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#1 of 26 Old 12-27-2006, 02:41 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Our dd got a Leap "computer" toy for x-mas and we were offered the receipt so that we can return it we like. We usually go low-tech toys, but is this "educational" and therefore we should keep it?
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#2 of 26 Old 12-27-2006, 03:21 AM
 
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What age is your DD? I was given one of the Lil Touch leappads when my dd was really young. It was useless. Just a expensive way to read a book to a kid. The extras for these toys are pretty expensive too.
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#3 of 26 Old 12-27-2006, 03:40 AM
 
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Using one's imagination is always more educational than an electronic gadget! Return it and get some wooden blocks or some really great art supplies!
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#4 of 26 Old 12-27-2006, 03:42 AM
 
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My 7 month ds got two leap frog toys and I have decided one is enough. We will keep the one dh got him and exchange the other one for a more imaginative toy.

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#5 of 26 Old 12-27-2006, 03:53 AM
 
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It's really up to you. I actually bought my first electronic toy for DD1 this year--the LeapFrog Fridge Phonics. I can't for the life of me think of any other electronic toy we own, so I am okay with having one. DD is really into the alphabet and finding letters. She also loves music. We've had it for one day, and she can already recognize three letters and say their sounds.

Anyway, I'm not advocating for it, I just think you have to weigh the pros and cons and decide based on your child and your philosophies. Yes, in general I'd pick the imaginative toy over the electronic one every time. This time I didn't, but I put a lot of thought into it. HTH!
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#6 of 26 Old 12-27-2006, 04:25 AM
 
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I honestly don't care for these types and am having the same sort of dilemma. MIL bought DS this leap frog baby learn around gym (http://www2.leapfrog.com/do/findprod...key=playground)
and I really don't think he'll want to play with it, but I have no clue where to return it to. She ordered it online and didn't offer a reciept, I have no clue where she ordered it, and DH feels like we should keep it because it was a gift. Ugh. Right now, DS is having fun climbing on the box (we have not taken it out to put it together). Maybe we should just take it to Goodwill?

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#7 of 26 Old 12-27-2006, 07:13 AM
 
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I think the "baby" stuff is pretty useless, but as they get older I think Leap and Leapfrog have some good things to offer. The early stuff they just grow out of/get bored with too quick for the price in my opinion.
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#8 of 26 Old 12-27-2006, 07:52 AM
 
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We hated our leap pad book and finally gave it away.

However, dd learned her letters using the leap fridge phonics and just received thee word whammer for Christmas and so far I think it is great. Definitely not a necessity, but as far as games/toys go, I think these two are pretty neat.

BTW, we don't have many electronic toys and don't allow dd to watch TV, but I see no harm in these two toys, IMHO.

FWIW, I would exchange the leap book.
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#9 of 26 Old 12-27-2006, 08:03 AM
 
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The one LeapFrog we received last year, we donated. I have thought a lot about so called "educational" gadgets, and believe this to be a misleading concept. I have watched my children do a variety of activities, and I have truly observed a really different quality of learning taking place between things like:

*Watching them read stories and point out pictures while I talk to them about the colors and other things they are seeing, practice pouring with a variety of containers, stacking rings on pegs, playing with sensory materials such as a tub full of shaving cream or beans, playing music with their tambourines, drums, xylophone, and recorders, etc. etc.

vs.

*Pushing buttons and having some prerecorded voice talk back to them, etc.

Also, when a child is playing, or having a story read to them, there are a lot of little things that we respond to in the conversations. A child looking at a picture of a red leaf might not be thinking about the fact that it is red. We might instead pick up on the fact that the child is remembering the leaves falling out of the tree outside their bedroom window during a recent windstorm...and how the leaves flew off the tree and then floated to the ground, or whatever. The child might be thinking about how a leaf feels when you touch it, or how her dog chases leaves that are falling, or all sorts of things. But if some supposedly educational toy is sitting there responding to the child's interest in the leaf picture (because the child pushed this button or whatever), and the toy can't respond to the nature of the child's interest, then the child thus will get less out of this electronic "interaction" than she would get out of an interaction even simply with a non-talking picture.

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#10 of 26 Old 12-27-2006, 08:07 AM
 
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I agree, Sierra. I should have mentioned that these toys are only educational if you use them with your child. That's why we don't use the Baby Einstein DVDs...I don't have the patience to sit through them and interact.: I'd much rather sit with the letters and play.
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#11 of 26 Old 12-27-2006, 08:47 AM
 
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Yeah, but that is where the quality of learning comes in, I think. Because even with me right there, interacting with my kids as they interact with some gadget, I just see a difference in the quality of learning. I don't know how to describe it exactly. But there is a clear difference upon observation.

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#12 of 26 Old 12-27-2006, 02:03 PM
 
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We're in the minority here, but we LOVE electronic toys/games like LF stuff.
DD loves them, she learns from them, they make her happy and therefore me happy. We also provide lots of non-electronic stuff, blocks, legos, babys, kitchens, trains, books, puzzles, boooks, did i say books? lol.

BUT..we use elcetronics/computers a LOT...we use them for homeschooling, entertainment, play........the world is increasingly technological, and we feel that legitimate computer skills are a valuable skill amongst many others.
It's possible dd will choose a career/life path which will not have anything to do with college or technology..and that would be fine with us.....but we still feel basic computer and electronics skills are important.....and that kids electronics while generally overdone, do have some value. And again, we use technology-based homeschooling methods (computerized curriculum, internet research, etc...) so it is just very integrated into our lifestyle here......heck, the fact that i have above-average computer skills allows me to work fromhome and therefore bring desperastely needed income into my family without sending my dd to daycare...to ME, that is HUGELY valuable.

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#13 of 26 Old 12-27-2006, 02:07 PM
 
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Originally Posted by FreeRangeMama View Post
Using one's imagination is always more educational than an electronic gadget! Return it and get some wooden blocks or some really great art supplies!
JMO :

:
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#14 of 26 Old 12-27-2006, 02:11 PM
 
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The leapfrog baby toys are essentially useless. I think they are better for preschool aged and up. I would just exchange it for store credit if I were you. We have the leapfrog little touch book and it is awful. They put the on/off switch and volume switch right on the front, so guess what the baby messes with when you are trying to use it? You guessed it! Now, I did get the my first leap pad for my almost 3 yr old and he is much more into it than the little touch book.
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#15 of 26 Old 12-27-2006, 02:39 PM
 
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The leapfrog baby toys are essentially useless.
: My oldest ds had one when he was a toddler. He played with it exactly ONCE. It went in a garage sale a couple of years ago. They are the opposite of educational in my opinion. My dh's uncle asked us if he could get one for ds2 for Christmas. We said "no, thanks". Guess what he got him instead? A toddler sized drum set - LOL! I prefer that, actually.
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#16 of 26 Old 12-27-2006, 02:59 PM
 
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My dd got a baby leap pad when she's turned 1. She wasn't interested in it then and still isn't at almost 20 months. She likes regular books and being read to by me or her dad. I would donate it, but my dh's family gave it to her. I think I may anyway. It does take up valuable space in her closet.
Thankfully this time they listened and gave her real child-size musical instruments for Christmas. No batteries, plastic, or flashing lights

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#17 of 26 Old 12-27-2006, 04:27 PM
 
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We have received a lot of those kind of toy. The Baby Leap Pad is not very interesting for my kids. The My First Leap Pad was the best I think. It was useful for long car rides, and a good sized format. The Leap Pad is too big for kids to hold comfortably, IME.

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#18 of 26 Old 12-27-2006, 04:59 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Sierra View Post
The one LeapFrog we received last year, we donated. I have thought a lot about so called "educational" gadgets, and believe this to be a misleading concept. I have watched my children do a variety of activities, and I have truly observed a really different quality of learning taking place between things like:

*Watching them read stories and point out pictures while I talk to them about the colors and other things they are seeing, practice pouring with a variety of containers, stacking rings on pegs, playing with sensory materials such as a tub full of shaving cream or beans, playing music with their tambourines, drums, xylophone, and recorders, etc. etc.

vs.

*Pushing buttons and having some prerecorded voice talk back to them, etc.

Also, when a child is playing, or having a story read to them, there are a lot of little things that we respond to in the conversations. A child looking at a picture of a red leaf might not be thinking about the fact that it is red. We might instead pick up on the fact that the child is remembering the leaves falling out of the tree outside their bedroom window during a recent windstorm...and how the leaves flew off the tree and then floated to the ground, or whatever. The child might be thinking about how a leaf feels when you touch it, or how her dog chases leaves that are falling, or all sorts of things. But if some supposedly educational toy is sitting there responding to the child's interest in the leaf picture (because the child pushed this button or whatever), and the toy can't respond to the nature of the child's interest, then the child thus will get less out of this electronic "interaction" than she would get out of an interaction even simply with a non-talking picture.

Thank you very much for your comments! DS has received a few of these types of things, but I had not thought about them the way you put it... That if he's thinking of leaves blowing, but the book can only "talk about" the color of the leaf, that's not very helpful. (Read much Piaget?) So far, we've played with only one of the interactive books he received for Christmas, and I do not see the point at all. When pushed at the "appropriate" spots the buttons play only a series of seemingly unrelated sounds; just a gimmick as far as I'm concerned.

Also, DH and I are "older" parents. All we had were plain old books. We went to major universities, but never even had computers through college except maybe a few in the computer lab for a rare project. We had to count out the lines on the pages in our papers to type them on typewriters. (I do love a word processor!) We still managed to get a five degrees between us, so we kind of laugh about these "necessary" educational tools. That said, I'm still wondering about the LeapFrog letters as that could be okay while we're cooking. But, from what I've read of reviews on Amazon I'm not so sure...
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#19 of 26 Old 12-28-2006, 07:10 AM
 
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So far, we've played with only one of the interactive books he received for Christmas, and I do not see the point at all. When pushed at the "appropriate" spots the buttons play only a series of seemingly unrelated sounds; just a gimmick as far as I'm concerned.
Whew! Thanks for giving me words to express something I have long thought about the "interactive" books (yeah, like other books aren't interactive?!). They are a marketing gimmick. They are there to help keep children's books (and thus their sale/profit) from becoming obsolete as parents increasingly demand such toys for their children in the name of "educational" stuff. The marketing works because people buy them.

Probably the same dots could be connected with a lot of the electronic children's gadgets.

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#20 of 26 Old 12-28-2006, 07:29 AM
 
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the world is increasingly technological, and we feel that legitimate computer skills are a valuable skill amongst many others. It's possible dd will choose a career/life path which will not have anything to do with college or technology..and that would be fine with us.....but we still feel basic computer and electronics skills are important.
I don't disagree with you on that point. However, I think the same goal can be acheived another way, a way I would argue is better (though you certainly are entitled to your opinion).

The little blurbs I have read here and there on the subject, and probably some Mothering articles I've read over the years have all cited research showing that kids who aren't exposed to electronic stuff and computers early on will not be behind their peers later on once they are introduced. The kids quickly pick up these skills.

I didn't even need to read that. My life experience testifies to that. My dad is a computer "genius." He is an amazing software engineer and easily competes with folks in the same field who are half his age and even younger. He has strong math and problem solving skills developed through really hard work (he failed math all through middle school, but later went on to become a mathematician before becoming a software engineer). He was raised in a time before computers. My siblings and I grew up in a home with computers. I was among the early websurfers. I have some skills, but am no means particularly competant. My math and problem solving skills are lacking, so it makes sense it doesn't come as easily for me as it does for my father. A side note: we also were raised without a tv in our home, but that doesn't stop one of my sisters from being the pop culture trivia expert LOL.

I certainly want my kids to grow up to be safe drivers. But I am not going to start having my 20 month old behind the wheel. He can wait until he is a teen, and recent research says waiting longer might be even better. I know the example seems absurd, but the point is that certain foundational skills lead to later competancy in both driving and electronics. Without these foundational skills, experiences with cars and electronic gadgets have less value (and at least in the case of cars, dangerous consequences) than they do when introduced before those skills are developed.

A child who has developed some really good skills around math and problem solving will be at an advantage over a child who hasn't, when it comes to a career in a technological field, even if the first child had a delayed introduction to electronics. Why rush it?

And as a qualifier, I will say I am far from anti-technology. My kids have a few electronic toys (none we have purchased, but some given to us as gifts that I have held onto) that we use for longer car rides or trips for ds to the hospital. They work well in helping our kids to daze out for a bit to get through something tougher like that. At home, we don't have electronic toys out, nor do we have a tv, but my kids have been known to play with the CD player or "help" me type on the computer or whatever. A lot of our toys and homeschooling items are simple, natural materials, but some are even (gasp) plastic. So I think I have a relatively balanced approach and perspective.

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#21 of 26 Old 12-28-2006, 09:04 AM
 
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We're in the minority here, but we LOVE electronic toys/games like LF stuff.
DD loves them, she learns from them, they make her happy and therefore me happy. We also provide lots of non-electronic stuff, blocks, legos, babys, kitchens, trains, books, puzzles, boooks, did i say books? lol.

We also like electronic toys. I think we have a good mix of toys and both dh and I spend lots of time playing with G and all his toys. I don't buy them for their 'educational' qualities though- we just think about what would interest G and go from there.

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#22 of 26 Old 12-31-2006, 07:35 PM
 
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I can't remember where I read it, but I did read an article recently that talked about a grad student's thesis research--she found that kids learned to read better with old-fashioned books, rather than the leapfrog-style books. She found that it was the interaction with the parent and the book that made the difference.

(This makes sense to me as a secondary English teacher, by the way--I see very few kids who can't decode but many many 9th graders who can't "make meaning")

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#23 of 26 Old 12-31-2006, 07:55 PM
 
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We have received a lot of those kind of toy. The Baby Leap Pad is not very interesting for my kids. The My First Leap Pad was the best I think. It was useful for long car rides, and a good sized format. The Leap Pad is too big for kids to hold comfortably, IME.
This has basically been our experience. My dd LOVED her leap pad when she was a little younger. She has the leapster now and will play it for a few weeks and then ignore it for a month or so.

Ds got the baby leap pad when he was younger. He never liked it. I bought the my first leap pad for him because it had a pen and I thought he might leave dd alone when she played with the regular leap pad. (he didn't) He's just now getting to really like the my first leap pad. (almost 3 years old)

The leapster and leap pad are great for car trips. My parents live an hour away so we make that drive several times a month.

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#24 of 26 Old 12-31-2006, 09:18 PM
 
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I would pass on the Baby Leap pad for toddlers but go with the Leapster L-Max for school-aged kids if received as a gift -- I personally couldn't stomach spending that much. I don't like lots of Leapfrog toys but some I do; I agree with the previous poster about the letters being good. Of course it's always good to give your kid the individual attention from you, but sometimes you need to take care of a younger sib; in such cases, the electronic voice might work as an inferior substitute or at least distraction. One thing to look at is whether the toy is truly interactive or whether it just spouts off stuff for the child to memorize without context.
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#25 of 26 Old 12-31-2006, 09:57 PM
 
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Since posting, I have really thought about how I use these products...

I have come to the realization that I only really like the letters. Not the little talking machines you stick them into. I like having the magnetic letters. I like that they are on a background that is the same size and shape, as opposed to our other magnetic letters. I thought I really liked the word whammer, but essentially I like having the word list that it has. It gives me ideas of words to make with dd. But she is't interested in putting the word together in the talking box, we just do it together on the floor or a magnetic board.

So...basically, now that I think about it...these products are not that great....but I still really like having the letters and the word lists. I could have found them anywhere, though, and couldhave made my own if I weren't so lazy and pregnant!
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#26 of 26 Old 01-01-2007, 11:08 AM
 
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We don't have a lot of electronic toys here, but I think they're fine in moderation, and my daughter enjoys playing with them. The Leap and Vtech brands seem to be the best -- not because I think they're the most "educational," but because each toy seems to have the most play value as compared to other electronic toys I've seen.

My 2-year-old has a Leap Pad which we use together with her; we got it because we're raising her bilingually, and wanted her to have more different ways to be exposed to German. She enjoys it, and I think it will be interesting/useful for a long time.

She also has a Leap brand driving toy, which is ostensibly an alphabet learning toy. She uses this in the car; she's obsessed with driving.

She has a toy cell phone, which makes noises. She's not so enamored of this toy anymore, but it was a hit for about 9-12 months; she liked pushing the buttons and hearing the responses, as well as pretending to call her friends and relatives. We recently gave a Vtech brand electronic toy cell phone to a neighbor kid for her birthday, and I think my daughter would have liked this one better than the one she has.

She also has one of those hammering toys where you hammer the pegs through from one side to the other, but with this one the pegs light up and make noise. It's nice partly because the pegs move pretty easily, so she's been able to use it for a long time -- she can't really use the wooden hammering toy we have, other than to tell us which pegs she'd like us to hammer for her.

Oh, and for Christmas we gave her a toy microwave oven which allows you to set a cooking time, then makes noise, spins a carousel, and lights up inside like a real microwave until it dings to tell you the food is done. I had watched her play with toy microwave ovens at other people's houses, and noted that she seemed to prefer the greater realism of the electronic models. She loves it.

Anyway, I think that's the sum total of her electronic toys. I'd say she probably spends about 15 minutes a day playing with electronic toys.

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