pressure put on toddlers to speak : it kind of makes me sick actually. what's the big rush? why assume something is wrong?

btw my nephew didn't speak until he was 3! now at 6 and you'd never know differently!

eta- it has been said Albert Einstein didn't speak until he was 4. I always used to think of that when I would worry about DS not talking.

also FWIW I wanted to add for my DS something that really helped him is he started watching signing times dvd's I got for him and it just kind of "clicked" for him. you could just see this light bulb moment it in his face it was pretty amazing to me (especially as I had started signing to him around 4mo) he started really talking within watching it once and said 3 new words immedietly!

Blissful Mama to DD-(5), DS-(6) and someone new due in November!
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#45 of 50 Old 06-11-2006, 01:39 PM
 
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I am trying to dispel this myth whether I see it as it is often used to question parents who get speech therapy for their non-talking 2 or 3 year old. I'm not saying you're doing that here, but that's why it's important to me to dispel this myth.

Einstein didn't start talking late. His family apparently perpetuated the myth, but papers released in the last decade or so contradict that. He was speaking in full sentences by about 2.5 years when his baby sibling was brought home from the hospital. There are other examples as well, but he definitely was speaking much earlier than the myth says.
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#46 of 50 Old 06-11-2006, 04:49 PM
 
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thanks for clearing that up! I always wondered if it was really true.


in any case, I still wouldn't worry at 20mo

Quote:
Originally Posted by chann96
I am trying to dispel this myth whether I see it as it is often used to question parents who get speech therapy for their non-talking 2 or 3 year old. I'm not saying you're doing that here, but that's why it's important to me to dispel this myth.

Einstein didn't start talking late. His family apparently perpetuated the myth, but papers released in the last decade or so contradict that. He was speaking in full sentences by about 2.5 years when his baby sibling was brought home from the hospital. There are other examples as well, but he definitely was speaking much earlier than the myth says.

Blissful Mama to DD-(5), DS-(6) and someone new due in November!
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#47 of 50 Old 06-11-2006, 05:45 PM
 
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nak so quick!

Trust your inner feeling!

Do you FEEL something may be wrong

or

are you worried mostly because at this age she doesn't use a certain number of words or other babies the same age speak more or some other reason?

If it's not that you feel deep inside something is wrong, I'd say to give it some time, maybe another month or two. If you see zero progress, maybe look into the programs near you for evaluation, hopefully nothing too intrusive.

And for the time being, BREATHE and RELAX!

Let us know how everything works out!
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#48 of 50 Old 06-11-2006, 08:44 PM
 
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50 words by 24 months is typically the gauge used by speech pathologists (speaking as one) as a baseline.
How on earth do y'all count words of a child so young?? What constitutes an officially pronounced word at that age? My 22-month old daughter says "uh-beyah" for "umbrella". Is that a word? For "strawberry", she says "dah-doo-doo". Does that count? Here are some other interesting examples:

cookie: kah-koo
daffodil: dah-do-dih
dog: gah
water: voh
juice: doos
school: cool

Are these considered words for the purpose of the speech analysis?

To me, the whole exercise of counting words is ridiculous because, quite frankly, how do you know whether your child is uttering words or not? As long as there is some kind of babble going on, he could be saying all kinds of things and you just haven't translated it from baby talk.

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#49 of 50 Old 06-11-2006, 11:47 PM
 
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a "word" is any combination of sounds used consistently to represent a person/object/etc. so, cmlp, yes, those are words, even though they don't sound like it. if they're consistent, they're words. pronunciation/articulation fine-tunes gradually.

there is a difference between babbling & jargon and actual words. consistency is key. labeling objects is what comes first, then social & verbs. for example, "mama" then "hi". we counted dd's words b/c i'm a speech path & was curious. she had just 50 words at age 2. 6 months later she had an explosion & there was no way to count. you really can figure out how many they have.

the difference between 17 months & 24 months can be staggering, especially verbally. i know mamas of younger babes can be overwhelmed by that "magic number" of 50 words by 24 months, but it's a guideline and you'd be surprised at the changes that happen seemingly overnight!
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#50 of 50 Old 06-12-2006, 12:58 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobica
a "word" is any combination of sounds used consistently to represent a person/object/etc. so, cmlp, yes, those are words, even though they don't sound like it. if they're consistent, they're words. pronunciation/articulation fine-tunes gradually.

there is a difference between babbling & jargon and actual words. consistency is key.
For my daugher, jargoning involves long strings of sounds. If you just listen to the rhythm and the tone, it sounds like an English sentence - just not with actual words. In contrast, her use of actual words sounds! Like! This! ...one syllable, or at most two, with an exclamation point afterwards. Her words are single and emphatic - she loves putting a label on something. Dog! Shoes! Cheese!

And yes, cmlp, as long as the word is applied consistently, it doesn't matter if it's not all there. Alex mostly says the first syllable of words, so "strawberries" is "s'raw." But she says it exactly the same way every time she has strawberries, or sees a basket of them in my shopping cart, or sees a picture of one in a book (Favorite food. A little bit of an obsession, if you ask me.), so I definitely consider it to be a real word.

Alexandra 4.11.05 and Colin 2.9.09. Click on my name to visit my homeschooling blog.
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