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#61 of 89 Old 07-08-2007, 08:28 AM
 
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It's amazing when you read around the web about the level of dedication some have to prepping. I know one fellow on another forum who has been prepping for 30 years and he has truly sustainable living conditions. Wells with hand pumps, root cellars, years and years worth of food, water, clothing, communications in addition to the ability to fully power his entire farm with solar power.

Another fellow has an earth-sheltered home that actually has access to a naturally climate-controlled cave.

I think some level of prepping is good, especially since the government is starting to say that we need to. If they are getting in on it, there is probably at least some small threat.

I am prepping for weather-related situations and situations where diseases jump to humans. We're pacifists, so we'll never own firearms, and I know that is the kiss of death in a true SHTF situation.

We have a few weeks' worth of water and the ability to purify more for many months. I don't like to run to the store every time I need some little something, so we have a well-stocked pantry and that would last for about 6 months on rations. I can heat the house and cook without power. For those of you who have gas stoves in your kitchens... remember that it takes electricity to run the newer gas stoves now. I have seeds and access to irrigation. I know how to sew and am learning how to put up food (dried and canned). I do not rely on my freezer for any prepping... that food will be gone in days unless you have sustainable power source. We can fish (but not hunt for above said reason). We have a very well-stocked medicine cabinet, but we don't have preps for things like doing our own stitching up of cuts.

Basically, if we have something happen like a pandemic or a natural disaster, we are okay for about 6 months and comfortable. Beyond that, we might be okay, but uncomfortable. And ultimately, if someone (who is not prepped, but has a gun) realizes we are doing okay and wants to forcibly take what we have, we're toast.
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#62 of 89 Old 07-08-2007, 06:25 PM
 
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We don't have a gun, but DH is an archer and a really accurate shot with his bow and arrows.

We were a lot better prepared but then needed our food storage for a while so now we're building up again.

I think it's smart, especially to be prepared fore evacuation. We've had a tone of wilfires on our state and lots of people evacuated. you never know when a natural disaster, let alone a political one, is going to require you to get up and go.
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#63 of 89 Old 07-28-2007, 01:20 PM
 
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i'm curious as to all your thoughts on canned beans vs. dried beans. my thought is if it is indeed an emergency there will be little to no extra water and you can just heat canned beans without it where as dry beans need to soak. am i right in this or are dried better?

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#64 of 89 Old 07-28-2007, 03:37 PM
 
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I do both. Dry beans are much cheaper and a go choice for the long run when you will be living off of food storage for a while. Also, it's good to rotate it throughout the year - nice and healthy for the family. But, I also have canned beans, because you are right, in an emergency, I don't have time to soak and boil beans, and possibly no clean water for doing it.
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#65 of 89 Old 07-28-2007, 11:36 PM
 
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Originally Posted by alisaterry View Post
I do both. Dry beans are much cheaper and a go choice for the long run when you will be living off of food storage for a while. Also, it's good to rotate it throughout the year - nice and healthy for the family. But, I also have canned beans, because you are right, in an emergency, I don't have time to soak and boil beans, and possibly no clean water for doing it.
thanks.

one of our things with storage is we only want to buy what we will use NOW because we don't want to waste a ton of money only to have that food sit in a cupboard for x ammount of years and go bad. thankfully we aleady use a lot of wheat and oats and beans etc etc.

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#66 of 89 Old 07-29-2007, 12:28 PM
 
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I've been following this thread for a while. I used to think I would do ok survival wise until we had a power outage last summer. It happens often enough where the power flickers during bad weather. This time the power was off for about 5 hours. Around supper time. It was so embarrassing. It happened that I had no easy/quick food in our apartment. Everything had to be cooked/heated up. I think we ended up eating defrosted muffins for supper. : Like I said, we live in an apartment. We had no way of cooking food. No camp stove, BBQ, nothing. (To use on balcony of course )

What an eye opener. Just a reminder to people that it's not just the big things they need to prep for. I know some people might look at this thread like everyone's all Chicken Little and going overboard.
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#67 of 89 Old 02-20-2008, 08:20 PM
 
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#68 of 89 Old 02-23-2008, 11:15 AM
 
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subbing.

I haven't finished reading the thread yet but my challenge is first to get our 3 mo supply secured and then I want to store a *healthy* 1 year supply. I was reading that brown rice doesn't store well necessarily and it seems like so many food storage cookbooks have crap food no offense and if I'm going to be rotating my supply then I don't want to be stocking junk ya know?
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#69 of 89 Old 02-23-2008, 11:59 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Drewsmom View Post
I haven't finished reading the thread yet but my challenge is first to get our 3 mo supply secured and then I want to store a *healthy* 1 year supply. I was reading that brown rice doesn't store well necessarily and it seems like so many food storage cookbooks have crap food no offense and if I'm going to be rotating my supply then I don't want to be stocking junk ya know?
Not taking offense, but I'm not sure what your definition of crap/junk food is.

We store dehydrated potatoes, dehydrated fruits, assorted flours, canned veggies (many we canned up ourselves from our summer garden), 100% fruit juice (we use it as a substitute in baking for our dairy allergic DD), home canned meat broths, home canned chicken (raised organically by a local farmer friend), home canned beans (navy, pinto, etc), and also an assortment of other commercially prepared foods that store well.

About half of our food storage is food that we bought locally or grew ourselves and then dehydrated or canned using our pressure canner.

Our method has been to work hard during the summer harvest and preserve much of what we grow and then also buy locally from farmers. We haven't yet hit that 1 year mark, but we estimate a good 6 months supply.

In addition to that I'm picking up extras at the grocery store. For instance, in addition to the one can of baking powder I'm currently using I have two in my pantry that are unopened. Each trip to the grocery store we buy a few more cans/jars/boxes of what we typically consume.

Our plan is to only buy foods we regularly eat for our food storage.

We're also building a root cellar this summer and planning our garden a bit differently. That will give us "fresh" root cellared veggies and fruits over the winter months. They certainly won't store out a full year, but will give us a nice mix with the canned and dried fruits and veggies.
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#70 of 89 Old 02-23-2008, 12:08 PM
 
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Oh, and your storage method really helps determine the long term storage capabilities of foods.

We bought some storage buckets (similar to these) http://www.preparedness.com/col5galplasb1.html

and mylar bags
http://www.sorbentsystems.com/mylar.html

to help foods that don't store well on their own.

You can add in oxygen absorbers to give them even great shelf life
http://sorbentsystems.com/o2absorbers.html
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#71 of 89 Old 02-23-2008, 01:04 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Heres some ideas-

Alpine Aire Foods- They are totally Natural http://www.aa-foods.com/
Mary Janes- http://products.maryjanesfarm.org/pf...asp?dept_id=38
Justomatoes.com- Their pre packaged back packing packs are perfect

MRE Depot- Ok yeah most is junk, but they have really yummy canned butter.

We also buy bulk bags of the following, put them in white paint type buckets(the foods safe ones have the #2 in the little recycle symbols) with 2-3 oxygen absorbers inside, the following stuff will store a very long time ...

Wheat(need a grinder you can get a hand one for about$100)
Powdered milk(at least 15 years)
Beans
Quinoa
Flax seeds
buckwheat
brown rice(yeah I know they this doesn't store long, but mine has been going for 3 years and its still ok)
Rolled Oats
Honey(this will last forever, really, buy it in big buckets from a honey farm,the stuff in the grocery store can legally be cut with up to 30% corn syrup with out labeling it as so)
Lentils
Raw Sugar
Molasse
Sprout mix- Make your own veggis
Sugar- yea I keep regular sugar for canning foods
Salt- Can't have enough good sea salt
Oil- Coconut oil stores best

We do a year of these and then 3 months of what we eat on a regular basis.
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#72 of 89 Old 02-23-2008, 05:47 PM
 
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Originally Posted by KariM View Post
Oh, and your storage method really helps determine the long term storage capabilities of foods.

We bought some storage buckets (similar to these) http://www.preparedness.com/col5galplasb1.html

and mylar bags
http://www.sorbentsystems.com/mylar.html

to help foods that don't store well on their own.

You can add in oxygen absorbers to give them even great shelf life
http://sorbentsystems.com/o2absorbers.html
Would oxygen absorbers extend the shelf life of wheat flour?
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#73 of 89 Old 02-23-2008, 06:37 PM - Thread Starter
 
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No, wheat flour has a shelf life of 6 months tops. Its best to grind your wheat as you need it.
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#74 of 89 Old 02-23-2008, 07:28 PM
 
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Do you have a favorite wheat grinder?
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#75 of 89 Old 02-23-2008, 07:30 PM
 
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PS - I'm off to buy some supplies for a 72-hour kit and I was just thinking how awesome it is to be a breastfeeding mommy because all I need to pack for the baby is some extra clothes and diapers. Voila!
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#76 of 89 Old 02-23-2008, 07:53 PM
 
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I wondered what happened to this thread! We don't have anywhere to store supplies right now, but we will once we buy a house this summer.

And I have been reading about wilderness survival which I want to teach the kids. Les Stroud recommends the Leatherman Wave multitool. So that's on my wishlist next time I have $$.

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#77 of 89 Old 02-23-2008, 08:01 PM
 
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Can any of you recommend a thorough but compact first aid guide to include in my emergency kit?
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#78 of 89 Old 02-23-2008, 10:14 PM
 
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Originally Posted by alisaterry View Post
Would oxygen absorbers extend the shelf life of wheat flour?

They will if you also seal the whole wheat flour in a vacuum. This site gives your whole wheat flour a shelf life of about 5 years in an oxygen free storage container.

http://standeyo.com/News_Files/Food/...helf_Life.html

We use mylar bags sealed with oxygen absorbers in them, but haven't yet had 5 years to test.
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#79 of 89 Old 02-23-2008, 10:42 PM
 
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#80 of 89 Old 02-24-2008, 02:24 AM
 
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hi...i'm new to all of this and have a few questions...i dont' know where to start? do you mamas live in the US? should i be keeping all of these supplies at home? we have a full unfinished basement, so i have plenty of room. and should i keep some in my car? i guess i dotn' even know exactly what i am preparing FOR or AGAINST? fwiw, we live in a small midwest town with a large public university (including its own nuclear reactor...i know we are often on lists of potential terrorist attacks...is that what you all mean?) and we are also in tornado alley...so that is another possible disaster i am thinking of. dh and i live in a small home in teh center of our town with our dd, who is 13 months. i'm just so confused...any help is much appreciated!!

ETA: also..what is the MT thread? maybe that is why i feel like i missed something??

amanda... lovin' my dh since 2004 and mama to dd (3), ds (18 months) and expecting someone new Oct 2010.
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#81 of 89 Old 02-24-2008, 02:44 AM
 
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hi...i'm new to all of this and have a few questions...i dont' know where to start? do you mamas live in the US? should i be keeping all of these supplies at home? we have a full unfinished basement, so i have plenty of room. and should i keep some in my car? i guess i dotn' even know exactly what i am preparing FOR or AGAINST? fwiw, we live in a small midwest town with a large public university (including its own nuclear reactor...i know we are often on lists of potential terrorist attacks...is that what you all mean?) and we are also in tornado alley...so that is another possible disaster i am thinking of. dh and i live in a small home in teh center of our town with our dd, who is 13 months. i'm just so confused...any help is much appreciated!!

ETA: also..what is the MT thread? maybe that is why i feel like i missed something??
MT isn't a member anymore. She was discussing related issues in the vaccine forums and we moved the topic here since this is where it belongs.

This is preparation for anything, from a job loss to a power outage to an all out terrorist attack. You should have an emergency kit in your car, an evacuation kit in your house in case of fire, etc, and then at least a year's supply of food and goods in your home. If you look over the thread from the beginning there is tons of information and web links.
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#82 of 89 Old 02-24-2008, 09:41 AM
 
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I'll admit that I have some food in my preps that I wouldn't normally eat otherwise. The good news is that my mother, who lives with us, was raised on this kind of food (for example, Spam), so she contributes by rotating out some of these foods. I know you should store what you eat and eat what you store, but I haven't learned how to can meat yet, so...

Since I last posted on this thread, I now have about a 1 year supply of food. Water is still my weak point.

As an aside, something that is important to remember is that the "sell-by" or "good-by" dates on foods means that the *quality* of the food cannot be guaranteed after that date. You have to be aware of bulging cans, funny smells, etc. but most canned foods actually last about twice as long as the dates given. Dried grains and pastas last almost forever. Ground flour actually will last about 2 years assuming you have popped it in the freezer to get rid of nasties, then sealed it up to keep the nasties out. Near to the 2 year mark, it might not bake like fresh flour, but it won't hurt you.
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#83 of 89 Old 02-24-2008, 11:43 AM
 
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hi...i'm new to all of this and have a few questions...i dont' know where to start? do you mamas live in the US? should i be keeping all of these supplies at home? we have a full unfinished basement, so i have plenty of room. and should i keep some in my car? i guess i dotn' even know exactly what i am preparing FOR or AGAINST? fwiw, we live in a small midwest town with a large public university (including its own nuclear reactor...i know we are often on lists of potential terrorist attacks...is that what you all mean?) and we are also in tornado alley...so that is another possible disaster i am thinking of. dh and i live in a small home in teh center of our town with our dd, who is 13 months. i'm just so confused...any help is much appreciated!!
We're preparing for multiple scenerios - some as simple as winter storms (we also live in the Midwest and can get some horrendous ice and snow storms) and some far more complex.

I'm currently working on food storage, supply storage, and acquiring self-reliance skills. I am also working on ensuring that we all have good supplies of outdoor clothing appropriate for our weather conditions - good quality winter boots, jackets, snow pants, etc. I try to keep a size or two ahead on the kids' clothing and make sure we have at least a year's clothing (or fabric and patterns) in the house.

For water we usually have 5 gallons in our big Berkey water filter system and another two gallons in a jug upstairs. Our hot water tank holds 40 gallons of potable water, so in an uber emergency we'd have that as well. We're fortunate in that we live near one of the Great Lakes. Our Berkey system supposedly will filter all contaminents from water (with the exception of radiation) and we are planning to rely on that along with collected rainwater if we had a longer term interruption to our water supply.

I keep our supplies in our camper and in our house. In case of evacuation we're hopeful that we'd be able to take the pop-up with us. We really ought to pull together some 72 hour back-pack evacuation kits, too, though.
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#84 of 89 Old 02-25-2008, 03:33 AM
 
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I put together a back pack of supplies as a 72 hour kit in case we ever need to evacuate. I just need to add copies of important records/identification and some extra changes of clothes. It feels good to at least be a little more prepared! I will say, co-sleeping is so comforting. I would hate to have to run across the house to my children if there was a fire or an earthquake.
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#85 of 89 Old 02-25-2008, 12:48 PM
 
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I borrowed a Family Grain Mill. It works great and grinds pretty fine.

I just ordered one. I found that there is an adapter available so you can use a Kitchen Aid mixer to power it. There is also a a Bosch adapter. Altogether it was $140.95 for the base(for hand grinding), the mill and the adapter. Just the mill and base are about $120.

Hand grinding with this mill is not difficult. It probably would help to take turns if you were grinding lots.

Amy at Stone Fence Farm
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#86 of 89 Old 02-26-2008, 04:18 AM
 
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Well, I'm sort of on this bandwagon. DH is in the military, and we move every 2-3 years, never to a place of our choice, so, we generally have 1) limited space and 2) limited say in where we end up.

So, we're trying to build up a full six month supply of food, a one month supply of water, and we're trying to get a comprehensive first aid kit and survival gear together. DH is in charge of the survival gear, I'm in charge of the first aid and food.

I'm actually getting a lot off the frontier wholesale site as far as food. I can get it organic, it's stuff I can easily rotate into our regular meals (ie...TVP, dehydrated veggies/fruit, dry milk (not my favorite, but I'll use it for cooking/baking, etc.), lots of yummy stuff, so, it won't be blown money. Plus, it's organic, so I won't be feeding my family "junk"...I'm not concerned about feeding my family junk during a time of crisis...i'm more concerned about rotating it back in when it *isn't* needed...(which, hopefully, will be forever). This way, by getting it organic, I'm much more likely to use it. Although DH put in a heavy vote for cans of corned beef hash, which he will happily work back into rotation

The hardest part for me is prioritizing what to get for the first aid kid. I can't get everything all at once - whenever I go to the store, I pick up a few more items, but, I swear, I could spend half an hour trying to decide between two items.
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#87 of 89 Old 02-26-2008, 04:02 PM
 
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I've been wondering where a thread like this was on MDC. We've started prepping here a lot more. I usually keep a few basic supplies on hand for emergencies and 1st aid and a least a month or two's food in the pantry and that's enough for power outages, hurricanes, or tornadoes that we may see here. Lately my preps have expanded A LOT since I've become very concerned over the economic state. I've bought a woodburning stove and wonder washer to make life w/o electricity easier. We've also stocked a year's supply or close to it of cleaning, bath and body care, more 1st aid, lighting (candles, oil lamps, extras, oil), ammo and fishing gear, livestock feed, and tons of food. I'm still working on our list. Once we've finished the basics we'll soon be adding homeschooling supplies, more medical gear, entertainment, food and livestock feed. Lots more to do to be prepared.
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#88 of 89 Old 02-26-2008, 05:17 PM
 
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The hardest part for me is prioritizing what to get for the first aid kid. I can't get everything all at once - whenever I go to the store, I pick up a few more items, but, I swear, I could spend half an hour trying to decide between two items.
My top priorities for first aid are Aloe Vera and Bandages.
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#89 of 89 Old 02-26-2008, 10:04 PM
 
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I've got that stuff (bandages, aloe, needles, some ace bandages, etc)...finished off most of my list today. I'm starting to think about the more hard core stuff..like, would I rather be protected against radiation or bio-agents?

I'm very happy to know that right now, I can deal with most minor mishaps. I want to get a book, though, b/c I'm not sure I'll be "together" enough in an emergency to remember what I've learned in the past. I'm either spot on or a bloomin' idiot Any one have a goof basic first aid book recommendation?
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