radical homemaker thread? - Mothering Forums
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 30 Old 10-18-2013, 06:27 PM - Thread Starter
 
jessaroo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Albuquerque
Posts: 419
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Hello,

 

I am reading Shannon Hayes book Radical Homemaking and thought we could start a thread here about the ways we embrace radical homemaking and share ways we could support each other.  If there is interest I will elaborate more about the things we are doing at our house, the struggles, and our dreams.

 

Looking forward to connecting with others.

jessaroo is offline  
#2 of 30 Old 10-19-2013, 04:32 PM
 
lauren's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: In a state of grace
Posts: 6,784
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)

I am here to give your thread a gentle bump and get it some attention!! Sounds like a cool book!


 
lauren is online now  
#3 of 30 Old 10-24-2013, 08:49 AM
 
SoapMama12's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Outside Philadelphia
Posts: 11
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I only have a minute right now, but wanted to respond. I love Shannon Hayes! I read Radical Homemaker a few years ago and found it fascinating and inspiring. I would love to hear from others embracing that kind of lifestyle.


Mama of DDbabyf.gifand wife to DH geek.gif . Trying to homestead in the suburbs chicken3.gif.
SoapMama12 is offline  
#4 of 30 Old 12-01-2013, 07:05 PM
 
triana1326's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Winthrop, Maine
Posts: 910
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Time to dig out my copy and re-read it. I remember reading it the first time and being so invigorated about what I was doing in my life as a stay at home mother of two wee ones (not so wee now!!). I think it'll be next on my reading list...now to muddle through my current book! I'll be back!!


hippie.gifWife to blowkiss.gifJames , treehugger.gifMama to Saraenergy.gif and Robbie bouncy.gif
knit.gifread.gifgeek.gifgd.gifh20homebirth.giffamilybed2.gif  398/2013, 2/200, 4/52

triana1326 is offline  
#5 of 30 Old 12-07-2013, 04:52 PM
 
mommariffic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: the rolling hills, New Jersey
Posts: 1,794
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Love love love that book, although I'm far from being a "radical homemaker" I am trying! 

 

My goals are this - to raise my own meat/fiber animals, chickens for eggs, to grow most of our own heirloom veggies, to start sewing more and to live a bit more simply. 

 

What we are doing - unschooling, raising some animals (goats, a duck, rabbits)..and we had a small garden last year, which will hopefully grow larger! 


blogging.jpg    fambedsingle2.gif  homebirth.jpg  read.gif  happy momma to DD 8/07 and DS 6/10
mommariffic is offline  
#6 of 30 Old 12-20-2013, 03:25 PM
 
RebeloveMa's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Golden, CO
Posts: 58
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Can't stay for long but wanted to throw in a quick "I'm in!" I just bought the book. I have wanted to read it, so now is the time. We are in an apartment right now, but I am radicalizing my homemaking everyday. I'll start with this tidbit: I just busted out the old sewing machine my mom gave me a year ago. Plan: upcycle the clothes I have, make some stuff for around the house, experiment with some ideas for my bestie's upcoming summer wedding. I am all about low-budget no-budget solutions. I am becoming more and more intolerant of the throw-it-away-and-buy-some-more culture we live in. More later... Glad to have found this thread. :thumb


Its my super DH superhero.gif, my lovely DD jog.gif(11/15/11), ferocious Future Cat, and myself read.gif

 

familybed1.gif

RebeloveMa is offline  
#7 of 30 Old 12-22-2013, 09:33 PM
 
Fortune Teller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 151
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)

Just throwing my interest in here!  

 

Quitting my job this summer, becoming a full-time homemaker and homeschooling mama.  Using the 8 months of employment I have left to prepare for it all (paying off debt, etc).

 

I'm reading and researching everything I can in the meantime.  Goals include having a year-around garden (as opposed to just summer), canning, making my own soap and lip balm (our family goes through Burt's Bees like nothing else!  Figured I should learn how to make it at home for pennies), homeschooling, and just making our house a home that is well tended and comfortable for my family.  I'd like to throw chickens in the mix soon.

Fortune Teller is offline  
#8 of 30 Old 12-23-2013, 04:27 AM
 
Greenmama13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 163
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Fortune teller - I would love to hear how you make your own lipbalm.  Thanks.


Mama to 8 yo ds and 4 yo dd.treehugger.gifhomeschool.gifjumpers.gifbellyhair.gif
Greenmama13 is offline  
#9 of 30 Old 12-23-2013, 09:46 AM
 
SoapMama12's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Outside Philadelphia
Posts: 11
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

It is nice to see this thread still going.

 

A little bit about myself... I quit teaching to become a part-time nanny and be able to bring my daughter to work and spend more time homesteading. Then in May I left working outside of the home completely to be a ft SAHM. We live in the suburbs with 4 ducks and 4 chickens. We also raised 25 broilers this year. We try to cook everything from scratch and make the most of what we have. We have a veggie garden and make our own soap, lotions and such, brew beer. I need to work on my sewing skills.

 

Our goal now is to put our house up for sale by February and move to a place with more land. We would really like to raise all of our meat and have a cow or goats for dairy.


Mama of DDbabyf.gifand wife to DH geek.gif . Trying to homestead in the suburbs chicken3.gif.
SoapMama12 is offline  
#10 of 30 Old 12-23-2013, 08:35 PM
 
Fortune Teller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 151
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greenmama13 View Post
 

Fortune teller - I would love to hear how you make your own lipbalm.  Thanks.

Haven't made it yet, but when I do I will let you know how it goes!  Right now I don't have time for ANYTHING besides work, so it will have to wait until I quit my job.  

Fortune Teller is offline  
#11 of 30 Old 12-23-2013, 09:56 PM
 
bruna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 248
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Subscribing for now, and looking forward to chiming in when I get the chance...smile.gif

familybed1.gifbftoddler.gif homebirth.jpgcd.gif  kid.gif 
bruna is offline  
#12 of 30 Old 12-24-2013, 07:07 AM
 
mamabear0314's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,260
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)

I have read it several times and always love it. Before now I read it as a sahm and army wife...next time I read it I will be reading it as a single mom of 3 kids and student...I'm going to school for accounting so I should be able to work from home and still be a homemaker..


Single, student mama slingboy.gif to 3 boys jumpers.gif 

 

homeschool.gif saynovax.gif signcirc1.gif bfinfant.gif femalesling.GIF familybed2.gif h20homebirth.gif 

mamabear0314 is offline  
#13 of 30 Old 12-24-2013, 01:41 PM
 
RebeloveMa's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Golden, CO
Posts: 58
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote: from SoapMama12
 A little bit about myself... I quit teaching to become a part-time nanny and be able to bring my daughter to work and spend more time homesteading. Then in May I left working outside of the home completely to be a ft SAHM. We live in the suburbs with 4 ducks and 4 chickens. We also raised 25 broilers this year. We try to cook everything from scratch and make the most of what we have. We have a veggie garden and make our own soap, lotions and such, brew beer. I need to work on my sewing skills.

Right on! I have never had chickens (that may become obvious after I ask my questions), but would love to have them for eggs and to eat. I am curious about you raising broilers. Did you raise them all at once to sell, or on an ongoing basis because you were eating them yourself, or something else? I was recently considering exactly how I would go about raising chickens if I wanted to process one or two a month, but I don't really know enough about it to get a mental picture. How much space do you use for your chickens? Do you process them yourself? I don't know what kind of suburb you live in, but if it is anything like the ones around me, it makes me grin to picture someone processing chickens in their backyard with curious neighbors peeking over the fence. :)

 

I will tell a bit about myself as well. I am a part-time teacher at a community college. My husband is in school and works part-time as well. We have always considered our time more important than money, so even before we had our dd, we were living a minimalist lifestyle, or getting closer to it. As I pursue this way of living, I move more and more into a radical direction. It wasn't about homesteading for me at first. I have had counter-culture leanings since I can remember, but they have traditionally been in direct conflict with consumerism. It seems quite natural in retrospect that I would gravitate toward radical homemaking, especially after becoming a mother. I agree with Shannon Hayes that radical homemaking puts you in the vanguard of social change.

 

My try with radical homemaking: We do not have any land right now, or even a house. In fact we are looking to move this summer. However, I help my friend's mom keep a garden in her backyard. I make most of our food from scratch, though I have plenty of room to grow! I am currently teaching myself to sew. I have been an anti-consumer for a long time now, though I find that there is always more ways to unplug. I am pretty good at finding low-budget (sometimes even no-budget) solutions to things we need or want around the house. I usually upcycle and repurpose rather than getting rid of things or get new things. I want to increase my skills and accomplishments in all of these areas. I also really like the community emphasis in Hayes's book. I am interested in building a network of others with similar goals to my own (I am glad to be a part of this thread), and getting to know my neighbors, even if they aren't radical home makers! I look forward to hearing more stories and sharing ideas and methods.

Happy Holidays!


Its my super DH superhero.gif, my lovely DD jog.gif(11/15/11), ferocious Future Cat, and myself read.gif

 

familybed1.gif

RebeloveMa is offline  
#14 of 30 Old 12-25-2013, 10:28 AM
 
kitchensqueen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Elk Grove Village, IL
Posts: 3,254
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 35 Post(s)

Count me in - I read it awhile back and it really resonated with me. I've got a traditional job, but I do a lot of DIY in other areas. I'll be back to elaborate later (enjoying a little Christmas Day down time while Little Man takes his nap currently). 


Apartment Farm - the chronicles of my cooking, gardening, crafting and other such things. 

 

kitchensqueen is offline  
#15 of 30 Old 12-26-2013, 04:53 AM
 
SoapMama12's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Outside Philadelphia
Posts: 11
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by RebeloveMa View Post
 

Right on! I have never had chickens (that may become obvious after I ask my questions), but would love to have them for eggs and to eat. I am curious about you raising broilers. Did you raise them all at once to sell, or on an ongoing basis because you were eating them yourself, or something else? I was recently considering exactly how I would go about raising chickens if I wanted to process one or two a month, but I don't really know enough about it to get a mental picture. How much space do you use for your chickens? Do you process them yourself? I don't know what kind of suburb you live in, but if it is anything like the ones around me, it makes me grin to picture someone processing chickens in their backyard with curious neighbors peeking over the fence. :)

We have about 1/3 of an acre although when you minus the house, garage, front yard and driveway it's much less. This was our first year raising broilers. We got a batch of 10 freedom rangers in the spring and then a batch of 15 late summer. My husband built a sturdy pen with a covering for them to stay in at night or when we weren't home. We also built a lightweight mobile pen but we ended up not really using it that much. Since I am home most of the time I would just let them free range. On one side our neighbor has a fence up and the other side is a hedge and garage so we filled in the gaps and front with rabbit fencing, which seemed to do the trick.

 

We processed them in one day and then froze them for personal use. Our neighbors knew we were processing and even though we extended an invitation, no one showed up. But I kinda expected that.

 

One bit of wisdom I learned..... Be careful if you buy feed with fish meal. We went organic both times but decided for the second batch to go soy-free as well. Most feeds then use fish meal as the protein. I can't speak for all brands but with the one we used, all of our chickens now have a fishy flavor :(. A friend of ours raised a batch at the same time and ran out of broiler feed for their last week and fed them layer instead. She said they are significantly less fishy, so finishing them on something else might help too.


Mama of DDbabyf.gifand wife to DH geek.gif . Trying to homestead in the suburbs chicken3.gif.
SoapMama12 is offline  
#16 of 30 Old 12-26-2013, 05:01 AM
 
SoapMama12's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Outside Philadelphia
Posts: 11
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greenmama13 View Post
 

Fortune teller - I would love to hear how you make your own lipbalm.  Thanks.

 

The recipe I use is pretty easy. You can use it as a lotion bar too. Equal parts by weight: cocoa butter, beeswax, and sunflower oil. Melt, mix, add EO, and pour into lip balm tubes or a container. You can add whatever EO you want. I usually do peppermint or orange. If you want it to be more glossy or shiny use coconut oil or olive oil instead.


Mama of DDbabyf.gifand wife to DH geek.gif . Trying to homestead in the suburbs chicken3.gif.
SoapMama12 is offline  
#17 of 30 Old 12-30-2013, 07:32 AM
 
RebeloveMa's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Golden, CO
Posts: 58
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

@ SoapMama12

Thank you for the chicken info. That is crazy about the fishy feed! Good to know. I will probably start with a few hens for eggs, but it is nice to know you were able to raise so many chickens on a relatively small amount of land.

 

I thought I would share some of my homemaking projects for the new year. I have a big list, but here are:

 

My Top Five Homemaking Projects to Kick Off 2014

 

  1. Make a worm compost bin. I have wanted to do this for a while. I do not have a yard for a compost pile, but I can accommodate a worm bin for food scraps.
  2. Make a sourdough starter. My friend had one going for a long time and I just never made one for myself. I guess I have been a little intimidated about making bread, and I go through bouts of being grain free. But now is the time.
  3. Crochet a denim rug. I found great ideas on line. I was wondering what to do about our old jeans.
  4. Sew reusable "paper" towels. I saw this on line and thought it was a good idea.
  5. Make some homemade yogurt. I really want to try this recipe because you don't need to heat it up and keep at a consistent temp. I get raw milk from a local goat guy (cow in the winter), so I think it will be tasty. Plus, once I have the yogurt I can make cream cheese and whey. Then I can do some more lacto-fermentation. I have only fermented ginger before with this method.

 

What projects are you working on?

KatelynRose likes this.

Its my super DH superhero.gif, my lovely DD jog.gif(11/15/11), ferocious Future Cat, and myself read.gif

 

familybed1.gif

RebeloveMa is offline  
#18 of 30 Old 12-30-2013, 08:18 AM
 
SweetSilver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Westfarthing
Posts: 4,987
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)

:lurkI couldn't make it through the book.  Not that I didn't love the beginning, the ideas and the cool moniker (Carla Emery had the right idea, but not the cool name).  But I started reading when the girls were little, got the gist and didn't have the patience to read all the anecdotes.  I didn't need to be convinced.  That's my disclaimer.

 

Still, the lifestyle has been a dream of mine for a long time.  Subbing to hear your ideas.  I'm back to making my own bread after a long hiatus.  I gave up because it was inevitable that the shit would hit the fan right in the middle of it (yeah, yeah, kids helping and blah blah blah).

 

Thanks for the yogurt link.  I have had trouble with yogurt.  I want non-homogenized, but I can't have raw dairy.  I have tried and tried to acclimate myself to it, but the fist twisting my gut for a week ended those experiments, and I have attempted it several times with several different milks.  I think the heat from pasteurization destroys some of the proteins or something else and that allows me to tolerate it, or there is a bacteria present (in larger quantities in milk than cream?) that my gut violently rejects.  Anyhow, the yogurt I make has a curdled texture.  Too hot?  Still figuring it out.  I will keep on the lookout for room-temp starters.  Someone gave me kefir grains, but the result smelled *bad*, not pleasantly sour.  Chickens loooooved it-- went absolutely bonkers for it, but sorry gals, I am not going to keep buying milk for your sake.  I do not love you that much.

 

Sipping on rose hip tea this morning.  Just from the coop, but I'm inspired to find the right patch away from herbicides (they do love to grow in the hedge rows of the hayfields) and ask to harvest my own next fall.


Give me a few minutes while I caffeinate.
SweetSilver is offline  
#19 of 30 Old 01-19-2014, 08:38 AM
 
RebeloveMa's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Golden, CO
Posts: 58
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Hi there! I was wondering how everyone is doing with there radical homemaking. 

 

After finishing Radical Homemaker, I read Saved. Shannon Hayes recommends it on her website. I was interesting and inspiring in many ways. I also picked up some books on urban/suburban homesteading. I am inspired to grow a bunch of my own food even though I have no ground to grow it in. I finished my worm bin and just need to get some red worms from a friend of mine. I will have to grow in containers. My problem is the expense. I can go cheap on the actual containers and seeds, but the good dirt is what worries me. Containers need good clean disease-free soil, and even the penny-pincher homesteaders I have read recommend buying the best organic soil you can afford. Any thoughts??

 

Anyway, I am plugging along with my transition from a unit of consumption to one of production.


Its my super DH superhero.gif, my lovely DD jog.gif(11/15/11), ferocious Future Cat, and myself read.gif

 

familybed1.gif

RebeloveMa is offline  
#20 of 30 Old 01-29-2014, 03:17 PM
 
invierna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Bend, Oregon
Posts: 34
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)

I feel funny about calling myself a "radical homemaker," but here I am. Hayes' book made sense both to me and of me..."oh, so that's what I'm doing..." Glad to come across this thread.

 

@RebeloveMa, what you read is true. Don't skimp on the soil! Unless your soil is healthy, you are only practicing, and once your soil is healthy, you are a great gardener! :)

 

In my experience, as a lifelong gardener in lots of different  situations, the best way to go is a landscape materials supply company that makes its own mixes and buy a yard, or yards, at a time. Get a container mix that's engineered for drainage. Around here, a yard (envision a cube 3' x 3' x 3', or the bed of a small pickup truck) of container mix costs about $35 if we go get it...they load it into the truck or whatever container you bring with a tractor. I would only pay for delivery if I was going big, like re-landscaping a whole parcel or starting a nursery operation or something. Anyway, if that seems expensive, compare the volume (27 cu ft) to bagged mixes from the Big Box (2 cu ft for $8?). Call around and look for coupons. With spring on the way there will be specials. And if you need help figuring out how much soil to get, I can help with calculations.

 

@SweetSilver, I want to get back into baking bread, too. Not that I was ever awesome at it or very dedicated, but I did make it here and there. I can't seem to muster the courage, or inspiration, in the last year or so...did you get any made since you posted? What kind?

RebeloveMa likes this.
invierna is offline  
#21 of 30 Old 03-02-2014, 10:09 PM
 
KatelynRose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Northern Oregon
Posts: 298
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Great thread! I haven't read the book, but I'm all for the radical homemaking lifestyle. We just moved from central Texas to a house in Northern Oregon where we are able to have a garden and chickens, so I look forward to producing some of our own food. We need to get an almanac for this area, we aren't used to it in the Pacific Northwest.ive been looking up good egg laying, cold hardy chickens as well. I'd like to get them soon so they'll grow up and we can start producing eggs.
I just came into possession of my very own sewing machine, so I too am just now advancing/educating myself at that.. I've made all of our curtains and spiffed up some of our clothes, but I'm really interested in quilting.
DH has been invited to go fishing and hunting here, with our friendly landlord (whose family lives on 23 acres, self-sustainably).. So hopefully we will see some free natural meat on the table soon! We are so lucky we found this place, it's making our dreams of natural living ("radical homemaking") come true..
We'd really like to purchase land south of here so we can go all out: growing all our own food, raising chickens, a few milk cows, horses for transportation (no emissions), depend on ourselves for energy, water from a well, etc etc.. But we will see. It's a step by step process!!

I just get so frustrated though with my family... I come from a long line of country folk, but somehow along the way .. Right before I was born, really.. They strayed from their origins and started being consumers. So instead of growing up, learning practical life on the farm, I grew up with headphones on- plugged in all the time. I'd be so far ahead in my goals now if only my family had stuck to the basics! Is anyone else living this angst? Haha..
Another annoying bit is that they own 200 acres in Texas of land that could easy be used to sustain oneself.. Plus a good number of other families.. But they don't use it for anything, yet they don't let anyone live on it. It makes no sense! Sorry, haven't had anywhere to vent about that one.. smile.gif I'm happy to be in Oregon, though.. The land here is much more fertile..

In case you're curious about my status: I'm Kate, I spend every miraculous day with my darling soul mate JB and we are expecting our first baby (boy!) ...
KatelynRose is online now  
#22 of 30 Old 03-18-2014, 06:59 AM
 
KatelynRose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Northern Oregon
Posts: 298
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
@rebelovema: thanks for the link to the reusable paper towels, and the yogurt! I've been on the hunt for local raw milk that I can buy around here, so I can start making my own dairy products and we can enjoy raw milk. Right now we are drinking the store bought milk from grass fed cows, but I know pasteurized is just not the same. Good job chugging along though! You're ahead of me on this journey from consumption to production.

Has anyone here seen the short YouTube video, "The Story of Stuff"? That little video was enough to make me put the big brake pedals on when it comes to creating trash. Our system is designed to produce stuff that is inherently obsolescent so we are forced to trash it and buy more stuff.. Quite ridiculous. Our planet cannot handle the pollution. We've got to clean things up! So one of my major obsessions these days is trying to create a no-trash-household even while we rent here.. right now we need to build a compost bin.. Hmm, here's my list:
my top five homemaking projects to kick off 2014:
1. Create a compost bin (what is a worm composter? I'm intrigued! I'm trying to decide what we need to build that is most efficient but also cheap... We have huge earthworms in our yard already..)
2. Stop using all disposable items; come up with reusable versions instead.
3. Improve sewing skills; learn to crochet
4. Grow a small vegetable and herb garden (Need to prepare for this soon! Spring is coming! We need to collect some good dirt for our little garden area as well, I know that will be over half the expense of starting our garden.. Thanks @Invierna for the tips about soil)
5. Raise a couple of chickens, australorps or Wyandottes, here so they are grass n bug fed and we can get some of our own eggs to supplement what we are forced to buy from the store. I like eggs from cage free, pasture raised chickens so I've gotta create my own because our landlords chickens can't keep up with our egg needs haha he sells us eggs but we go through them pretty quick. I know just having two or three won't cover our needs but at least we will get experience and a few extra eggs.

Right now we're trying to gain experience dabbling in all things sustainable, so that soon we can make a bigger leap toward a sustainable homestead. wink1.gif

In case you're curious about my status: I'm Kate, I spend every miraculous day with my darling soul mate JB and we are expecting our first baby (boy!) ...
KatelynRose is online now  
#23 of 30 Old 03-18-2014, 05:48 PM
 
kitchensqueen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Elk Grove Village, IL
Posts: 3,254
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 35 Post(s)

Okay, I'm finally back! Now that the holidays are over I have time to think again. Some of the stuff we do - 

 

- Make my own soy candles. 

- Bake bread and other baked goods. 

- Vegetable garden every year. 

- I do a bit of sewing, knitting and crochet. As well as embroidery, but that's more decorative. 

- Cook from scratch as much as possible. 

- Brew some of our own beer. 

 

My list of things that I'd like to do is huge - I'll have to come back and answer that part later. :-)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by KatelynRose View Post

1. Create a compost bin (what is a worm composter? I'm intrigued! I'm trying to decide what we need to build that is most efficient but also cheap... We have huge earthworms in our yard already..)

 

Worm bins are great ways to compost for apartment dwellers. Red worms turn green matter into worm casings, which is a great form of compost. You can make a DIY worm bin from a Rubbermaid container that will fit under the kitchen sink. I don't have one, but it's on my list of things to do as well. 


Apartment Farm - the chronicles of my cooking, gardening, crafting and other such things. 

 

kitchensqueen is offline  
#24 of 30 Old 03-19-2014, 10:11 AM
 
orangemomma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: East Coast United States
Posts: 309
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)

Subbing. I really do like her book but it does make me feel guilty about how little I am producing right now.  I work outside of the home - a LOT of hours per week. However, I do work in healthcare for a non-profit, so that's something.

The things that we are currently doing include: my partner stays home (mostly) to take care of our toddler, we try to fix things instead of replacing them (think appliances), we participate in an organic local CSA during the summer months for our fruits and veggies,we make our own bread and pizza dough, we cloth diaper, hang our clothes to dry, sometimes we cut our own cord wood.

 

Some things that I would like to try are: gardening again (we had one but gave it up - it seemed to be too much work), canning the veggies from the CSA, learn how to use my sewing machine, learn more about re-purposing various objects we have around the house, making my own cleaning supplies.


 Breastfeeding, babywearing, homeschooling momma to two. 181/2014 items in decluttering challenge (643 items gone last year 2013, 625 gone in 2012)
orangemomma is online now  
#25 of 30 Old 03-21-2014, 11:18 AM
 
KatelynRose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Northern Oregon
Posts: 298
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchensqueen View Post
 

Okay, I'm finally back! Now that the holidays are over I have time to think again. Some of the stuff we do - 

 

- Make my own soy candles. 

- Bake bread and other baked goods. 

- Vegetable garden every year. 

- I do a bit of sewing, knitting and crochet. As well as embroidery, but that's more decorative. 

- Cook from scratch as much as possible. 

- Brew some of our own beer. 

 

Worm bins are great ways to compost for apartment dwellers. Red worms turn green matter into worm casings, which is a great form of compost. You can make a DIY worm bin from a Rubbermaid container that will fit under the kitchen sink. I don't have one, but it's on my list of things to do as well. 

 

Oh, neato! You do a lot of things I'm very interested in learning how to do.. I'd really like to learn to make candles.. I had been thinking beeswax, but I hadn't looked it up yet. What type of breads do you bake? We are addicted to this expensive seed bread that we get at the health food store, but if I could learn to make breads then eventually I could make something like that I think ;) 

We also cook from scratch as much as possible, and we stick to mainly "traditional" foods.  Within the next two months we will have a few chickens and a small garden going. 

I have yet to get my sewing machine set up here, but I already have a long list of projects: making cleaning rags, curtains, repairing clothing.. And I want to learn to crochet for my own entertainment and enjoyment, it is something my grandmothers did. What types of items do you crochet? I'm just curious :) 

 

Thanks for answering my question! That's awesome!

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by orangemomma View Post
 

Subbing. I really do like her book but it does make me feel guilty about how little I am producing right now.  I work outside of the home - a LOT of hours per week. However, I do work in healthcare for a non-profit, so that's something.

The things that we are currently doing include: my partner stays home (mostly) to take care of our toddler, we try to fix things instead of replacing them (think appliances), we participate in an organic local CSA during the summer months for our fruits and veggies,we make our own bread and pizza dough, we cloth diaper, hang our clothes to dry, sometimes we cut our own cord wood.

 

Some things that I would like to try are: gardening again (we had one but gave it up - it seemed to be too much work), canning the veggies from the CSA, learn how to use my sewing machine, learn more about re-purposing various objects we have around the house, making my own cleaning supplies.

 

I know how you feel (about the guilt), but I just try to keep high expectations for myself and do the best I can! The way our society is set up, it makes it difficult to adopt a more natural, non-consumer lifestyle (sadly). I have felt very lucky since we have moved and I haven't had to work as much, so I have had more time to spend organizing the household. Also not having a child yet definitely gives me more free time.. 

I found a book on Amazon.com a few days ago called "natural cleaning recipes: master the art of natural and organic cleaning" by aubrey azzaro and it was FREE ($0.00) for the Kindle version, so I downloaded it and it has wonderful DIY natural, cheap recipes for household cleaning solutions. Pretty sweet :)


In case you're curious about my status: I'm Kate, I spend every miraculous day with my darling soul mate JB and we are expecting our first baby (boy!) ...
KatelynRose is online now  
#26 of 30 Old 03-21-2014, 05:13 PM
 
kitchensqueen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Elk Grove Village, IL
Posts: 3,254
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 35 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by KatelynRose View Post

 

Oh, neato! You do a lot of things I'm very interested in learning how to do.. I'd really like to learn to make candles.. I had been thinking beeswax, but I hadn't looked it up yet.

 

Soy wax is probably my favorite, and it's super easy to use. You can buy it in a tub of flakes, that melt up really evenly and quickly. It has a nice set and takes scent well. I save nice glass canisters from condiments and such (Better Than Bouillion jars are my favorite - at this point, there's no way that I make enough home made stock to cover our needs so I buy it to supplement). 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by KatelynRose View Post

 

What type of breads do you bake? We are addicted to this expensive seed bread that we get at the health food store, but if I could learn to make breads then eventually I could make something like that I think ;) 

 

Mostly peasant loaves - French and Italian style boules and baguettes. Pain d'epi is probably my favorite (especially with bacon inside). I also like quick breads for when I don't have time to do a yeasted loaf - beer bread is my favorite all purpose one of those. It's so good toasted with hearty winter soups! I've dabbled in dinner rolls (I made pumpkin crescents one year for Thanksgiving that turned out pretty well) but I have yet to really get into soft-type sandwich bread. Most of them call for milk, and we're a dairy-free household, so that one's been a bit of a challenge. 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by KatelynRose View Post
 

What types of items do you crochet? I'm just curious :) 

 

Only the basics, and mostly square things. Potholders and scarves mostly. I'd like to branch out and learn more stitches to expand my skills, but finding the time to do so proves challenging. I also desperately want to learn to knit my own socks. 

 

Is anyone gardening? We've started our first round of seeds for this year - tomatoes, peppers and peas. Many of them have sprouted, so I actually need to get the grow light rigged up on the bookcase so they don't get all leggy. 


Apartment Farm - the chronicles of my cooking, gardening, crafting and other such things. 

 

kitchensqueen is offline  
#27 of 30 Old 03-22-2014, 07:19 AM
 
KatelynRose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Northern Oregon
Posts: 298
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
@Kitchensqueen: it looks like Soy wax is easier to use and cheaper, but I am interested in the health benefits of beeswax. I read it releases negative ions when it burns, which means it can help draw toxins out of the air because many pollutants have a positive charge, so they'd attract. The main reason I want to make candles in the first place is because I worry about toxins in store bought candles, so if I can make a candle that cancels out a few toxins then I'm doing extra well haha ... I just ordered the supplies necessary for making beeswax candles on amazon.. The other thing I like about the idea of beeswax is that I can use the extra I ordered to experiment making lip balm and moisturizer for myself. I'm excited to experiment, I'll let everyone know how it goes. Apparently you have to mix palm oil or coconut oil with it so your candles don't crack, and some people remarked about the odd smell it has... But I'm stoked to try it out. innocent.gif

Hehehe we drink milk but I try to stead clear of flour whenever possible, so bread doesn't fit in well with that tactic either. But I hoped if I learn to make my own breads, then I could make healthier loafs with flours other than white flour, or make sure whatever grains I'm using are sprouted or soaked..? Haven't looked into it enough. But my DH loves bread with cheese for a snack (and so do I, really) so eventually I need to learn how to make my own.. Otherwise I'll be out in the country hoping one of my neighbors makes enough to trade lol.gif

My Nana tried to teach me to crochet when I was very young, but I was too young to pay attention well enough and then keep up with it myself greensad.gif I wish I'd taken more of an interest in it when I were younger- I'd be a crocheting genius by now! Hah.. I've been reading through a learn to crochet book, but I need to get a few supplies so I can start trying to learn. I'll probably check out YouTube to see if there are any good instruction videos posted..

We haven't stared our garden yet, but it's getting to be about time to start! It's still just a bit too cold fir baby plants yet though (we live in NORTH north Oregon) ..but we could start getting the soil ready. treehugger.gif

In case you're curious about my status: I'm Kate, I spend every miraculous day with my darling soul mate JB and we are expecting our first baby (boy!) ...
KatelynRose is online now  
#28 of 30 Old 04-03-2014, 04:17 PM
 
kitchensqueen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Elk Grove Village, IL
Posts: 3,254
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 35 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by KatelynRose View Post

@Kitchensqueen: it looks like Soy wax is easier to use and cheaper, but I am interested in the health benefits of beeswax.

 

That's a good point about the health benefits, but the price is just out of our budget these days. Unless anyone knows of an affordable source to make me change my mind! 


Apartment Farm - the chronicles of my cooking, gardening, crafting and other such things. 

 

kitchensqueen is offline  
#29 of 30 Old 04-10-2014, 02:58 PM
 
RebeloveMa's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Golden, CO
Posts: 58
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Hi all and Happy Spring! How is the radical homemaking these days?

 

@Invierna - Hi! Thank you for the feedback. That is a really good idea about the soil mix from a landscaper. A yard is too much for me, but I could possibly split it with a friend of mine. I have finished my containers, so all that is left is the planting! I am going to look into my options, so thanks again for the ideas!

 

@KatelynRose - Worm bins are a very easy way to compost small amounts of food scraps, create amazing plant food, and keep low-maintenance pets :wink. You can buy worm bins or make your own, like I did. There are a couple of different designs for DIY bins out there. I just use a 10 gallon plastic bin. You need some holes drilled around the top and on the lid for air, and some drainage holes in the bottom (which means you have to have something under your bin to catch the fluids). I filled mine with shredded news paper and dried leaves, and moistened it a bit. Then a friend of mine gave me a bunch of his worms and some of the humus from his bin. Now I have a TON of happy little worms and some harmless mites that are working through the matter in there. The stuff my friend gave me was super wet, so I have been turning the contents regularly with a big wooden spoon to try and bring down the moisture. Otherwise, it is the easiest thing to care for ever! Realistically, you can only compost a fraction of your food waste unless you have multiple bins. However, it is still an awesome way to go and the castings are super. Oh, and most worm folks recommend only using red wigglers, so no night crawlers for your bin.

 

@orangemama - I think CSAs and NSAs are an awesome way to go if you don't have the time or inclination to do the gardening yourself. I am on the fence about one myself; not sure if I'll really need to do it or not...

 

@kitchensqueen - Beer! Yay!

 

Overall, I am still progressing toward radical homemaking values. We are in the process of finding a new rental, which presents many opportunities and challenges. I see it as a radical homemaking practice itself. Do I go for the house with yard? The one closest to the light rail? Or do I stay near the woods where I can more easily access and commune with nature, but where it is more expensive? I am truly torn about these and many other questions. To add, my mom is retiring and want to come live with us. This is great! But with our combined budgets, we still fall short of ideal. The market for rentals is not on our side. Ug.

 

I hope you all are enjoying this season and your homemaking!


Its my super DH superhero.gif, my lovely DD jog.gif(11/15/11), ferocious Future Cat, and myself read.gif

 

familybed1.gif

RebeloveMa is offline  
#30 of 30 Old 04-17-2014, 07:43 PM
 
kitchensqueen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Elk Grove Village, IL
Posts: 3,254
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 35 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by RebeloveMa View Post

 

@kitchensqueen - Beer! Yay!

 

All winter I kept saying I needed to do another brew, and didn't get around to it. I really need to get out gear and get some going! 

 

I did make a supply of home made cleaning ingredients the other day - all purpose spray and laundry soap. Loving the all-purpose spray! Haven't tried the laundry soap yet, but we've got some laundry to do this weekend so I'm excited to try it out. 

 

My seedlings are looking fairly well, and we're registering for our community garden plot on Monday. Fingers crossed that the snow is actually over... 


Apartment Farm - the chronicles of my cooking, gardening, crafting and other such things. 

 

kitchensqueen is offline  
Reply

Tags
Mindful Home

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off