Does "baby talk" slow language learning? - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
Old 08-13-2006, 04:18 PM - Thread Starter
 
darien's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 1,112
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My friends have a 18m ds. They use silly names or shortened names for EVERYTHING. For example, instead of saying "Do you want graham crackers or banana for snack, Danny?" they will say "Does Dan-dan want gammies or nanners for yum-yum?" Really.

These aren't even Danny's words for things-- at this point he has about a 6 word vocabulary!

I think the baby talk is odd, but probably not harmful. A mutual friend disagrees-- she thinks the baby talk is stunting his development. What do you think?
darien is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 08-13-2006, 04:48 PM
 
BellinghamCrunchie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Alpha Centauri
Posts: 4,204
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Research I read in college indicated that parent's reflecting baby talk back to the baby helped the development of speech, and that only speaking to the child on your own terms (using only adult words and phrases) hindered speech development. It was important to do both; speaking to the child on the child's terms, as well as modeling more proper speech.

The effects were mild, though. Either way, the child WILL learn to speak.
BellinghamCrunchie is offline  
Old 08-13-2006, 04:57 PM
 
Hayes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 1,335
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I don't know what it does to the kid, but it drive me nanners. I won't even let my bigger children talk to the baby in baby talk.
Hayes is offline  
Old 08-13-2006, 05:01 PM
 
wombatclay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: running the red queen's race
Posts: 14,048
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Wow...that's an interesting question!

The use of "baby talk" or "child-directed speech" is generally thought to aid in langauge development since the tones and inflection catch and maintain the child's interest. But I would think that at a certain point the role of the adult in the conversation is to demonstrate/model the "proper" words and structure of the language being learned (in a child friendly way, of course!).

So the "child centered speech" catches the little one's attention and draws them into a conversation (where they learn the patterns of the language, the cadence, the conversational starts and stops, etc) but then they also have their parent modeling the "standard" language (with clear pronounciation, proper grammar, using short phrases to enhance learnability, the addition of descriptors to a child's own word use...things many parent's do instinctively).

So I don't think using "baby talk" is going to "stunt" a toddler, but at 18mo it may be time for the parents to start modeling appropriate words/sentence structures more actively so that the little one has an easier time learning how to communicate with people who don't know his parent's "code". He'll "unlearn" that code once exposed to a peer group that doesn't know what a "yum yum gammie" is, but it may be easier for him in the long run if he knows the word "cracker" from the start.

There are some interesting articles about "child centered speech" and general language acquisition in children at http://www.childdevelopmentinfo.com/...elopment.shtml if you or your friend want to read more!

Be pretty! Be practical! Be Pagan! Visit Pagan Hearth & Home!
 mama to lady.gif(4/05), hearts.gif(6/07vbac), diaper.gif(8/09vbac), and babygirl.gif (9/11vbac)

wombatclay is offline  
Old 08-13-2006, 05:03 PM
 
Robin926's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 1,386
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have read that "baby talk" like cooing and exaggerating sounds in a higher pitch to a baby actually helps because it draws the sounds out for them. Like "Hiiiiiiii baaaaaabyyyyy!" I'm not sure about replacing words like "ba-ba" and the like, although we don't do it. I'm pretty sure the kid will learn to talk either way because they'll hear the adults use the "proper" words in conversations with each other. With our DS, though, we use the proper words for things, and if he points at a banana and says "Nana!" I say "Yes, that's a banana! Do you want a banana?" I'm not sure if it's better, it's just what we've naturally done with him.
Robin926 is offline  
Old 08-13-2006, 05:16 PM
 
momtoS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 2,755
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
I don't think it does...I used it a bit when DD was learning and she is almost two and talk like crazy!!!
momtoS is offline  
Old 08-13-2006, 05:18 PM
 
kat85's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: South
Posts: 491
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I think by the time a child is over 1yr. old, it time to stop talking baby talk, I mean you know use simple words for the child to understand. "Do baby want wa-wa" and it even funny when parents ask, "do baby want some H2O" like the child know science. Just plain and simple do you want some to drink or juice.
kat85 is offline  
Old 08-13-2006, 05:29 PM
 
tayndrewsmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: WI
Posts: 10,472
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Everything I have ever read and heard before says it's not a good thing to do at all, at any age. The child is only learning to communicate with mom and dad who are aware of the "special" language they have created. How does this help them to communicate with others?
tayndrewsmama is offline  
Old 08-13-2006, 05:35 PM
 
Jaydens_mom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 286
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I personally prohibited baby talk around my son .. and still do.. there is nothing wrong with his vocabulary and i feel that stressing the correct pronounciation with make him continue to strive to get it right.
Jaydens_mom is offline  
Old 08-13-2006, 05:39 PM
 
Isamama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 852
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi All, I am a speech language pathologist. I think some people are confusing "baby talk" with "motherese". Now I would have to go back to all my books to give you the official definitions of these, but I am too tired--so here's the gist of it: Motherese refers to the intonation, inflection, cadence, etc... most people (mamas and papas) naturally use to get the childs attention and keep her/him interested. This is wonderful stuff (helps with bonding and development). Baby talk generally refers to pronouncing words incorrectly in a high pitched manner etc... (high pitched is good, it's the pronouncing words incorrectly that isn't helpful).

A PP said she (I am not sure how the "quote" function works at the moment, so bare with me--I am going to paraphrase). Modeled good speech for her child when s/he asked for a "nana" by saying back to the child, "You would like a banana?" Gold star for you ! That is the perfect way to help a child with developing speech!

As for hindering the child in question's speech. Well, I can say this: it is not helpful to mispronounce things. There is a whole slew of things they can do to help developing speech from modeling, molding, expanding and the like. I think for a typically developing child, for a parent to slip in the occasional "nana" or what have you will not ultimately "harm" the child's language development. It is especially important to model age-appropriate correct language for a child who is not developing language normally (wide range of normal). Well, that's partially it in a tiny nutshell. What a great question to ask!

Healing Mama to :
Isamama is offline  
Old 08-13-2006, 05:43 PM
 
muckemom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: In the mountains of Idaho!!!
Posts: 2,164
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
This is an interesting question... I know that hearing baby-talk drives me NUTS and so I don't use it around DS... who knows if it would drive him bonkers too... plus, he's pretty good at copying my tone and some words... so I'd rather those words be the correct ones.
muckemom is offline  
Old 08-13-2006, 05:51 PM
 
Isamama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 852
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin926
With our DS, though, we use the proper words for things, and if he points at a banana and says "Nana!" I say "Yes, that's a banana! Do you want a banana?" I'm not sure if it's better, it's just what we've naturally done with him.
I think I may have figured the "quote" function out. Here's the one I was looking for! It is better Robin926! You're a natural!

Healing Mama to :
Isamama is offline  
Old 08-13-2006, 05:54 PM
 
bright's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 306
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I use some baby talk with mine. My gut feeling is that it helps with language development, though I have no studies to back that up. Too much baby talk would be silly though, and annoying.
bright is offline  
Old 08-13-2006, 09:14 PM
 
crunchy_mama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Missouri
Posts: 5,936
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
oh, this drives me bonkers. My friends son is a little over 2 and she still does this, he mispronounces the words so she just keeps doing that. Which to me just reinforces saying it wrong. I do as a previous poster said, Luke asks for wawa and I say oh, do you want water. I do that when he doesn't quite have the words either.

Happily Married to my : 11 yrs- Mama to wild-eyed monkey boy 7-04, fiery little girl 4-07, and the happy smiley baby that sleeps 11-09!
crunchy_mama is offline  
Old 08-14-2006, 01:07 AM
 
SamuraiEarthMama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 1,959
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I used to do a child care exchange with another mom... we both had daughters about 3 years old. The family would talk baby talk with the little girl, and she was very good at it, little lisp and all. DROVE ME CRAZY!

So I told her that when she was at my house, I would like her to use the big-people words for things. I wouldn't understand things she wanted, like "wawa" for water, until she said it right. Took about three days of this, and she totally understood. Around me, she quit the babytalk completely. But, since her parents used it (and thought it was cute), she kept it up for years at home.

My kids have never used it. That's not how we talk, and so why would we ever encourage it at any age?
SamuraiEarthMama is offline  
Old 08-14-2006, 02:25 AM
 
Shelsi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Lafayette, IN
Posts: 4,340
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
It seems to me that is making the kids have to learn everything twice. Like first they have to learn the baby talk word for it and then as they get older they're going to have to re-learn it all again to talk correctly.

I do what the pp does. Jake says he wants malk and I say, "ok I'll get you some milk." He did seem to take a little longer to talk but once he did he never stopped! (He even talks in his sleep!)

Rachel, mom to Jake (5/04) and Alexia (7/07) a surprise UC thanks to hypnobabies!
Shelsi is offline  
Old 08-14-2006, 02:37 AM
 
Charles Baudelaire's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 2,882
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by BellinghamCrunchie
Research I read in college indicated that parent's reflecting baby talk back to the baby helped the development of speech, and that only speaking to the child on your own terms (using only adult words and phrases) hindered speech development. It was important to do both; speaking to the child on the child's terms, as well as modeling more proper speech.

The effects were mild, though. Either way, the child WILL learn to speak.
This is admittedly anecdotal (n=1), but with my dd, we NEVER talked to her in baby talk. She was both a precocious talker and precocious reader, and I believe that both were the result of our choice not to talk to her like she was an idiot. Sorry, but that's how people talking baby talk sound to me -- very condescending, very patronizing. I realize they don't mean to sound that way and that not everyone will agree.
Charles Baudelaire is offline  
Old 08-14-2006, 12:34 PM
 
teachma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: My new house!
Posts: 4,572
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Baudelaire
This is admittedly anecdotal (n=1), but with my dd, we NEVER talked to her in baby talk. She was both a precocious talker and precocious reader, and I believe that both were the result of our choice not to talk to her like she was an idiot. Sorry, but that's how people talking baby talk sound to me -- very condescending, very patronizing. I realize they don't mean to sound that way and that not everyone will agree.
Not only did I refrain from using pretend words, but around both of my children (also precocious speakers) I make the conscious effort to use synonyms whenever I can. So my 2.5 year old occasionally asks for a drink when she's thirsty, but she sometimes requests a beverage. She will ask me to make her music louder, or to please increase the volume. It is wonderful to have a conversation with her because I just never know what I'll hear! I do the same type of vocabulary building with my fourth grade students. They are all receptive! In my experience, the greater the assortment of words a child hears, the more varied his or her language will be, and the chid will also be armed with the power of comprehension- he/she will be able to understand the conversation of adults and even the more sophisticated meanings in text. Baby-talking with make-believe words and sticking to a limited vocabulary do not empower your child in these ways.
teachma is offline  
Old 08-14-2006, 12:57 PM
 
Charles Baudelaire's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 2,882
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isamama
Hi All, I am a speech language pathologist. I think some people are confusing "baby talk" with "motherese". Now I would have to go back to all my books to give you the official definitions of these, but I am too tired--so here's the gist of it: Motherese refers to the intonation, inflection, cadence, etc... most people (mamas and papas) naturally use to get the childs attention and keep her/him interested. This is wonderful stuff (helps with bonding and development). Baby talk generally refers to pronouncing words incorrectly in a high pitched manner etc... (high pitched is good, it's the pronouncing words incorrectly that isn't helpful).

A PP said she (I am not sure how the "quote" function works at the moment, so bare with me--I am going to paraphrase). Modeled good speech for her child when s/he asked for a "nana" by saying back to the child, "You would like a banana?" Gold star for you ! That is the perfect way to help a child with developing speech!

As for hindering the child in question's speech. Well, I can say this: it is not helpful to mispronounce things. There is a whole slew of things they can do to help developing speech from modeling, molding, expanding and the like. I think for a typically developing child, for a parent to slip in the occasional "nana" or what have you will not ultimately "harm" the child's language development. It is especially important to model age-appropriate correct language for a child who is not developing language normally (wide range of normal). Well, that's partially it in a tiny nutshell. What a great question to ask!
What about when it goes beyond mere mispronunciation and right into using a completely different word to describe a common object or action, such as boo-boo for wound or binkie for pacifier? I'm not a speech pathologist (and I don't even play one on TV!), but it seems absurd to teach what amounts to two completely different dialects of English -- Standard English and Baby, and expect the baby to switch abruptly from one to the other. Just my unprofessional opinion.
Charles Baudelaire is offline  
Old 08-14-2006, 01:03 PM
 
Charles Baudelaire's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 2,882
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by teachma
Not only did I refrain from using pretend words, but around both of my children (also precocious speakers) I make the conscious effort to use synonyms whenever I can. So my 2.5 year old occasionally asks for a drink when she's thirsty, but she sometimes requests a beverage. She will ask me to make her music louder, or to please increase the volume. It is wonderful to have a conversation with her because I just never know what I'll hear! I do the same type of vocabulary building with my fourth grade students. They are all receptive! In my experience, the greater the assortment of words a child hears, the more varied his or her language will be, and the chid will also be armed with the power of comprehension- he/she will be able to understand the conversation of adults and even the more sophisticated meanings in text. Baby-talking with make-believe words and sticking to a limited vocabulary do not empower your child in these ways.
Well, I hope this isn't getting too OT, but I remember vividly when I was a child of about 3 or 4 how absolutely annoying it was to be talked to in this way, and if I had had the word to express my feelings, I really would've turned to the adult in question and said, "Stop speaking to me in this condescending manner, please." It's so patronizing, like the child has no brain at all -- if they don't understand ANY words, then what difference does it make if you use the actual correct ones? Geez, it's easier to say the one-syllable "wound" than the two-syllable "boo boo," it seems to me. Arrgh.

Also, when the child naturally picks up these words, and in good faith, trusting that you're not telling him a bunch of garbage, uses these words or these ungrammatical constructions (e.g., "Me hungwy for baba!") he sounds like an idiot, which makes people treat him like one -- it's a dreadful, vicious circle, IMHO. He's not an idiot, of course -- he's just imitating what he's been taught. How is that fair?
Charles Baudelaire is offline  
Old 08-14-2006, 01:15 PM
 
teachma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: My new house!
Posts: 4,572
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Baudelaire
Well, I hope this isn't getting too OT, but I remember vividly when I was a child of about 3 or 4 how absolutely annoying it was to be talked to in this way, and if I had had the word to express my feelings, I really would've turned to the adult in question and said, "Stop speaking to me in this condescending manner, please." It's so patronizing, like the child has no brain at all --
Yep- agreed. Kids definitely recognize the condescension in adults' voices/questions/word choices. I posted last night in the Toddler forum about my dd's response to an adult who asked her questions like, "What color is a duckie?" She started quizzng the adult right back! I cringe when people speak to my children that way, and I immediately think, "She's gonna think there's something wrong with you."
teachma is offline  
Old 08-14-2006, 01:15 PM
 
PennyRoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: The ocean state
Posts: 684
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm no expert, but I find baby talk hideous and expressly refrained from using it around DD. She was a very precocious talker and at 2 would use words like "famished" and "exhausted" (complete with tewwibiw pronunciation so it was pretty durned cute). This is purely anecdotal, but I have observed that parents who use baby talk seem to have kids who talk later and less articulately than those who do not.

My SIL is not the sharpest tool in the shed. I'll never forget when DH asked our then 5 YO niece, SIL's DD, if she wanted to "help prepare" something. The niece cocked her head and asked "What does 'prepare' mean?" Yikes!

SIL now looks at my 4.2 YO daughter and says in a singsongy, baby voice, "Oh you so pretty! Look at the pretty flowers!" Etc. My daughter stares at her like she's an alien . . which she sorta is. (She has tatooed on lip and eyeliner - quite the sight!)

Mama to 2 mopheaded rascals
PennyRoo is offline  
Old 08-14-2006, 03:14 PM
 
teachma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: My new house!
Posts: 4,572
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by PennyRoo

My SIL is not the sharpest tool in the shed. I'll never forget when DH asked our then 5 YO niece, SIL's DD, if she wanted to "help prepare" something. The niece cocked her head and asked "What does 'prepare' mean?" Yikes!
Your SIL may not be sharp, but her daughter sure is. I'll take a kid who can advocate for herself and ask for clarification any day! Your niece will be fine in spite of her parents.
teachma is offline  
Old 08-14-2006, 03:58 PM
 
sedalbj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Switzerland
Posts: 1,262
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We stopped watching cartoons and especially sesame street because of what I call baby grammar.. 'You want cookie?'... What the heck?
sedalbj is offline  
Old 08-14-2006, 04:28 PM
 
eowen77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Pennsylvania USA
Posts: 18
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
{OK so my DS isn't technically a "toddler" anymore {and my DD is long past "toddler"} but I was roaming the board and felt the need to chime in my 2 cents. Feel free to ignore me!}

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaydens_mom
I personally prohibited baby talk around my son .. and still do.. there is nothing wrong with his vocabulary and i feel that stressing the correct pronounciation with make him continue to strive to get it right.
That is me. I absolutely hated when people talked baby talk to my kids and would always correct them with regular talk. {I am not the kind of person to "correct" anyone - but this drove me nuts.} There was a little more of it with my DS - but not much and mostly with DHs family.

I refused to "baby talk" to them - tho we do use words like boo boo and blankey at times. My DD started school and the teachers were shocked at how developed her vocabulary was b/c it is unusual in a child that young {so they said}. I also have had people pointing out how easy it is too understand my DCs {as toddlers} than a lot of kids b/c they spoke words clearly and correctly. {Just b/c the parent knows "num nummie" means cookie to the child - doesn't mean anyone else does KWIM?}

My DD also was not allowed to watch Teletubbies on TV {we don't have "regular TV...just DVDs and videos...now so it hasn't been as much of an issue with DS}. Everytime DD watched that show she would walk around for two days talking baby talk and being totally unintelligible.

Of course my main reason for not allowing baby talk goes back to my childhood when I went to school/church/etc with a family that talked baby talk to their kids. The parents were very intelligent, clearly spoken people...who turned into absolutely sill looking adults when they spoke to their kids. We used to be driven insane by their kids b/c they always spoke babytalk {ALWAYS} in school as well as everywhere else. I am NOT talking about small children either - these kids were 14, 12, and 9 when I last remember them being around {they moved away when I and their middle child were in 6th grade}. There should be an age limit on how long you can speak to them in baby talk. ~L~

OK...just my opinion...had a need to express it...
eowen77 is offline  
Old 08-14-2006, 04:30 PM
 
MerelyGod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 799
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I don't know whether it hinders development or not (seems like it wouldn't help though!), but it drives me CRAZY. My MIL and SIL whom I otherwise adore talk to the babies like this sometimes, and I hate it. I feel so bad for DD when they say things to her like "does her want the ball?" in a "babyish" voice no less. I just think DD is smarter than that. :
MerelyGod is offline  
Old 08-14-2006, 07:27 PM
 
Isamama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 852
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Baudelaire
What about when it goes beyond mere mispronunciation and right into using a completely different word to describe a common object or action, such as boo-boo for wound or binkie for pacifier? I'm not a speech pathologist (and I don't even play one on TV!), but it seems absurd to teach what amounts to two completely different dialects of English -- Standard English and Baby, and expect the baby to switch abruptly from one to the other. Just my unprofessional opinion.
I think that falls under the "what makes sense to you personally" category. "Boo boo" and "binkie" are terms that could be likened to slang. Most of us use it (some form of slang, that is) and know the proper term, but choose to use it anyway. I totally see where you are coming from. People have to be really careful when it comes to children with a language impairment (or a person for whom english is a second language--if they are in the US). It just makes sense (with research to back it up) to speak correctly with children who are developing language. Slang is a matter of personal choice but not necessarily "incorrect."

Healing Mama to :
Isamama is offline  
Old 08-14-2006, 07:28 PM
 
tayndrewsmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: WI
Posts: 10,472
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by sedalbj
We stopped watching cartoons and especially sesame street because of what I call baby grammar.. 'You want cookie?'... What the heck?
Hmmm, this thread really makes me wonder now. Both of my kids have always despised Sesame Street and any other show with baby talk, except for Teletubbies when they were really little, but I think the attraction there was the weird noises and the colors. Maybe that was their way, and still is their way, of telling me that baby talk is annyoing.
tayndrewsmama is offline  
Old 08-14-2006, 09:31 PM
 
honeybee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: West MI
Posts: 2,899
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I definitely use mothereez: I coo at my baby, use the higher-pitched voice, etc. We also use a few "baby slang" words, like "owie." But the mothereez naturally fades away as baby gets older, and I model correct grammar otherwise. I also use a normal tone of voice with my toddler, rather than that annoying sing-song voice. I really like the idea of using synonyms in speech. I'll have to remember to try to do that.

As for the example in the OP, I don't think the problem for the child will be language development so much as social development. Treat a child like a helpless, fragile "baby" and that is what he/she will act like.

Along the same lines, what do you think about using the 3rd person when speaking about yourself? Like: "Bring that to mommy." For some reason, I found myself using the third person a lot with ds1. It was totally unconscious. But then for a while I did both: stated the third person version and then repeated the phrase with "I." Now that ds uses the first person correctly most of the time, I do too. It's just something I did without really thinking about it.

Melissa crochetsmilie.gif, wife to Tom geek.gif, mom to The Baron modifiedartist.gif, the Bean superhero.gif, Little Bear diaper.gif, and Baby Beaver babyboy.gif
honeybee is offline  
Old 08-14-2006, 10:29 PM
 
Persephone's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 3,651
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
What an interesting conversation!

My parents never babytalked to us kids, and told us so as we got older. I internalized that value, and I can't stand to hear baby talk. I never baby talk to a child, because I think it does patronize them, and can impair speech development.

I have and do naturally speak to my baby in a higher pitched voice, and I think that's biological, because babies hear higher tones easier. I also found myself using third person right off the bat when I'd talk to my baby, and at 5 months, her first word was "mama". And not only can she say mama, she knows who mama is. (How I discovered that is a really sweet mama-moment story. ) Now that she's a bit (only a tiny bit) older, I find myself interchanging first and third person when I talk to her. Sometimes I say, "Mama loves you", and sometimes I say, "I love you" for example. I think that by interchanging it, it helps her understand what pronouns are. I don't really do this consciously, but I do notice it when I do it.

Alternatively, I have read about a style of communicating with toddlers where you mirror their language back to them. Like, if a kid is getting fussy, you get down on their level, look them in the eyes, and say, "Bored. Danny bored. Tired. Want go home. We go home soon." Or something like that, and they get the message. I've never tried it, and I can't say I"m likely to. But it is interesting.
Persephone is offline  
 
User Tag List

Thread Tools


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off