Do you consider your dryer necessary? - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

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Old 05-23-2014, 02:39 AM
 
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I wouldn't normally except....we don't have what I would call normal conditions in our house/climate/etc.

 

I line dry 95% of the clothes we have - but I use a dryer to make sure they are completely DRY before putting them away a lot of the time. Days when it is not just warm but low enough humidity (please don't ask %, I have no way of knowing!) aren't always common or consecutive. Or when clothes haven't had enough time before it started to sprinkle or before dusk and dew arrive - I want to avoid must and mold when the clothes are stored for periods of time in their dressers.

 

We also have an issue in our house where there is a growth of mold that, until it is eradicated, affects the entire house. It isn't noticeable unless the dehumidifier is not running (power outage). That's just the smell. But line drying in the basement during winter is OUT until we can properly address things, as it makes the issue so much more pervasive, AND the two dehumidifiers can't keep up with even a load a day (and really, it's just substituting the dehumidifier for the dryer). Mold is SUCH a health issue I have been learning about these past 8 months, and I won't go into it here, it's such a big thing, but it is so dangerous.

 

So I just keep clothes as dry as I can by touching them up with a dryer. One shirt can easily turn a drawer-full of clothes musty smelling, and it would only have to be a cuff, not even that much.

 

I try not to get too crazy about it, but staying on top of just touching up most line-dried items has saved me headaches.

 

Also want to mention that dryers need to be cleaned INSIDE (not just the filter) of lint that has built up. A dryer fire is no fun for anyone. And SOOT is a pain to have to try to clean from clothes - or anywhere else.

 

And one random mention that - fewer clothes would mean much less incidence of having to line dry in the first place - and less to store with less to get into trouble with must and mold, etc. THAT is a topic for a discussion I would love to have or find, but not here. : )

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Old 05-23-2014, 07:00 AM
 
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If you have a newer washer that uses less water then ditching the dryer becomes easier.  They'll be almost dry to begin with.  If you have an older washer that uses more water and temperamental weather, it's harder.  I rarely use my dryer in the summer and do hang alot of stuff up in the colder months but with kids, I need the dryer in the winter.  You could seriously put the dryer away in the warmer months and bring it back out for the winter if need be.

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Old 05-23-2014, 07:14 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I am rerouting where the dryer is to make use of a space in the house we don't need which will free up the current laundry room to be renovated into another purpose.  My washer is amazing- it has a high rpm spin, so the clothes are drier coming out than they were with my old washer.  It is set up currently as a portable, so I have it in a nook off the kitchen- and right by the back porch door where my clothesline is.  I set up a good cable clothesline off my porch, though I plan to put up a second as well- large family. And I will look at running a retractable line indoors for really crappy weather.  My *goal* is to not use the dryer at this point, but I live in a fairly damp area for much of the year, so I will keep it just in case.  It will be in a slightly less convenient location, but since I only plan to actually use it as a last resort, that should be ok. 

I also am going to go make use of the laundromat to get everything all caught up at once (I am totally behind after a cross country move and a broken washer.) And will plan to do that once a month or so for large linens. My washer isn't large capacity, but is high efficiency.  It was a kijiji find- free! and brand new.  I can cope with less capacity. :)

Everyone has given me a lot to think about, and I have decided not to completely ditch the dryer just yet, but to be very conscious of when, how, and if I choose to use it. 

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Old 05-23-2014, 08:20 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RainbowAsylum View Post
 

  My washer is amazing- it has a high rpm spin, so the clothes are drier coming out than they were with my old washer.  

While clothes do dry faster when well-spun, it can actually make clothes stiffer on the line and jersey knit clothes especially get stretched out and without the dryer won't "bounce back".  If you have to extra time to dry, use the lowest spin setting for line drying.


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Old 05-23-2014, 08:47 AM
 
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I live in a humid climate and have very thick cloth diapers. I suppose I *could* return to old style unfolded diapers and line dry them over a couple of days, but for my sanity and conserving resources of patience and kindness for my very little kids and husband (who brings two sets of heavy work clothes home filthy every day), my dryer is an absolute must-have. It may be considered a luxury to some, but I know myself, and I need a dryer!

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Old 05-25-2014, 08:28 PM
 
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In the warmer months I line dry everything except towels and sheets.  Sheets because of pollen, dust etc and towels don't seem to get soft when line dried.  I love using my clothesline and dryer rack :)  Never thought about going dryer free though...hmmm something to think about.


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Old 05-26-2014, 08:55 AM - Thread Starter
 
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So far so good, but I think I will probably resort to my dryer briefly today as I planned badly and missed that it is supposed to rain for three days.  I can dry the lighter stuff indoors, but diapers and towels really might be better in the dryer for today. 

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Old 05-26-2014, 09:39 AM
 
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That's another reason I like my dryer here, even in the "dry" months:  I still can't plan on a "laundry day" from week to week.  I really need to take it one load at a time, and be prepared to make a good day "laundry day".  But if I happen to not be home that day..... well, I'm not getting rid of my dryer any time soon.


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Old 05-26-2014, 10:38 AM
 
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No, my dryer is not an absolute necessity, but doing laundry would be a bit harder without it. We have neither an indoor nor an outdoor line and my neighbor might think it weird or rude if I ask her if I could occasionally (once a week?) come next door to hang our laundry on her line. I might call her about it, though, as she certainly isn't using it while she's "up north" (we're in Florida and she's a snowbird, gone for the summer).

 

We lived with my in-laws from late 2010 until early 2012 and I hadn't seen an indoor clothes line until then. They hung it in their garage from the door from the laundry room to the garage, across the garage, parallel with the garage door. It was on the opposite side from the garage door so it worked pretty well especially on hot days, though that didn't make it very pleasant for whoever had to step out that door and hang up the laundry (sometimes me, usually my mother-in-law). I might talk to my husband and his dad about installing one in our new house if there is a suitable place. An indoor line would also be better for my husband, at least in the spring, because he seems to suffer from allergies.


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Old 05-26-2014, 02:21 PM
 
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Catholic Mama, maybe your neighbour would appreciate you borrowing herr line in the summer, as it would help keep her place from looking empty when she isn't there?

 

We've just gone through our first winter without a dryer and I haven't missed it one bit.  It helps that we were heating with wood and hanging our clothes on drying racks on the second-floor landing, where they could be dry within minutes.  Large sheets were hung on the railing and jeans on the stair railing closer to the wood stove.  Sometimes our clothes got a bit smoky (no back-draft protection on our stove) but believe it or not, I actually got compliments on the scent from people who love wood fires.  DH, the night-owl, would hang the clothes up at night (I would do a load in the evening) and I'd take it down in the morning.

I found our house was a lot dustier in the winter, but this was probably from the wood stove as much as from the laundry.

Now that it's Spring, we have enough nice weather here to hang out a load almost every day. As a SAHM, I have the luxury of looking out the window and determining if there's enough sun and breeze to do a quick load and have it dry before it rains or evening comes.  If you are working, or time is an issue, consider doing a load at night so it's ready to hang out first thing in the morning.  Some washers have a time delay mechanism, so you can load it up with clothes and soap and schedule it to start at a convenient time.

Lots of good points here from both sides.  Personally, I love the outdoors smell of line-dried sheets, and find stiff towels are good for exfoliation!

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Old 05-26-2014, 04:07 PM
 
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I wish my DH had the same outlook on clean dog hair!

 

I choose flats partly for the fact they can be dried on line or if in dryer the minimized time.  I use prefolds as a backup for my dog to use as a puppy pad.  She mostly goes out. But a dozen or so take a long time to dry.  

 

I REALLY hope next house has a line in already but if not one way or another one will go.

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Old 05-27-2014, 05:22 AM
 
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My next door neighbor said I can use her line until she comes home, and it made sense to her that her house would look less alone. Thanks for your encouragement!


May God bless you and His Blessed Mother Mary keep you!  :-)

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Old 05-28-2014, 08:09 AM
 
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Not a necessity. We do use our dryer as backup when we are stressed by excessive laundry production (throwing up, etc.) or behind on the laundry due to illness or travel.

I have written several articles about the finer points of line-drying, all of which are linked here:

http://articles.earthlingshandbook.org/2013/10/16/a-laundry-line-drying-system-that-will-work-for-you/

I started line-drying in 1990 and have never gone back to putting everything in the dryer. I still have some of the same clothes I had then! Things last a lot longer without the friction of the dryer.

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Old 05-31-2014, 10:18 PM
 
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I could live without one, but I'd rather not. I live in the pacific northwest and it would take way more effort than I want to spend keeping up with laundry if I had to hang it all on racks indoors.

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Old 07-08-2014, 04:25 AM
 
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No, I don't. I think when cloths drys naturally, it is best for them. When cloths drys in sun light, they looks shiny and also smells good. Sun light is necessary for all things.
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