Vintage cast iron vs modern - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 6 Old 01-28-2013, 01:38 PM - Thread Starter
 
Keekasqueek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 11
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Can someone tell me why vintage cast iron is so sought after and a little bit more expensive than the newer stuff? Is it made better/different or is it the nostalgia? Do you notice a difference between vintage and new cast iron? What do you think the best brand is of the newer cast iron? Which are made in USA? Thank you so much! I have 2 pieces that belonged to my dh's grandma (griswold) and am looking to add to them. 

Keekasqueek is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#2 of 6 Old 01-31-2013, 05:25 PM
 
pek64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 2,500
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
One reason might be that it is well seasoned.
pek64 is offline  
#3 of 6 Old 02-04-2013, 10:25 PM
 
Oread's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 171
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)

Maybe I haven't seasoned them well enough, but I have absolutely HATED the new Lodge cast iron pans I have bought. Seriously everything sticks to them. I seasoned them repeatedly, and it didn't matter how much oil I used when was cooking, I couldn't even fry a piece of meat in one without about half of it becoming stuck to the pan, then it was impossible to clean of later since they shouldn't be soaked. 

 

I looked at some of the expensive vintage ones the other day in person, and OMG the insides are soooooo smooth. Smooth enough even to cook an egg in (I tried once in my Lodge, and there wasn't a single bite of egg that could be eaten out of it afterward, ever bit was stuck to the pan) Maybe it is just that they have been used for so many years that any roughness has been worn down, but from what I have read they are also manufactured differently now (basically to be profitable, instead of good quality, like most other things)

Oread is offline  
#4 of 6 Old 02-04-2013, 10:31 PM
 
Viola's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Nevada
Posts: 22,544
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)

I bought some cast iron pans at a church rummage sale, and one of them was so smooth, I figured it had some weird coating on it.  Apparently it was just really well seasoned, and at some point, I ruined the seasoning, but it's still the best pan I have.  The one I bought myself over 10 years ago, a Lodge, has never had a good seasoning.  I am just not good at it, I guess.  Everything sticks to my pans, I guess I don't know how to cook in them. smile.gif

Viola is offline  
#5 of 6 Old 02-05-2013, 05:17 AM
 
swd12422's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 2,111
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Viola View Post

I bought some cast iron pans at a church rummage sale, and one of them was so smooth, I figured it had some weird coating on it.  Apparently it was just really well seasoned, and at some point, I ruined the seasoning, but it's still the best pan I have.  The one I bought myself over 10 years ago, a Lodge, has never had a good seasoning.  I am just not good at it, I guess.  Everything sticks to my pans, I guess I don't know how to cook in them. smile.gif

I have the same issue. Even the pans I have from my great-grandmother that are so smooth aren't completely non-stick like some people say they should be. But I love them anyway.

swd12422 is offline  
#6 of 6 Old 02-07-2013, 11:35 AM
 
mumkimum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Ohio-land
Posts: 2,863
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Older pans are heavier for sure, and in reading about the differences myself once - they were 'machined' on the inside making them much smoother than you see most today (I take that to mean worked at by hand somehow, filed or worked at to get a smoother surface).  

I'd suspect the quality of the iron used used to be better too (or just that using more of it - so that they're heavier helped ensure a better quality pan).

 

Some newer ones are not so bad - but others are obviously not as good as others.  I usually just gauge how 'good' a pan is by looking and feeling it.  I do have some older (but still newer) le creuset frying pans that are uncoated on the inside and they're almost as smooth as other vintage all-cast-iron pieces I've got.  All my best cast iron has been obtained second hand, though.      

mumkimum is offline  
Reply

Tags
Mindful Home

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off