If you don't stockpile for disasters why? - Page 4 - Mothering Forums
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The Mindful Home > If you don't stockpile for disasters why?
grniys's Avatar grniys 05:33 PM 10-10-2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by choli View Post
I didn't say it was bad karma to be well supplied. I said it's better karma to contribute more to the food bank.


I strongly believe that it's better karma to give to others than to "stockpile" or hoard for myself.
I needed that reminder. Not on the food issue though (I don't keep much in stock in my pantry... just enough to get us by if we're short grocery money sometime). I just bought some new, better sewing stuff and wasn't sure what to do with my old stuff. I was just going to keep it around in case I ever needed it... but I most likely won't.

I absolutely agree with the karma thing. Thanks for the reminder.

tinybutterfly's Avatar tinybutterfly 06:05 PM 10-10-2008
I haven't had a chance to read all the replies yet. We don't stockpile, but I do want to get our emergency kit together after letting it slide for several years and would also like to put away about three months worth of stuff in the pantry and a regular sized freezer ( the kind attached to our fridge) for winter. Also would rather pay lower prices if I can now if prices do go up pretty soon. Stocking up, but not stockpiling.

We live where there are tornadoes, floods, winter weather some years, we had some earthquake activity this year AND the edge of Ike came through and caused issues this year. Who says the midwest is boring.
georgia's Avatar georgia 06:46 PM 10-10-2008
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Thanks!
be11ydancer's Avatar be11ydancer 03:41 AM 10-11-2008
I haven't read all the replies but there are reasons other than the world ending to stockpile essential supplies.

If DH (sole income earner) suddenly became disabled or worse, there would be enough food to last us a while.

When we have all become ill in the past and no one could get to the store, we had enough food.

When my dad lost his job last month, they were able to live off the large amounts of dehydrated everything that they had been buying over the years. This helped them tremendously, and a lot of it tasted really good.

And I don't like going to the grocery store more often than I have to so it's better to buy 6 jars of peanut butter at once than to buy one every week.

When a work crew was replacing water lines recently and the water was shut off, it sure was nice to have bottles of water available. I just wash out the cranberry juice bottles and refill them with water and put in the back of a closet. It's no trouble really.

That said, I don't have any fuel storage in case of a power outage. But I did make a simple campfire pit in the backyard and could easily use it to cook with if necessary. If the power went out and was expected to be out for a long while, I'd just start cooking all the meat that's in the deep freeze... probably have a big bbq or something.
velochic's Avatar velochic 11:08 AM 10-11-2008
I do stockpile and I thought I'd just say something about the psychology of it.

When people are faced with tough times, they often feel powerless to do anything about it. Nature, work lay offs, the economy... none of these things can we control. But keeping our family fed and safe *IS* something we can control. Part of stockpiling is knowing that for a given period of time we *are* in control of making life easier for our families. Women are natural nurturers. Protecting our young is part of our nature. That is why I prepare for disasters both natural and man-made. Nature compels me to.

I agree that just going out and buying $1000 worth of food you may or may not eat is foolish. Stocking up in a panic is irrational. You *will* waste in that case. That's why I have been preparing in the fat years (several) for the lean. And I have worked on my self-sufficiency skills, too. Learning how to be a good gardener, preserving and purchasing seeds, knowing how to preserve food even in an emergency (and buying the tools to do so), learning back-to-basics skills that will allow us to continue when others don't know what to do. It's all part of the process... it's not just buying more food. The bottom line is that you have to know how to live sustainably in the case of a major disaster or depression. The large stockpile of food allows you to get your ducks in the proverbial row as you gear up to live in sustainability mode. If nothing happens, a prudent prepper will have made sure that nothing goes to waste. They will have their rotation system set up and document expiry dates and plan their daily consumption around that. Over the years I have saved at least $5,000 in groceries alone by stocking up. And only 1 time has anything gone to waste... 4 cartons of UHT milk went over the expiry before we could use them.
kijip's Avatar kijip 12:22 PM 10-11-2008
I agree with everyone who says the sky is not falling. I am not particularly worried about the economy just now.

But I have a long term stock of food and supplies. And I garden on a tiny urban lot, we have chickens with another family and I own/use things like a pressure canner.

The assumption that everyone who is interested in stockpiling and self sufficiency is living in fear of economic collapse is incorrect. All of the people I know IRL who do this are super community minded and none are especially scared about social and economic collapse.
Juliacat's Avatar Juliacat 10:31 PM 10-12-2008
I guess I get discouraged reading things like "you'll need 3 gallons of water per person per day." Assuming 3 days, WHERE THE HELL AM I SUPPOSED TO STORE 9 GALLONS OF WATER?!?!?!?!? There's barely enough room in our house for US!

I'd probably be more likely to stockpile if I knew what kind of disaster we were going to be dealing with!
fek&fuzz's Avatar fek&fuzz 10:53 PM 10-12-2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Juliacat View Post
I guess I get discouraged reading things like "you'll need 3 gallons of water per person per day." Assuming 3 days, WHERE THE HELL AM I SUPPOSED TO STORE 9 GALLONS OF WATER?!?!?!?!? There's barely enough room in our house for US!

I'd probably be more likely to stockpile if I knew what kind of disaster we were going to be dealing with!
It's only one gallon of water per person per day. You can store it under beds, backs of closets, cabinets. Get creative.

Do you have any weather issues in your area that cause power outages? Hurricanes, storms, tornadoes, floods, etc? We have some bad winter storms, and we've had alerts where we've had to boil water for a day or two due to a water main issue. It was nice to have a few gallons on hand for that.

You don't have to be stockpiling for the end of the world. Just getting a few things to have on hand in the event of a storm, power outage, water issue, etc.
Mama Dragon's Avatar Mama Dragon 10:57 PM 10-12-2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by fek&fuzz View Post
It's only one gallon of water per person per day. You can store it under beds, backs of closets, cabinets. Get creative.

Do you have any weather issues in your area that cause power outages? Hurricanes, storms, tornadoes, floods, etc? We have some bad winter storms, and we've had alerts where we've had to boil water for a day or two due to a water main issue. It was nice to have a few gallons on hand for that.

You don't have to be stockpiling for the end of the world. Just getting a few things to have on hand in the event of a storm, power outage, water issue, etc.
I thought it was 3? For bathing, drinking, cooking? 1 gallon wouldn't last long I think?
lacysmommy's Avatar lacysmommy 02:07 AM 10-13-2008
Having water on hand is VERY IMPORTANT, even if you don't store anything else. Even just a couple gallons for the unexpected. I didn't think we needed it, because we live close to a large water source, have bleach and a water purifier (we're campers), and we pay our water bill. But our water main broke one day and I didn't have any water on hand to flush toilets, wash hands, or even drink. It took a couple days to fix it, so we didn't have water for a while. With two kids, it is very difficult to not have water on hand. It is a major PITA to go down a couple blocks to the lake to retrieve it, so that's really only a viable solution in a true emergency situation (thinking earthquake for us). I think you can also use the water in your water heater as water storage, but I'm not sure how you do that. I now know better and will be stocking up on water as soon as I can! I'm planning on getting a couple of the slim packs-- they have a spout and hold about 3-4 gallons. I will probably get 4 of them and store them in our carport or the storage shed out back.
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