Issues With Pyrex - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 12 Old 08-27-2008, 08:26 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Pyrex is often recommended on here for a safe non plastic storage. I just read this article at consumeraffairs.com about how the new Pyrex glass is actually exploding when exposed to high temp changes. Almost all issues happen with Pyrex since 1998 when a new company, World Kitchen, licensed the name from Corning and has been manufacturing it. But it is only in certain countries.....

http://www.consumeraffairs.com/news0.../08/pyrex.html
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#2 of 12 Old 08-27-2008, 09:36 AM
 
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Wow, thats frightening... I wonder what kind of glass Anchor Hocking uses? Thats what I've been buying recently cause' its made in the Ohio...
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#3 of 12 Old 08-27-2008, 10:40 AM - Thread Starter
 
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To quote from the article:

"Not just Pyrex

It's not just Pyrex that is exploding. Anchor Hocking, which makes similar dishes that can be found at Wal-Mart and other stores, has generated 48 complaints in the ConsumerAffairs.com database.

In the most dramatic case, a woman who asked to remain anonymous, lost much of her eyesight for months after an Anchor Hocking dish exploded while she was standing over it. Little bits of glass were embedded all over her face, eyes and in the ceiling above her head.

Marianne Jackson, a representative of Anchor Hocking, which also uses tempered soda lime, said that the failure rate for the company's dishes is "one one-hundredth of a percentile" and said she's never heard of anyone being seriously injured by the dishes.

She said tempered soda lime is safer than borosilicate because it does not break into large dangerous shards.

Like Glancy of Pyrex, Jackson blamed consumers for being injured by her company's products.

“Ninety nine percent of the time, consumers don't read their care and use,” she said."
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#4 of 12 Old 08-27-2008, 11:07 AM
 
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Originally Posted by lucyem View Post
Like Glancy of Pyrex, Jackson blamed consumers for being injured by her company's products.

“Ninety nine percent of the time, consumers don't read their care and use,” she said."
When a company knows this and still sells a product that injures people with TYPICAL use (as opposed to instructed use), that's a frikkin crime.

Instructions are always so limited anyway. You can't use this like this, you can't use it like that, always use gloves and goggles when handling your Pyrex, etc.

Homeschooling mama to 6 year old DD.

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#5 of 12 Old 08-27-2008, 11:26 AM
 
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Anything made with a natural products (sand - glass; sand - stonewear) will have weaknesses and are subject to shatter, break or explode.

Exploding glasswear and stonewear is a risk of using such products.
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#6 of 12 Old 08-27-2008, 01:29 PM
 
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I could be wrong, but I thought that Pyrex was specifically advertised to allow you to put something right from the fridge (or maybe even freezer) into the oven, and maybe vice versa.

But maybe that was some other dish product.

Homeschooling mama to 6 year old DD.

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#7 of 12 Old 08-27-2008, 02:21 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Denvergirlie View Post
Anything made with a natural products (sand - glass; sand - stonewear) will have weaknesses and are subject to shatter, break or explode.

Exploding glasswear and stonewear is a risk of using such products.
If you pour boiling water over a plate, it will likely break. Some shapes are stronger (ie spheres, so half spheres like bowls are stronger than flat things like plates) and can take faster temperature changes.

Someone posted on here a while back about breaking a pyrex dish by pouring cold wine onto the hot dish.

If I'm going from the freezer to the oven, I put the dish in a cold oven, then turn it on, rather than preheating it.

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#8 of 12 Old 08-27-2008, 02:23 PM
 
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Originally Posted by laohaire View Post
I could be wrong, but I thought that Pyrex was specifically advertised to allow you to put something right from the fridge (or maybe even freezer) into the oven, and maybe vice versa.

But maybe that was some other dish product.
I think I read the same thing....

About 6 yrs ago, I had a Pyrex scatter in my oven at 350 degrees. I haven't used Pyrex since.
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#9 of 12 Old 08-27-2008, 03:00 PM
 
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I've broken Pyrex by accidentally abusing it. You can't let it go through extreme temperature changes! It's a fact of the material. Freezer is ok, but you can't put a frozen casserole into a hot oven.

I love my Pyrex, and have many vintage pieces I still cook with. But I'm cautious with it. It's not invincible.

Mom to DD1 (11/1999),  DD2 (07/2003), and DS (11/2012), all born at home and cloth diapered. 

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#10 of 12 Old 08-27-2008, 05:38 PM
 
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Pyrex was originally made with a shock-resistant glass. When they switched manufacturers though, that went away and now they just use a regular glass. So yes, things have changed over the years. I believe the Pyrex manufactured in the EU is still shock resistant, though.

Regardless, it is never a good idea to expose any glass or ceramic to severe temperature shocks. I never set a glass pan straight from the oven on my cold tile countertops. The countertop could take it, the dish probably couldn't. If I want to reheat something that's in glass, I put the cold glass into a cold oven (as a pp mentioned) and heat the oven up with the dish inside.

I've had glass canning jars shatter in the sink when I drain pasta. And you know canning jars are built to stand up to heat. They just can't handle the sudden shock.

It's always a good idea to follow common sense protocols when cooking with glass or ceramic. And sometimes, even being as careful as possible, glass fails. Which means it had been weakened by something... using a sharp knife on your glass and scratching it, air bubbles, nicks, chips, etc., can all cause the glass to explode, crack, break.

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#11 of 12 Old 08-27-2008, 06:06 PM
 
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ever poured room temp water over an ice cube and had the ice cube crack?

same thing.

I remember when I was learning to cook, my mother told me not to put the hot pyrex pan on the counter - it wasn't to save the counter, it was to keep the pan from breaking.

I don't think this is a new thing.
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#12 of 12 Old 08-27-2008, 06:54 PM
 
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I treat my Pyrex just like a Mason jar, they are strong but not industructable.

If I'm freezing in a jar of say, cooked hamburger, I let the hamburger cool slightly, drain and put into a room temp jar, then I put it in the fridge for a while (maybe overnight) before I transfer it to the freezer.

My dad was cooking with a pot with a glass lid, and he put the lid straight into the "hot" dishwater and it shattered because even hot water wasn't as hot as the cooking temp. It's not just Pyrex.
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