2009 Food Storage Challenge (March Update) - Page 3 - Mothering Forums

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Old 01-25-2009, 07:40 PM
 
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I'm hoping to revive some of that custom....if I could only get my family hooked on the taste of a condiment that doesn't come from the store!
Would be nice, wouldn't it?
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Old 02-01-2009, 10:32 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I'm so very glad to see that this thread is moving along on it's own.
There are plenty of threads on Mothering that deal with food storage, but this one is the only one (that I know of) that is a challenge thread for food storage. :

I wanted to issue a new challenge, something that Sharon Astyk started on her blog last year. Take a look at my blog to see the challenge, which deals with adding a new skill, or planting, harvesting or storing something new/different every day.

Also, while I'm at it, I wanted to share some of the things I'm doing, towards my challenge. I used to make yogurt in the microwave, and at that I had on and off again results. Our family eats so much of the Stonyfields Farms yogurt (ymmmmy Banilla and plain old yogurt with the cream on top). So I choose to relearn to make yogurt. I failed miserably the first time and wasted about 2 quarts of milk. My dad always made me get back on my horse when I took a fall as a little girl, and so I started the next morning with yogurt making, and this time it went VERY well. I ended up with two yummy quarts of creamy and firm yogurt. The kids were so excited about it because they were too young to remember my yogurt making attempts in the past. The couldn't believe I could make something so good. Ha ha!

So, my plan is to make 2 quarts of yogurt weekly, and I'll probably do that on Mondays.

Also, I have heard so much about the No Knead Bread, that I finally searched it on the internet and found a great video on youtube which shows this technique. If you'd like to try it too, check this out. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=13Ah9ES2yTU Just realize that I am using whole wheat to make my bread, and it doesn't form the pockets inside the bread like the white flour does. It still rises, and it's still really good. You store it at room temp and let it rise for 12 to 13 hours, then take it out, flatten it and let it rise for 2 to 3 more. My kids love this bread. So I hope you can let us know some of your new skills that you are picking up. What's next for me??? I need to get my sewing machine repaired, because my next plan is to cut up the kids old jeans into patches, to repair their newer, but torn jeans.

Thanks for hanging in here with me and I'm very excited about all of this. Keep on working on the first challenge (basic food challenge) as you add the second challenge. It won't seem so difficult once you get going.

My blog link is in my siggy.

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Old 02-03-2009, 06:50 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Honeydee,

Have you tried making kimchee? I'm going to try to make a basic kimchee, and try it on my kids. They already are willing to eat Indian pickles (chutneys too). I thought if they like kimchee, then that is another thing I can store this summer, and it would be part of my garden planning.

I think I'm going to make a jar or two this week, and try it out on the kids.
And while I'm at it, I LOVE beets, so I think I'm going to play around with some recipes for canned beats, and if the kids don't like it, that's more for me.

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Old 02-04-2009, 12:59 AM
 
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I added an 8pk pf paper towels (DHs sinful pleasure ) and a hug pack and 3 four packs of TP.

If anyone is interested you can get 4 packs of TP free from Kroger with a coupon on the cottonelle website

I'm crunchy... Like a Dorito.
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Old 02-05-2009, 02:04 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Kricket,

Thanks for the heads up on the TP. I haven't added it yet, but plan to start that soon. I buy 48 rolls a month, and we don't always use them all. So we already have a few left over each month, towards our storage. I learned too well, the time that all four of us got the stomach flu at the same time. I had to send my just-getting-well son over to the neighbors to borrow a roll!

The Wagoneer Family and everyone,

I can't tell you enough how good the food storage class was. Now, they have the garden planning class going, and Sharon (as of yesterday) still had a few spots left. I think they are $100 per spot.

Normally, she had 2 or 3 spots that are for low income folks, and that means no charge folks. She doesn't have any of those for the current class, but in August she will have another food storage class, and she will take a few low income folks. If you are interested in her classes, you should get in touch with her to let her know.

An Article about extending the growing season....I've got an excellent article by Nancy Humphrey Case that I'd be happen to share if anyone is interested in it. Just email me at Indiamommy at yahoo dot com.

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Old 02-06-2009, 05:27 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Hi everyone,

As food storage junkies, what do you do when a junk attack happens? I was at the grocery today and I had a VERY hard time ignoring all the sugary treats. I'd stay off of that aisle, but it has the crackers I like, on the same aisle.

I don't recall this happening to me before, not like this.

So for do you store anything like that? When I got home, I really wish that I had found the largest chocolate bar to bring home. Then I could have shaved it and put it on something. I'm really trying to imagine living from my storage foods, when I develop cravings like this.

So, my weakness is exposed!

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Old 02-06-2009, 11:15 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Jyotsna View Post
Hi everyone,

As food storage junkies, what do you do when a junk attack happens? I was at the grocery today and I had a VERY hard time ignoring all the sugary treats. I'd stay off of that aisle, but it has the crackers I like, on the same aisle.

I don't recall this happening to me before, not like this.

So for do you store anything like that? When I got home, I really wish that I had found the largest chocolate bar to bring home. Then I could have shaved it and put it on something. I'm really trying to imagine living from my storage foods, when I develop cravings like this.

So, my weakness is exposed!
We have what we call morale storage. I store baking supplies that would allow me to bake sugary treats. We also store hard candies and chocolate. Chocolate stores well in the right temperature conditions for several months. If you don't mind a little bloom (those white spots) it can store even longer.

Ever wonder why military MREs have chocolate? It's not just for the calories!
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Old 02-06-2009, 01:16 PM
 
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I buy snacks in bulk from my co-op. Mostly, to keep DS occupied on car trips, so mostly Annies' bunnies (choc, cinnamon, & cheddar). But I too also have lots of wheat to grind into flour, lots of sugar and such to bake with as wanted/needed. I have thought of stock piling choc chips... but haven't done so. Yet. Mostly cause' I know they'd be *WAY* too tempting for me sitting down there. I LOVE choc chips just plain. MMmmm!!
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Old 02-06-2009, 02:26 PM
 
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We have what we call morale storage. I store baking supplies that would allow me to bake sugary treats. We also store hard candies and chocolate. Chocolate stores well in the right temperature conditions for several months. If you don't mind a little bloom (those white spots) it can store even longer.

Ever wonder why military MREs have chocolate? It's not just for the calories!
Yup, morale storage is very important. I think I remember one of Sharon Astyk's blog posts mentioning this. It's ok to pick up some junk once in a while because it can boost your spirits and make things feel a little more "normal" if you are in a dire situation.

And OMG I love plain chocolate chips too! Just right out of the bag is fine with me.
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Old 02-07-2009, 05:46 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I love it! I'm going to shop tomarrow, for a little "Moral Storage". This will definately help me as I stretch every dollar and every morsel of the other things stored!

Thanks!

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Old 02-08-2009, 07:31 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Someone was asking if I could post some of Sharon Astyk's "homework" and ideas from her class. She said it is okay to do so.

The following are her simple assignments. Everyone moves at different paces, so she did one each Friday. Also, she posted topics to her blog for things we were talking about in the group each week. If you are interested, go back and read all of January's blog posts, which coresponded with her class on food storage. Sometimes it was hard to keep up with the reading. Frankly I'm still reading and rereading.

I'll post all the topics which I thought were very helping in planning, implementing and creating food storage, and I'll also share recipes ect that were brought up in the group.

Food Storage Class Assignments:

Try something new:
For this weekend the homework is the same as last weekend (and yes, it
can run into next week if your weekends are booked) - pick a project,
a step you'd like to take, a new technique you'd like to try, and do
it. Try not to pick something that will make you crazy with
frustration or that you won't get done - if you don't think you can
spend more than 15 minutes, well, pick something that takes 15 minutes.

Living the food storage diet:
Hey folks - ok, one of today's subjects is finding the balance between
quantity and quality ;-) - that is, for some people, eating out of your
pantry means real dietary shifts, and those can be tough. If, for
example, you mostly eat fresh foods, particularly meats, dairy products
and fresh vegetables, this eating preserved and seasonal foods can be
tough in the off season. It helps if you check out the links I
included on root cellaring and season extension, of course, but what
are your concerns about dietary shifts?

Coping with large quanities of grains:

What I usually do is this - I get most of my grains
packaged in large lined paper sacks, but they occasionally come in
burlap, nylon or plastic bags of some sort. I usually dump them into
the bins (this is easier with help), put in the 02 absorbers and
diatomaceous earth.

In all the time I've been buying in bulk, I've had pantry moths
several times, but not from bulk foods, generally. So I've gotten
kind of lax about freezing. But you absolutely can. You probably
don't want to put a five gallon bucket in your freezer - you might
find it easier to take the bag and repackage into plastic (I've used
big freezer bags, that can then be reused over and over again for the
same purpose) or wrap the bag of, say oats in plastic, and then
freeze it.

Spices, Condiments and Sauces:

When you eat a diet that is built at least in part around the staple
foods we're storing, the value of high quality seasoning, condiments
and sauces becomes self evident. A little highly seasoned food
alongside a larger quantity of a starch really makes the difference
between bland and terrific.


Are there any particular ones your family relies on? Any you'd like to
learn to make yourself? Are there herbs and spices you grow or store?


Life of Spices:

They never really spoil, but they do lose their flavor and potency
after about year. You can extend it by keeping them in airtight
containers, away from light and heat (ie, not over the stove). On
the other hand, whole cinnamon sticks and peppercorns last a long
time, so if you have a means of grinding them, this is much more
effective.

Mushroom Growing
www.fungiperfecti.com - they are a great source

KimChee Recipe

There are a lot of kinds of kimchi - not all
are hot. I'll give you a sort of a classic recipe, but there are many
more out there - www.wildfermentation.com has several, and I'm sure
there are tens of thousands out there. In Korea, kimchi is served with
every meal, including breakfast - we're not quite that extreme (except
when I'm pregnant ;-)), but we eat a lot of it.

What I do is cut up some greens - napa would be the most traditional,
but I like a lot of different greens. Some shredded roots are good
too - daikon, turnip, carrot. But really whatever you want. Wash the
greens and submerge them in water to cover which is a ratio of 1 tsp
salt to 1 quart of water (ie, if you have enough greens to need four
quarts to cover...). Soak overnight, with a plate or other cover ontop
and weighted down to press the kimchi down.

The next day, drain the greens and reserve the liquid. In the bottom
of a quart sized mason jar, put as much hot chile pepper (you can buy
the traditional sort at korean grocers or use cayenne - you can get
seeds for kimchi peppers from www.evergreenseeds.com) as you like, and
if it is very warm out, another 1/4 tsp salt (it is better to use non-
iodized salt for all of this, for reasons of color and texture, but
iodized will work if necessary), and as much ginger and garlic as you
like (we like lots) minced up fine. You can also add scallions, garlic
chives or whatever you like really. Stuff the greens into the jar,
packing fairly tightly but leaving a solid inch of headspace. Add a
bit more chile if you like it, and then put liquid (reserved) in to
cover.

Put a double canning lid on, tightly enough that it stays on, but not
screwed on super tightly (or the jar will explode from fermenting
gasses), and ferment at room temperature, tasting after the first few
days, until it reaches the desired sourness. Then refrigerate or put
in a cool place. It will ferment a lot faster in warm weather, so
watch it carefully if your house is warm.

Sharon's Favorite Homemade Ketchup:

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/fo...Ketchup-109037


Medical Issues, Food Storage and Special Needs:

Some material on this subject:

Storing medications:http://sharonastyk.com/2008/03/25/storing-medicines-
and-other-options/

Food storage for the elderly and medically
fragile:http://sharonastyk.com/2008/03/26/fo...r-elderly-and-
medically-fragile-people/

Food storage with infants and pregnant women:
http://sharonastyk.com/2008/03/25/fo...regnant-women-
infants-and-young-children/

Ok, so what are you concerned about? Special diets? Medications?

Medication for those with chronic conditions:

I really recommend people read the medications post I linked to
initially, which covers something of the range of options available
to people dependent on medications.

If you can afford it, you should probably stockpile a reserve. You
will want to contact the pharmaceutical company for its sense of how
long the pressurization will last - most drugs don't actually expire
when companies say - they have every incentive to expire them
quickly, so that they can be replaced with new. However, a few drugs
to lose potency or even develop toxicity after extended storage, so
ask what the issues are with expiration. Generally speaking, things
are fine even 10+ years - slightly diminished potency. Antibiotics
have been used as much as 40 years after production in some cases.
But again, do your research.

One useful alternative are citizen's groups that work with doctors,
pharmaceutical companies and local governments to assure medication
availability - but I alway suggest multiple options - the "belt and
braces" approach.

Will People Take Your Food?

I know we discussed this earlier in the class, but I thought it was
worth bringing up again, since it comes up all the time. In the AIP
class we tend to talk about security issues, but they are relevant to
food storage. My own feeling is that for most of us, common sense is
going to be sufficient.

Any thoughts or worries about this?

http://sharonastyk.com/2009/01/29/wo...ake-your-food-
storage-away-anyway/

Solar Food Dryer:

This is the one I have - it really depends on your climate - in dry
warm places, you can just set things out on screens (covered with
something food safe). This one is designed for humid climates,
where avoiding mold is important:
http://www.manytracks.com/Homesteadi...rFoodDryer.htm

Various Wheat Flours and Differences:

What's the difference between hard white whole wheat flour, hard
red whole wheat flour and just plain whole red wheat flour?

Well, hard wheats are good for bread making - they have a lot of
gluten. Soft wheats are better for pastry making. That said, you
can use either, but if you want to bake bread, you'll probably want
a hard wheat. White vs. Red is a personal preference - I use both -
the red makes a browner, slightly heartier bread, the white (I buy
prairie gold) makes a lighter colored, slightly lighter textured
bread. My guess is whole red wheat without the word "hard" in front
of it is a soft or medium wheat - a medium would be good for both
bread and pastry, a little less gluten than the hard stuff.

> And what is graham flour? Can you use it as you regularly use
flour?

Graham flour is yet another kind of whole wheat flour, made by a
somewhat unusual technique - they seperate out the interior kernel,
and make white flour by grinding it finely, then they take the bran
and germ and grind it much more coarsely - what you get is a
different texture than whole wheat flour, which its creator
(Sylvester Graham inventor of the Graham Cracker) believed was
better for you. You can bake bread with it, but its texture will be
dense - flatbreads, crackers and pastry are easier. I like the
stuff, and because of the seperation of the two parts, it keeps a
little longer than regular whole wheat flour.

Cottage Industry:

http://sharonastyk.com/2009/01/27/fo...tage-industry/

Anyone here have thoughts about how they might use these skills to
make a supplemental income?

Putting It All Together:

1. List 1 full week's worth of menus that you and the people in your
house will eat. Include breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks. The
trick? They have to be things that you can make from storage/root
cellar/home preserved/season extended garden.

2. Sit down and list all the ingredients you'd use. Take a look at
your pantry and see which you have and which you don't and what you
might want to do about that - you could substitute, you could
purchase and store an ingredient, or you could shift your menu.

Some of you may already have done this, but when you are finished,
you are likely to find that you've got a solid backbone for your
food storage - a lot of us eat the same 14 meals all the time ;-).
BTW, they don't all have to be different - if you eat oatmeal or
granola for breakfast every day, that's no problem - it just means
you need a lot of oats or the components of granola.


I hope some of these topics helped. I've joined the "post-food storage group", and should anything interesting come up, I'll share it.

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Old 02-08-2009, 01:28 PM
 
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Thank you for posting all of that!
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Old 02-08-2009, 05:30 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Jyotsna;13150705Sharon's Favorite Homemade Ketchup:

[url
Thanks so much! Especially for the link to the ketchup recipe.

I am going to make some this afternoon, but with frozen instead of canned tomatoes.
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Old 02-10-2009, 03:42 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Aubergine,

Did you make ketchup from that recipe??? I'd be curious to know how it turned out, and also how much volume you got. I still have some ketchup in my food storage, quite a bit actually, but I'd be very interested in making it so I know wht goes into it.

Lemongrass,

You're welcome!

I know this is a bit of a cross post between groups here on MDC, but I was wondering who is blogging about their food storage here? I'm doing so, and would love to have some visitors to my blog (come on in and have a cup of chai!).

My blog is on my siggy!

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Old 02-10-2009, 11:37 AM
 
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I love it! I'm going to shop tomarrow, for a little "Moral Storage". This will definately help me as I stretch every dollar and every morsel of the other things stored!

Thanks!

I read your blog and wanted to gently correct your word usage. It's not moral, but morale. Morale has to do with one's psychological well-being. How "up" your spirits are, so to speak.

Moral, on the other hand, has to do with principles of correct behavior.

The two are quite different. I wasn't speaking of moral food storage.

I was speaking of foods that we can store that can help keep our spirits up - keep us happy.
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Old 02-12-2009, 12:09 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Hi Kari,

I've got the spelling corrected, and the connotation removed about "moral" food storage. Thanks!

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Old 02-12-2009, 02:24 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Check out my new-to-me canning jars (blog is in siggy).

I'm thinking about where I'm going to put all these jars. I live on
a fault line, which is fairly active. Within 100 to 150 miles from here, we are hearing about earthquakes which are getting registered on the earthquake measurement website.

Our kitchen is full of cabinets (wall cabinets) which I could empty and put the jars in. But because I'm living on a fault line, I'm worried I would loose these during a tremor. I also thought about storing them under the cabinet, but wouldn't be able to get all of them in the under cabinet shelves.

Because several of the jars are valuable, I will store those carefully.

Where do you store your canning jars?

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Old 02-12-2009, 02:32 AM
 
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Great score -- 126 canning jars, wow!

I have the book Stocking Up and have used it well for about a decade now. A wonderful reference.

I have been buying a case or two of new jars every year for a few years now. I use the cardboard boxes the jars come in, with strips of cardboard separating each jar from each other to prevent breakage. They stack well about 4 boxes high and fit efficiently in my pantry storage area and I label the outside of the boxes so I know what is in them. As I use the jars, the empties go back into the boxes, ready for next fall.

I plan to be garage saling for more jars this spring and I'll probably just keep using sturdy cardboard boxes and maybe wrap each jar in a cylinder of cardboard before putting it in a case. I tend to do batches of a dozen jars or so at one time anyway, so they will fill a box.
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Old 02-12-2009, 02:49 AM - Thread Starter
 
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These jars came in their original boxes, but they were full of spiders, roaches and more. It was a nasty mess to go through, and I really felt that I didn't want to introduce these creepy crawlies into my own house.

So I tossed the boxes and carried all 126 of the jars home in my van, without boxes. It was the strangest clinking in my van on the way home. I guess I could just get some new boxes to put them in.

I'm looking forward to using Stocking Up. I called my dad to tell him about my great find, and he said he was going to order a Farmer's Almanac (for gardening) for me. I was his canning buddy when he experimented with canning. We did pickling, and we made butter. I have no doubt that he was happy to hear about my new adventure into canning for this summer. Everyone I talk to who has learned canning from a parent, learned it from their mother. I don't know anyone who learned from their father. It's very cool actually.

Jyotsna

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Old 02-22-2009, 02:27 AM
 
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I'm subbing and hoping to see this thread kept alive - I've read through it and learned a lot already! Lots of great info and links contained here, and I think it could become a valuable resource for others looking to store food.

One of my biggest hold-ups with stockpiling is the fear of infestation, mainly by pantry moths, as we've had them in the past. I LOVE the gamma lids - didn't realize such a thing was available! That would make me feel a lot more secure about having large quantities of flour and grains on hand.

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Old 02-22-2009, 04:59 AM
 
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Aubergine,

Did you make ketchup from that recipe??? I'd be curious to know how it turned out, and also how much volume you got. I still have some ketchup in my food storage, quite a bit actually, but I'd be very interested in making it so I know wht goes into it.
!
I did!

I used tomatoes that I stuck in the freezer at the end of the growing season, instead of tinned ones. I cooked them a bit and then decided to triple the recipe based on the amount I had. The proportions were a little off for the flavors. It ended up a little sweet tasting compared to say, Heinz, -- maybe the tomatoes were higher in natural sugars than canned? Or maybe I should use vine-ripened rather than ripened in a cardboard box after the first frost.

But the ketchup is very yummy. I am eating it happily, and so is one of the little boys in my life, but the others say it is too different.

I got about 5 pints.

There is another ketchup recipe posted in the thread on corn syrup here that looks really good. I'll try that one another time.

I need to find one based on pounds of tomatoes rather than cans to really suit my needs, I think!
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Old 02-22-2009, 09:18 PM
 
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Ladies, I just want to encourage you to keep pounding away at gathering your storage, bit by bit, chunk by chunk.

My husband came home recently to announce that his company laid off half of their employees, and the other half (including him) would be receiving a 20% pay cut AND a reduction in hours for at least two months, maybe longer. IF the company stays open. It has dropped my food budget to $125 a month, and we have food allergies to contend with! I can't go to a food pantry and take anything they offer me.

I consider it a huge blessing that I had some food in storage before this happened. I now use my whole grains and my grain mill to make a different porridge every morning for breakfast. If I didn't have that and basic staples like salt, baking soda, some meat and butter in the freezer, I'd be scrambling to afford just enough food to get us by, and we'd likely be eating two meals a day.

Keep plugging along! It's worth the effort!

KerryAnn @ CookingTF dot com - Nutrient dense foods your kids will LOVE!  Real Food Cooking School and Lactofermentation Classes now live! Use coupon code "CTF" for 20% off.

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Old 02-23-2009, 07:21 PM
 
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s, krankedyann I am glad that you have found some security on this path...hope your family finds general financial security again soon.


Question: How long do you have to freeze grains/flour for and at what temp range?

There is a sale on the flour I usually buy and we are having a cold snap this week (between 20 and minus 10 F.) Can I just buy a bunch and put it in a rubbermaid in my back yard for a few days and consider any bugs done for?
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Old 02-24-2009, 03:11 PM
 
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Hi Guys! I'm in. My DH recently told me this is something he wants up to do. I was kinda overwhelmed at first, but just trying to take it one thing at a time. I don't know many people here yet, since I just moved here, but I found out last week that our pastor's wife, whom I am getting very close to, also has plans to do some major storing up. Neither one of us was brave enough to tell the other at first, though, for fear of being thought "crazy"!! LOL.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jyotsna View Post
KariM,

Can you tell me how you can your soups? I often make a double batch of soup, and freeze half. I'd like to can half instead, and see how it turns out. Can you give me some links on canning soup, or is it basically just like canning veggies??

Thanks. I'm interested in canning everything I can. LOL
Jyotsna, since I didn't see an answer to your question, I though I'd answer it. You MUST process (either by hot water bath, or pressure canning) whatever soup you make according to the ingredient with the LONGEST time (as if you were canning that ingredient separately) . For example, meat takes the longest. So, if you are canning chili - go with the time for beef, not the tomatoes, onions, or anything else. Hope that makes sense.

I've canned a LOT of soups, seasoned beans, condensed soups (like cream of mushroom, cream of potato, cream of celery), chili, etc before and had really, really good success. I'd be glad to share recipes with anyone who wants them. I'm growing a huge garden this year, and will be canning tons of stuff, as well as turning it into the above pre-made things (thinking of power outages/shortages - it takes while to cook dried beans, but just a few min. to heat them up, or even could be eaten cold).

I'd also really like to get a supply of things like Bragg's Liquid Aminos, Worcestershire sauce, vinegars (balsamic is my fav!), even hot sauce, etc. which would really help with turning bland foods into something that actually tastes like things used to. Makes me sad to think of it.

Anyway, just full of ideas

Wife, 27, to DH, 33, and Mama to DS1 Josiah - 8/09, DS2 James - 3/11, 10 angel babies, 3 foster children, and one adorable ALMOST ADOPTED son - 5/05 

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Old 02-25-2009, 02:08 AM - Thread Starter
 
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JoyFamMama,

Thanks for the information. I'll have to can some leftover soups soon, just to see.

I'm excited to be moving into my third month of bulk buying. I stopped by the place where I was going to get some buckets, and they had just tossed them out yesterday! They had saved 60 buckets and lids! So, they have my name and they will be saving about 10 for me over the next few days, then they will call me.

I had thought about how many people could have gotten buckets if only they hadn't tossed them.

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Old 02-25-2009, 02:16 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Okay, for March, I've got two challenges for you!

1. Begin gathering seeds if you haven't already. Let us know what seeds you have, and which seeds you need. What are your gardening plans for this spring? Can you do spring gardening where you live? What's the planting date in your area for your very first spring plantings?

2. Second bulk storage purchase. Time to purchase your second bulk item for your storage. Do you eat rice? Do you have enough for the next 2 to 3 months? Or do you enjoy baking? If so, do you know where to buy wheat? Either way, scope out the place where you will buy your next bulk purchase. I'm focusing on wheat in March. Also cans of tomatoes, since we use SO MANY of them.

Okay, so you have some storage containers, you're planning your next bulk purchase, and you are well on your way to completing your next food storage challenge. If you see other things you need, and you have the extra money, why not go ahead and buy another bulk item? For those with limited income, you will want to just focus on ONE bulk item at a time.

I'd love to hear your thoughts!

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Old 02-25-2009, 02:55 AM - Thread Starter
 
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http://www.mothering.com/discussions....php?t=1044294

AmyAmanda started a good thread, which asks many great questions. I suggest you check it out and try to answer some of the questions.

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Old 02-27-2009, 07:40 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I have found the cutest granny, who has a series of videos demonstrating her "depression cooking". http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P4IjNV3lZkQ

I just watched the fig cookie video, and I have got to make those. They look so delicious. Only thing is that I would use butter instead of lard.

I've watched almost all of the videos this afternoon, and I wish I had a Grandma Clara at my house.

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Old 03-01-2009, 12:56 PM
 
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We just had her peppers and eggs for breakfast this morning. Yum, Yum! She's so adorable. Thanks for sharing, Jyotsna

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Old 03-01-2009, 02:52 PM
 
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THanks for the link to the depression cooking, Jyotsna. I only have one day this week on computer, but I have GOT to find the time to sit down and watch those!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jyotsna View Post
Okay, for March, I've got two challenges for you!

1. Begin gathering seeds if you haven't already. Let us know what seeds you have, and which seeds you need. What are your gardening plans for this spring? Can you do spring gardening where you live? What's the planting date in your area for your very first spring plantings?
Our last frost date here is the third week of May -- though I have a spot next to our house on the south side that is very sheltered and will grow spinach, etc in April, usually. It is too early here to even plant seedlings indoors, yet!

My gardening task right now is to get out some pieces of black tarp that I cut to fit my gardening beds and anchor them over the beds. I have a theory that I can thaw the ground faster. I also have a plan for making a cold frame out of cardboard, tinfoil and plastic that I have on hand and will see what I can do about getting some greens going. (If you Google "cardboard cold frame" you get lots of ideas for improvising one - too many to list.)

It is definitly time to plan the garden, though. I have bought seeds and have some left from last year. I bought heritage varieties because I want to save seeds from more plants this year. My sister and her dh have a greenhouse built onto their garage and they grow seedlings for me. I have to make a list of what we want and find out what supplies (pots/potting soil) they will need from me for this
.[/COLOR]


2. Second bulk storage purchase. Time to purchase your second bulk item for your storage. Do you eat rice? Do you have enough for the next 2 to 3 months? Or do you enjoy baking? If so, do you know where to buy wheat? Either way, scope out the place where you will buy your next bulk purchase. I'm focusing on wheat in March. Also cans of tomatoes, since we use SO MANY of them.

I would love to try buying and grinding grains for breadmaking, but am not there right now.

I am researching water storage containers and water purifiers. I am looking for something that will work for camping and also for home emergency storage. We do have a little on hand and I'm reusing containers for water, but a lot of irregular-sized containers don't stack easily and make poor use of limited storage space, ykwim?

What I've been concentrating on is buying 1 or 2 extras of non-perishable or slow-perishing products we usually use on regular shopping trips to have an inventory on hand. We have extras on hand of our favorite kinds of salsa, hard cheese, brown rice, flour, sugars, honey, cereal, butter, lard, taco chips, raisins, apples....

The one thing I have bought for true food storage purposes that I wouldn't otherwise use is shelf-stable milk, both soymilk in tetrapacks and canned evaporated milk. I do use a little of this rarely for the kids when we travel or go camping, but usually I have to pay close attention to expiry dates and make sure it is rotated properly.

My dh and I have been using dried mint and chamomile and other herbs from our garden last year more often instead of coffee and tea that we can't grow ourselves - and enjoying it!

Spring is egg season. The farmers markets here have a glut of eggs in spring and it is the only time we can get them at the market at a price that rivals supermarket eggs. I know there are ways other than refrigeration to preserve eggs. Something about waxing the shells or a brine solution?
Here is a link that looks useful. Maybe this is the year I will experiment with that.
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