How do I add humidity to my home without an actual humidifier machine? - Mothering Forums
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 13 Old 11-01-2008, 09:39 PM - Thread Starter
 
chinaKat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 2,263
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We started heating with a pellet stove this year and so far I love it. LOVE it. The only drawback I've noticed thus far is that it's kind of dry in here. I'd rather not run a humidifier, because of the huge energy costs incurred.

I have an ovenware bowl of water sitting on top of the pellet stove, but it doesn't evaporate like it does on a wood stove -- it's not really all that hot on top of the stove -- it seems like most of the heat is blown forward.

Any suggestions for adding humidity to the air in my house?
chinaKat is offline  
#2 of 13 Old 11-01-2008, 11:25 PM
 
wendyland's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: curbside
Posts: 1,730
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
This suggestion is kind of out there, but it's what we did last year. We have a laundry shoot in our hallway that goes to the basement. My husband took the hose that blows the hot air from our dryer to the outside of the house and instead redirected it to blow into the laundry shoot. So, all the hot, moist air went in the hallway instead of outside. (don't use dryer sheets if you do this. they contain toxic chemicals)

We also boil water on the stove and save our hot water from showers. We just clog the drain instead of letting the water go down the drain. We drain it once the water is cold or when someone else needs to bathe.

Wendy - mom to dd1(11), dd2(7), dd3(3)
wendyland is offline  
#3 of 13 Old 11-02-2008, 12:34 PM
 
yeahwhat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 555
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Can you put a pot of water inf front of the stove then?

Just putting multiple bowls of water around the house will add a bit of moisture if the air is dry.
yeahwhat is offline  
#4 of 13 Old 11-02-2008, 12:48 PM
 
mpchez's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 148
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
i use a laundry rack to dry clothes indoors,and i do think it helps a bit with the humidity in the winter
mpchez is offline  
#5 of 13 Old 11-02-2008, 01:52 PM
 
sunnysandiegan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 4,407
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Plants also help with indoor humidity.

"Kind words can be short and easy to speak, but their echoes are truly endless." - Mother Teresa

sunnysandiegan is offline  
#6 of 13 Old 11-02-2008, 03:31 PM
 
CarrieMF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Alberta/Saskatchewan
Posts: 8,930
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Any water sitting out will add humidity. Cool water is better than warm water. no it doesn't evaporate as fast but warm water can cause mold & bacteria issues.
CarrieMF is offline  
#7 of 13 Old 11-04-2008, 04:20 PM
 
TeaghansMama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: up and gone to Carolina
Posts: 818
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
i boil water on the stove. i love how it makes our first floor all warm and steamy and the windows fog up.
TeaghansMama is offline  
#8 of 13 Old 11-04-2008, 04:49 PM
 
hollyvangogh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 2,520
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by wendyland View Post
This suggestion is kind of out there, but it's what we did last year. We have a laundry shoot in our hallway that goes to the basement. My husband took the hose that blows the hot air from our dryer to the outside of the house and instead redirected it to blow into the laundry shoot. So, all the hot, moist air went in the hallway instead of outside. (don't use dryer sheets if you do this. they contain toxic chemicals)
I asked my DH about doing something similar. He said it was a huge fire hazard.
hollyvangogh is offline  
#9 of 13 Old 11-04-2008, 05:13 PM
 
quantumleap's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Atlantic Canada
Posts: 1,862
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
We were doing the dryer thing for awhile this fall too. The fire hazzard risk is fairly low if you don't leave things unattended and are sure to have some sort of lint trap on the outgoing air (we were using some pantyhose). We live in the arctic (read: a really cold desert), and the dryer was actually putting too much moisture into our house! I'm tempted to try it one more time, as things have gotten a lot dryer since September. Anyway, there are also these valve things, where you can choose to route your dryer air outside, or you can slide this little do-hickey over and vent the air into your house. Our set up doesn't allow for this sort of thing, but I think it would be the perfect solution as it allows you to control moisture levels in your home (the beginning of the cycle has a heck of a lot more water in it, logically).

We also keep a pot of water on the stove, but I have no experience with pellet stoves (although, I did recently learn that you can burn random organic material in them, like coffee grounds, if it's dry stuff). We also leave small dishes of water on/near heating vents, but obviously this won't work too well if you have crawlers or otherwise curious and floor level children. What about leaving the bathroom door open while you shower?

For greater things are yet to come...

quantumleap is offline  
#10 of 13 Old 11-04-2008, 07:43 PM
 
grahamsmom98's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 2,301
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
We heat with a wood stove (with electric forced air heat for the back-up) and we live in a dry area (inland Washington state)

We use an inexpensive vaporizer. I fill it to the top of the water line each morning and let it run all day. It's extra nice when I add some eo or fragrance oil to it. Makes the whole house cozy and wonderfully scented.
grahamsmom98 is offline  
#11 of 13 Old 11-04-2008, 07:55 PM
 
hollyvangogh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 2,520
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
GrahamsMom98: I love your siggy!
hollyvangogh is offline  
#12 of 13 Old 11-04-2008, 11:33 PM
 
TEAK's Mom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Juneau, AK
Posts: 2,252
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hang your laundry to dry indoors. It adds moisture to the air and saves electricity.
TEAK's Mom is offline  
#13 of 13 Old 11-05-2008, 12:27 AM
 
His Own's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 236
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I just use a humidifier, but I know some folks put a pan or bowl of water near the heat source in the bedrooms. Some of the water will evaporate into the air.
His Own is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off