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#61 of 87 Old 12-12-2008, 05:38 PM
 
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We actually are Catholic - the cost of K-8 for the Catholic School at our church is about what you said, but the local Catholic High Schools I priced were about $15,000 - $20,000 per kid per year. I was pretty surprised myself...
Holy Cow! Are you sure you're not looking at an independent PRIVATE school that just happens to offer Catholic religious instruction as opposed to a Catholic PAROCHIAL school connected to the archdiocese? There's a big difference. Here, independent schools with Catholic religious instruction are part of the New York State Association of Independent Schools while the Archdiocese (i.e. Catholic Church) runs the Parochial schools.

Here in NYC:

Cathedral High School (Parochial, Archdiocese) - Yearly tuition=$6,025
St. Jean Baptiste High School (Parochial, Archdiocese) - Yearly tuition=$6,450

Covent of the Sacred Heart (Independent, private school with Catholic Instruction, NOT connected to archdiocese) - Yearly tuition=$30,000.
Loyola High School (Independent, private school with Catholic Instruction, NOT connected to archdiocese) - Yearly tuition=$25,680

The Archdiocese here will advertise and promote all schools that provide a Catholic education, but they are only in charge of the Parochial ones. The private ones run themselves with no input from the Church with regards to curriculum. There is a HUGE price difference between the two.

In my non-Catholic opinion, the Catholic Church does an excellent job educating kids, far better than the city.

Hope I didn't get too complicated.
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#62 of 87 Old 12-12-2008, 05:38 PM - Thread Starter
 
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We are in Maryland and we do not have open enrollment. I have to say that even if we did, I would have to move before the kids were in high school for MY WELL-BEING. I can stick it out in this neighborhood for a few more years for the sake of the kids because the elementary school is good and all that, but schools aside, dh and are are really unhappy here for ourselves. It actually makes me really depressed to live here and I am a pretty happy person who has been able to make the best of lots of different places, (Chicago, DC, Kentucky, West Virginia, Peru, DC, and other parts of Maryland). We will move - it is just a question of when and to where.
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#63 of 87 Old 12-12-2008, 05:44 PM - Thread Starter
 
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KateKat - Sorry I cross-posted. Now that is a good question, I am not sure if they are affiliated or what the actual arrangement is? We are pretty far out in the suburbs and I checked the 8 schools that I have heard of people around here sending their kids to for high school and that is what I came up with...there are schools farther away, but for my initial research I pretty much limited to the ones that all the kids around here seem to go to (for carpooling, social, distance reasons, etc.)

Anyway, fabulous questions. I will do more research!!!
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#64 of 87 Old 12-12-2008, 08:46 PM
 
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I can stick it out in this neighborhood for a few more years
Then that is what I would do.
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#65 of 87 Old 12-13-2008, 01:05 AM
 
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No it's not "smart", but honestly you seem to have the best hold financially of anyone I have ever seen who did it.


Fix your house, put it for sale, let the kids finish the school year. Save up more and make it 12 months EF for the NEW place.




You only live once. Happiness is worth it. Make sure you have life insurance to cover it. And keep your eyes PEELED for better deals in AND around your "ideal". Get a home warranty and an EXCELLENT home inspection.


Have a plan B for if hubby's work changes or something "bad" happens.



Good luck.

Resistance is futile Matey
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#66 of 87 Old 12-13-2008, 07:55 AM
 
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Ours was:

stay in our house and put kids in private school

or

move and put our kids in public school

We chose to move. The education is just as good and we have the house of our dreams, for the same price.

We are beyond happy.

Sgt. Renninger, Ofc. Owens, Ofc. Griswold, Ofc. Richards, Deputy Mundell
Gone but not fogotten.
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#67 of 87 Old 12-13-2008, 01:12 PM
 
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Here in the Chicago area, Catholic K-8 is about 2K-4K per child depending on school and parish. Catholic HS is 9K-14K depending on the school. That is just tuition though. If you child does a sport or dance team etc add another 5K per year per child. Also add all the fundraising you have to do for any Catholic education and involvement in the school and church.

"The true joy of life is the trip. The station is only a dream. It constantly out distances us."
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#68 of 87 Old 12-13-2008, 05:52 PM
 
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Which burb are you in, OP?
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#69 of 87 Old 12-13-2008, 07:02 PM - Thread Starter
 
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We are in Elkridge, MD which is in Howard County near Columbia.
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#70 of 87 Old 12-14-2008, 05:20 AM
 
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We are very house poor right now because we own a house and then bought a property that we plan to build on. We are handling 2 mortgages and are self financing the construction as much as possible. But we went into it with a LOT of savings. My DH's business is always on the verge of collapse so it is nerve wrecking at times. But I am also enjoying the challenge. We never had to think much about our spending before and now we do. I have cut our budget to a minimum in every area other than house payments. The property we bought is awesome and we love spending time there. Once the house is built and we sell this one, I can go back to work (until then I will be the general contractor for our home construction) and things will be a little better. I would much rather have our dream house than waste my $$ on cable TV, eating out, or buying crap I don't need. But if we didn't start with a big down payment, lots of savings, and equity in our current house I would not have done it.

Kris wife to Stew and mom to Joey 8/03 who cares for , 2 frogs and a worm
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#71 of 87 Old 12-14-2008, 02:42 PM
 
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65% % of your income on housing is insane in this economy. Many people are having to take pay cuts to keep their jobs. I'd stay put.
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#72 of 87 Old 12-14-2008, 03:14 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Funny...since it is the weekend my husband took a few minutes to read this thread and pointed out that I have overstated how big of a jump it would be...

He pointed out that our current mortgage is actually about 40% of our take home pay since we have so much automatically deducted for savings. It would be 25% of our new take home pay. We currently never feel tight and feel like we have saved enough to take a break for a few years...

Anyway, I think consensus would probably still be that we shouldn't do it right now, but he pointed out that my math is fuzzy

straighthaircurly - I am with you in that we would rather have the home that we want than extra opportunities to eat out, buy stuff, etc. We aren't really consumers and only buy things we need, more because of who we are than because of $. We also have a ton of savings (probably because we don't enjoy spending money on anything except travel...)

Anyway, we are looking at some different options based on feedback here, but my husband agreed with several posters about the issue really being if the budget is doable rather than what % of our income it would be right now...
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#73 of 87 Old 12-14-2008, 08:21 PM
 
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In that case, if you have a lot of savings, I would consider doing this with a bigger down payment so that the mortgage payments would not exceed 25% of income.
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#74 of 87 Old 12-14-2008, 10:38 PM
 
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Have you considered Catholic School? I imagine the cost of living where you live (DC) is roughly comparable to where I live (Manhattan/NYC). Here private schools run $25,000-$35,000 a year, but Catholic schools are just a fraction of that in the $2,000-$7,000 range.

You do not have to be Catholic to attend. I'm a happy non-Catholic school graduate and I would guess that roughly 1/3 of the kids I went to school with also were not Catholic. It wasn't a big deal.

Here for the most part, the $25,000-$35,000 private schools are where the celebs and CEOs send their kids. The middle class use Catholic schools, and the lower class sends their kids to public schools.
Catholic high schools in my area are 15k+/year (one is $24k, I believe), which is better than $35k but still $$$.
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#75 of 87 Old 12-14-2008, 10:42 PM
 
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Holy Cow! Are you sure you're not looking at an independent PRIVATE school that just happens to offer Catholic religious instruction as opposed to a Catholic PAROCHIAL school connected to the archdiocese? There's a big difference. Here, independent schools with Catholic religious instruction are part of the New York State Association of Independent Schools while the Archdiocese (i.e. Catholic Church) runs the Parochial schools.

Here in NYC:

Cathedral High School (Parochial, Archdiocese) - Yearly tuition=$6,025
St. Jean Baptiste High School (Parochial, Archdiocese) - Yearly tuition=$6,450

Covent of the Sacred Heart (Independent, private school with Catholic Instruction, NOT connected to archdiocese) - Yearly tuition=$30,000.
Loyola High School (Independent, private school with Catholic Instruction, NOT connected to archdiocese) - Yearly tuition=$25,680

The Archdiocese here will advertise and promote all schools that provide a Catholic education, but they are only in charge of the Parochial ones. The private ones run themselves with no input from the Church with regards to curriculum. There is a HUGE price difference between the two.

In my non-Catholic opinion, the Catholic Church does an excellent job educating kids, far better than the city.

Hope I didn't get too complicated.
My husband and I both work for Catholic high schools (actually, one diocesan and one not) and there's a little misinformation here. What you're calling "private with Catholic instruction" are schools run by6 particular Catholic orders (so most definitely still Catholic schools). Loyola, for example, is a Catholic, Jesuit school.
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#76 of 87 Old 12-15-2008, 12:14 AM
 
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My husband and I both work for Catholic high schools (actually, one diocesan and one not) and there's a little misinformation here. What you're calling "private with Catholic instruction" are schools run by6 particular Catholic orders (so most definitely still Catholic schools). Loyola, for example, is a Catholic, Jesuit school.
There's no misinformation.

Loyola is an independent private school that is NOT run by the archdiocese. Admission is granted through ISEE/SSAT standardized testing, which is the same test used to determine admission to the other independent private schools that have no religious association, like Dalton, Horace Mann, and Riverdale Country Day. The ISEE/SSAT is also used to determine admissions to other PRIVATE schools with non-Catholic religious instruction. Trinity (EPOSCIPAL) requires it. Friends Seminary (Quaker) also requires it.

Admissions to the high schools that are part of the archdiocese is done through the COOP examination and the COOP is only used for Archdiocese Catholic School admission.

Religious orders has nothing to do with anything. St. Vincent Ferrer (CATHOLIC ARCHDIOCESE) is under the Dominican Order. Xavier High School (CATHOLIC ARCHDIOCESE) is under the Jesuit Order. Loyola High School, while Jesuit like Xavier, is NOT an archdiocese school run by the Catholic Church. It is an independent PRIVATE school.
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#77 of 87 Old 12-15-2008, 03:23 AM
 
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I still say research the scholarship aspect of private education.
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#78 of 87 Old 12-15-2008, 11:14 AM - Thread Starter
 
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That is very good advice, thanks! We will not be income qualified, but hopefully the kids will have some special talents that makes that an option.
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#79 of 87 Old 12-15-2008, 12:47 PM
 
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That is very good advice, thanks! We will not be income qualified, but hopefully the kids will have some special talents that makes that an option.
You may be surprised. Here, a household size of 2 with an income of up to $36,963 qualifies for an Archdiocese scholarship. As does a family size of 3 with incomes up to $46,359, a family size of 4 with incomes up to $55,755, and a family of 5 with incomes up to $65,151. Quite generous and based on income, not grades.

One of my cousins tried to do the private school route with her kid. She made about $30,000 a year and the schools she was applying to were $25,000-$35,000 a year. Kid got rejected from every school but one, which gave $20,000 in financial aid. Problem is, is that even with the aid, if you're making $30,000 you can't afford to pay $10,000 in tuition. Kid ended up in Archdiocese Catholic School with a financial need based scholarship.
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#80 of 87 Old 12-15-2008, 02:02 PM - Thread Starter
 
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DH and I have come up with a new plan :

Because of the COL in the area in which we live, saving enough to make a change in the downpayment isn't as realistic as saving enough to make up the change in monthly payment for the next several years. Since I am going to look for pt work we will save that money in a new account - we already have an emergency fund so this will be different. We will save enough money to make up for any difference in our monthly budget for at least two years. Hopefully we won't need it because we figured out a workable budget if I get a pt job for the estimated amount of a new mortgage. But this way we would have enough money stashed (minor emergency fund) to not have it be tight or tip into our emergency fund for several years even if something happened with my pt job. If dh lost his job, we would have the emergency fund. If we find the new mortgage to be no problem we can use that money to replace a car or dump into the kids college savings plan.

Anyway, I know I have posted a ton on this thread. I appreciate all the feedback, it has really helped us think through a reasonable plan. It is going to take us a bit longer to be ready to move, but it seems much less of a throwing caution to the wind scenario. Wish me luck - I am going to go and clean up my resume!

KateKat - thanks again, I will look into that option as well.
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#81 of 87 Old 12-15-2008, 02:10 PM
 
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There's no misinformation.

Loyola is an independent private school that is NOT run by the archdiocese. Admission is granted through ISEE/SSAT standardized testing, which is the same test used to determine admission to the other independent private schools that have no religious association, like Dalton, Horace Mann, and Riverdale Country Day. The ISEE/SSAT is also used to determine admissions to other PRIVATE schools with non-Catholic religious instruction. Trinity (EPOSCIPAL) requires it. Friends Seminary (Quaker) also requires it.

Admissions to the high schools that are part of the archdiocese is done through the COOP examination and the COOP is only used for Archdiocese Catholic School admission.

Religious orders has nothing to do with anything. St. Vincent Ferrer (CATHOLIC ARCHDIOCESE) is under the Dominican Order. Xavier High School (CATHOLIC ARCHDIOCESE) is under the Jesuit Order. Loyola High School, while Jesuit like Xavier, is NOT an archdiocese school run by the Catholic Church. It is an independent PRIVATE school.
A school does not have to be owned and operated by the Archdiocese to be Catholic. I don't think these schools would describe themselves as "private with Catholic instruction" regardless of which admissions exam they use (unless Catholic schools are much, much different on the east coast).
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#82 of 87 Old 12-15-2008, 02:18 PM
 
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There's no misinformation.

Loyola is an independent private school that is NOT run by the archdiocese. Admission is granted through ISEE/SSAT standardized testing, which is the same test used to determine admission to the other independent private schools that have no religious association, like Dalton, Horace Mann, and Riverdale Country Day. The ISEE/SSAT is also used to determine admissions to other PRIVATE schools with non-Catholic religious instruction. Trinity (EPOSCIPAL) requires it. Friends Seminary (Quaker) also requires it.

Admissions to the high schools that are part of the archdiocese is done through the COOP examination and the COOP is only used for Archdiocese Catholic School admission.

Religious orders has nothing to do with anything. St. Vincent Ferrer (CATHOLIC ARCHDIOCESE) is under the Dominican Order. Xavier High School (CATHOLIC ARCHDIOCESE) is under the Jesuit Order. Loyola High School, while Jesuit like Xavier, is NOT an archdiocese school run by the Catholic Church. It is an independent PRIVATE school.
Well, it does, actually. Either the school is owned and operated by that religious order (ie: the Jesuits, Franciscans, etc.) or it is owned and operated by the Archdiocese. I'm not sure how one earns the definition of a diocesan school in NY, but it would be unusual for a Jesuit school to fall in that definition since they are owned and governed by the local province.

I may be off base since I'm on the west coast, but I've worked in Jesuit schools for years and have never come across one that is considered diocesan. All have diocesan support and all Catholic schools have to obey the archbishop, but that's really a separate question.
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#83 of 87 Old 12-15-2008, 08:10 PM
 
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Well, it does, actually. Either the school is owned and operated by that religious order (ie: the Jesuits, Franciscans, etc.) or it is owned and operated by the Archdiocese. I'm not sure how one earns the definition of a diocesan school in NY, but it would be unusual for a Jesuit school to fall in that definition since they are owned and governed by the local province.

I may be off base since I'm on the west coast, but I've worked in Jesuit schools for years and have never come across one that is considered diocesan. All have diocesan support and all Catholic schools have to obey the archbishop, but that's really a separate question.


I'm not sure how many times I need to say this. NYC Catholic Schools are run by the Archdiocese (Catholic Church). "Catholic" schools not run by the Archdiocese are considered private schools. There is a big difference between the two and NYC parents who choose to send their kids to private schools with religious instruction are not walking around saying that their kids are in Catholic Schools. They're walking around saying their kids are in private schools, because NYC private schools have a prestige factor. NYC Catholic schools do not.

NYC private schools (including the privates with religious instruction) are home to celebrity kids, business mogul kids, and trust fund babies. NYC Catholic schools, while providing and excellent education are not. They offer very different things, offer very different educations, and have very different student bodies.
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#84 of 87 Old 12-15-2008, 08:28 PM
 
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A school does not have to be owned and operated by the Archdiocese to be Catholic. I don't think these schools would describe themselves as "private with Catholic instruction" regardless of which admissions exam they use (unless Catholic schools are much, much different on the east coast).
Yes it does. Otherwise it's a PRIVATE school with religious instruction and the private schools do describe themselves as such since they are marketing to a very different body than schools run by the archdiocese. Private schools under the NYS Independent School Association or ISAAGNY have a prestige factor that Catholic Archdiocese schools do not.

I've seen NYC private high schools that cost as much as $36,000 a year. They cater to the rich. Archdiocese schools do not. Both types of schools have hugely different offerings.

The Archdiocese recently got into hot water here because they closed down a middle class school and tried to reopen it as a type of Archdiocese "private" school with $30,000 tuition and private school amenities. They had 2 students in the ENTIRE school. People with an extra $30,000 or so to spend on high school or elementary school tuition rarely choose Archdiocese schools as the above illustrates. They absolutely would choose a PRIVATE school with religious instruction because there is a prestige factor.
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#85 of 87 Old 12-15-2008, 08:30 PM
 
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KateKat, just wanting to say you're making sense to me!
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#86 of 87 Old 12-16-2008, 03:38 PM
 
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Someone may have already mentioned this but, just try to remember that your monthly mortgage payments should never be more than 25% ( and for many that can be pushing it) than your net monthly income.

A lot of the trouble people are in these days is from paying upwards of 30% of there net income towards mortgages. I'd wait a bit before making your move.
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#87 of 87 Old 12-29-2008, 01:58 PM
 
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This has been interesting for me because we are house poor. But I don't regret it. Much.

Obviously ANYONE would like to have more funds to go out to eat, travel, do that weekend activity, indulge your kids a bit. We moved to a bigger house with updates a year ago. Our last house was old and small (one bedroom plus weird office space) with a smallish kitchen. I homeschool and we are home a lot. And I cook everything. Tortillas this morning, ketchup later today, stuff people often buy. So, to move to a bigger house with a bigger kitchen has made me happier, I must admit. I Love that my bigger kids can play while the toddler naps, I love counter space, I love a place to homeschool and put schoolwork. I love that I'm not freezing in the winter and burning up in the summer. I love that my family can come visit and stay with us instead of at a hotel. We've used our guest room every other month or so, sometimes for two weeks at a time. Saves THEM money, I guess!

At my last house, we had to have our entire house replumbed b/c the old pipes went. And then seven months later the gas lines went while it was on the market. Those worries are not looming with this house. Obviously nothing is guaranteed, but the chances are less here!

I occasionally get twinges when thinking about money because we'd love love love to travel more. And I have to really watch our food budget. Anyway, only you can tell what's right for your family. You just have to be sure because to be in a situation like that and feel regret is no fun.

Also, I went to Catholic high school in the DC area, catholic grade school in MD. I just HAVE to know which schools are charging that much!

Zia+Lane+Sonora=Mi Vida Loca! :
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