Buy in bulk/stock pile tribe - Page 7 - Mothering Forums
Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#181 of 360 Old 02-11-2009, 10:15 PM
 
katheek77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 4,285
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
As for where we store, we have an 825sq ft apt (finally looked up the footage). We keep most of our stash in the second bedroom closet (we co-sleep, and have all our clothing in the first bedroom). I have a five-shelf unit in the kitchen for items in use (flour, sugar, rice), spices, and every day items (vinegars, oils, etc).

I just bought 10 packages of Hebrew Nat'l Franks. I buy either those or Coleman. They were on sale for half price, and, knowing the way our store works, that means they'll be jacking the price up in the next couple of weeks (whenever meat goes on sale around here, 9/10 times, it means the price is rising). We store out of season and later years clothing (for DD) either under the bed, or in our 2x4 storage unit. I have my canning/drying equipment split between the kitchen and closet.

I also bought some "natural" (our store's version of nearly organic) ground beef. Same reason.

I also have about 15 lbs of assorted venison. I told the story somewhere else, but, the woman I nanny for had an arrowed deer wander into and die in their yard, I found it, they processed it, and we benefitted from, I guess, a finder's fee (they don't like the taste, but, some of their relatives do).

I've got beans soaking for beanie weenies (sorry, I love those), and making meat spaghetti sauce for the scads of pasta I got on clearance (DH and DD BOTH like the recipe, which is unusual). We are trying desperately to eat beets or apples at least every other dinner, with apples with our snacks. I'm still in the learning stages for some items, but, I apparently manifested the book on apple and beet preserving last year.
katheek77 is offline  
#182 of 360 Old 02-11-2009, 10:28 PM
 
Juvysen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Binghamton, NY
Posts: 7,479
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenelle View Post
After skimming 9 pages, I am pretty sure that I don't belong here after all. :

The only thing I have ever bought in a 50+lb. bag would be... Bird food. Water softener salt.

I am inspired by your ideas for organization though. We don't have much space, and it seems like even less because I am just plain not organized like I'd like to be. We've got a lot of clutter issues.
I don't think I've ever bought 50 lbs of anything except beef at one time. : I think it's ok if you only have the inclination to BIB/stockpile or you stockpile in other ways.

Jenna ~ mommy to Sophia Elise idea.gif  (1/06), Oliver Matthew  blahblah.gif (7/07) and Avery Michael fly-by-nursing1.gif(3/10)

 

dizzy.gif Wading slowly and nervously into this homeschooling thing.

Juvysen is offline  
#183 of 360 Old 02-11-2009, 10:30 PM
 
katheek77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 4,285
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenelle View Post
After skimming 9 pages, I am pretty sure that I don't belong here after all. :

The only thing I have ever bought in a 50+lb. bag would be... Bird food. Water softener salt.

I am inspired by your ideas for organization though. We don't have much space, and it seems like even less because I am just plain not organized like I'd like to be. We've got a lot of clutter issues.
The most I've ever bought is 25lbs of flour at one time. Because I get a discount and I know I will use it (although I do have more than 25lbs of a few items). I don't think you necessarily have to have humongous quantities of Item X to qualify. I remember reading that most people don't have a two week supply of food on hand. I think if you have a few months (of whatever, in whatever variety) you probably qualify.

I occassionally wonder about when my closet floor will break. And I don't think I have 50lbs of any one item on hand.
katheek77 is offline  
#184 of 360 Old 02-11-2009, 11:31 PM
 
SeekingJoy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 2,553
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Jenelle, this isn't my thread, but I am following it. I think all are welcome.

I don't have 50# of any one thing. Well, I didn't until this weekend. Store sale + coupon = 36 boxes of free pasta. Fortunately, we eat a lot of pasta.

I am loving the storage tips. We have a setup similar to Kathee's, and I can use all the ideas I can get to eek out a bit more room.

Happy wife to DH superhero.gifand mama to DS signcirc1.gif11/05 and DD energy.gif8/07.
SeekingJoy is offline  
#185 of 360 Old 02-12-2009, 02:25 AM
 
Jyotsna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Right here!
Posts: 1,472
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
What are all the various choices in canning equipment, and what would you choose if you only could choose one thing?

Vegetarian Hindu, mother to L,P and R. 
Jyotsna is offline  
#186 of 360 Old 02-12-2009, 10:42 AM
 
KariM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: at the sewing machine (in zone 5A)
Posts: 3,375
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jyotsna View Post
What are all the various choices in canning equipment, and what would you choose if you only could choose one thing?

If I could choose only one thing it would be a large capacity All American brand pressure canner. I have the 21.5 qt capacity canner, but wish we had purchased the 30 qt. size. We can can 19 pints or 7 quarts at once with ours, but with the 30 qt size I could can 14 quarts at once or 19 pints.

The pressure canner can be used for both pressure canning and water bath canning.

As for the various choices, there are two main methods of canning - water bath canning and pressure canner. Some folks use a steam canning system, but it's definitely a minority.

There are lots of associated gear, too! We, for instance, use a stock pot; an apple peeler/corer; a food strainer/sauce maker; and a water bath canner when we make applesauce. I also make sure to have on hand my funnels, jar lifter, and magnetic lid lifter.

Some other tools often used in canning are:

- jelly strainer
- steam juicers (for making jelly without a lot of work)
- bean frenchers
- pea shellers
- cherry stoner
- strawberry hullers
- pear corer
- corn cutters

Some of the best sources of canning information I've found are the Ball Blue Book and your local county extension service (for those in the US).
KariM is offline  
#187 of 360 Old 02-12-2009, 10:54 AM
 
KariM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: at the sewing machine (in zone 5A)
Posts: 3,375
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hazelnut View Post
Do some of you have a lot of space? Our home isn't really super small, but it's not big either. I usually find extra warm clothes cheap second hand and like having extras, but the minimalist in me keeps from buying ahead of sizes. Storing out of season ones is challenging enough for me. I know keeping it organized is key, but the more there is, the harder it is to organize. We have a sizable laundry room in the basement where I store stuff and sizable closets, but I just hate when they're stuffed, iykwim.

We have a 1200 square foot home built in the 1880s. Our basement was dug out by hand in the 1920s when the first furnace was installed. So...it has a REALLY low ceiling and it's not a full basement - part is crawl space and the kitchen doesn't have a basement below it because that was a 1920s addition also.

We store food in our kitchen pantries, in our basement on shelves, in large food grade storage buckets, and basically wherever we can fit it! We have two small chest freezers and the small freezer with our refrigerator. We also have a fridge in the garage, but that's not used during the deep winter as our garage is detached and unheated.

We have three closets in our house and they are filled to the max with our everyday clothing, stored supplies (soap, etc), and other items like baby gear, fabric/patterns/notions, and extra linens. We also use our attic a lot for the stored clothing. 3-4 times a year I go into the attic to pull out the next size up or to put away clothing that has been outgrown.

For organization of the clothing I use large clear plastic totes and print out two sheets with the size on it and place those on both ends of the box. It's easy to see what size clothing is in the box. Shoes are also stored this way.

Right now I'm only storing clothing for my two DDs so the gender is always female. Coats and snowpants are hung in my closet.

My DS is 17 and is probably at his adult size (more or less) so for him we just are sure to have extras on hand - more pants, extra coats, etc.

The other thing we do is make sure to have good quality boots and winter wear because that is our harshest season!

We have a floor to ceiling cabinet in our back hallway that stores lightbulbs, garden seed, trowels, boots, etc. We hung hooks to hang up coats and jackets.

What I have found is that we have to think creatively and in some cases build in storage options. In the 1880s folks didn't have a lot of clothing so we're kinda short on closet space from a modern perspective, but you can add in different types of storage at a low cost - like coat hooks along a wall, etc. We also use those over-the-door hanger things a LOT.

For my daughters' clothing storage we converted an old hutch into an armoire. It was a family piece that used to be in my great grandmother's kitchen. We added a closet rod and removed one shelf and the top part is now a closet and the bottom cabinet stores toys.
KariM is offline  
#188 of 360 Old 02-12-2009, 03:39 PM
 
lmonter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: My own private Idaho
Posts: 6,382
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by KariM View Post
If I could choose only one thing it would be a large capacity All American brand pressure canner. I have the 21.5 qt capacity canner, but wish we had purchased the 30 qt. size. We can can 19 pints or 7 quarts at once with ours, but with the 30 qt size I could can 14 quarts at once or 19 pints.
If you don't have a bad back or have to haul the canner up and down stairs every other day.
My 921 (the 21.5qt one?) is heavy enough for me, even when empty. No kitchen cabinet of ours is even close to big enough for our canners. Plus, I've found the only way I could even come close to needing room for 14 qts for pressure canning was when I had 5 gallons of green beans to deal with or made a triple batch of chicken/turkey stock. So for me, doing 7 quarts is fine (and you really can put 7 of those wide-mouth half-pints on the rack above the quarts to get more out of each session!).

Wife to an amazing hubby, mother hen to four chicken3.gif 
(If you're curious, 2003, 2006, 2008, 2010, and yes, it's a busy house)
lmonter is offline  
#189 of 360 Old 02-12-2009, 08:29 PM
 
Anguschick1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Up to my eyeballs in TF GFCFEF
Posts: 2,176
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Me, Me! I belong here! I've always bought in bulk, it's how I was raised to plan out purchases/grocery shop. When we went gfcfef I joined a food co-op to save money on bulk grains and other staples. My dad raises black angus so we get a side every year. Just spoke w/the processor yesterday, I can't wait to go pick it up! We have one chest freezer (meat) and one standard fridge (veggies/fruits in that freezer) in the basement. Another fridge upstairs. (Stock makings and containers of items "in use" as well as premade meals in that freezer)

I have a pressure canner (American brand, 21.5qt, I believe) but when I've tried to can stock w/it the jars leak and it turns into a *huge* mess. Perhaps I was inadvertantly reusing lids? I don't think so - what else could cause that? I also water bath can jellies, pesto, tomato products, jams, apple stuff, things like that.

In our basement utility room I have metal shelving that houses all my stuffs. Then 3 5-gallon buckets w/air tight, screw on lids that I store my sorghum, millet and brown rice in. Buckwheat is in another container. I have a grain mill to mill my own flour in usuable quantities (around 4-8 cups of raw material that I grind weekly usually) and that is stored in glass jars in the kitchen.

Large stockpots/canning pots are in a slide out under our basement stairs. Jars/lids/rings are in boxes on shelves under the stairs. Various cooking things, specialty baking pans, serving dishes, crock pots are on more metal shelves in the utility room.

I have one bin of clothing for each size. (0-6 month, 9-12month, 18month etc) But as we're putting baby-making on hold for a couple of years I want to pare that down.

Having a nicely stocked pantry/freezer saves me time/energy/hair by not having to run out to the store w/the littles and really gives me a sense of peace and stability.
Anguschick1 is offline  
#190 of 360 Old 02-13-2009, 06:38 AM
 
Jyotsna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Right here!
Posts: 1,472
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
For those who store all of their canning, extra clothing and more in the basement (or attic) what provisions do you have for times when there is no electricity? If there are no windows, how will you find your lentils, barley and rice ect?

Vegetarian Hindu, mother to L,P and R. 
Jyotsna is offline  
#191 of 360 Old 02-13-2009, 08:27 AM
 
velochic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Dreaming of the Bavarian Alps
Posts: 8,413
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jyotsna View Post
For those who store all of their canning, extra clothing and more in the basement (or attic) what provisions do you have for times when there is no electricity? If there are no windows, how will you find your lentils, barley and rice ect?
Flashlight? Candle? We also have several kerosene lamps with gallons of fuel, extra wicks, etc.

It's more than just how do you find them... it's how do you cook them? You have to have alternative fuel sources if you are not on propane or natural gas with a gas stove.

ETA: I guess it would help to mention some alternative forms of cooking. We use our woodburning stove (both to cook on and bake in) during the winter, even when the power isn't out. In the summer... solar oven, grill with a burner on the side and camp stove. I also have several little "home made" cooking sources that I made just fool around with and see how they work. I have a few pepsi can stoves and a hobo stove that I made. I would only use those as a last resort, though, but they are fun to make and try to cook on for practice. I use sterno for the hobo stove and denatured alcohol for the pepsi can stove.
velochic is offline  
#192 of 360 Old 02-13-2009, 08:55 AM
 
saintmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 1,154
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I guess I belong here.We have:
2 freezers in the garage, one venison and farm raised chicken,one veggies
2 refrigerators one for processing meat, one for veggies, eggs, goat milk
8 5 gal buckets for storing grain
Floor to ceiling shelves in the utility room for canned stuff.
We shop at Sams-they have the BIG sizes.
saintmom is offline  
#193 of 360 Old 02-13-2009, 09:53 AM
 
Juvysen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Binghamton, NY
Posts: 7,479
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
We have a woodburning stove that presumably I'd be able to cook on, but I haven't tried. Also, our grill is charcoal, so we would probably use that.

Jenna ~ mommy to Sophia Elise idea.gif  (1/06), Oliver Matthew  blahblah.gif (7/07) and Avery Michael fly-by-nursing1.gif(3/10)

 

dizzy.gif Wading slowly and nervously into this homeschooling thing.

Juvysen is offline  
#194 of 360 Old 02-13-2009, 10:51 AM - Thread Starter
 
Amys1st's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 8,449
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anguschick1 View Post
My dad raises black angus so we get a side every year. Just spoke w/the processor yesterday, I can't wait to go pick it up! We have one chest freezer (meat) and one standard fridge (veggies/fruits in that freezer) in the basement. Another fridge upstairs. (Stock makings and containers of items "in use" as well as premade meals in that freezer)

I have one bin of clothing for each size. (0-6 month, 9-12month, 18month etc) But as we're putting baby-making on hold for a couple of years I want to pare that down.

Having a nicely stocked pantry/freezer saves me time/energy/hair by not having to run out to the store w/the littles and really gives me a sense of peace and stability.
Your Dad sounds like a great guy to have around DH was thrilled when you went GF last year, It took us weeks to use up that flour!

Baby making on hold? Dosent bother me, but I have yet another load of clothing for your bin.

and...

Who has to rearrange their bulk or organized clothing etc because of a life style change etc? Such as- I pare down outgrown clothing every 4-6 mos and of course give away since we are done w the baby making/nursing and now officially done w cloth diapering and the occasional pull up.

I have noticed we have changed what we buy etc over the years. DD1 would not and will not eat crackers or anything like that for snack. Where as DD2 loves crackers, goldfish crackers etc (much to my chagrin). The good news she also likes fruits etc but now I keep these on hand. DD1 has this thing for hamburgers right now- luckily I have about 75 lbs of hamburger but then DD2 would prefer to have a new york strip right along w us!

"The true joy of life is the trip. The station is only a dream. It constantly out distances us."
Amys1st is offline  
#195 of 360 Old 02-13-2009, 10:54 AM
 
KariM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: at the sewing machine (in zone 5A)
Posts: 3,375
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jyotsna View Post
For those who store all of their canning, extra clothing and more in the basement (or attic) what provisions do you have for times when there is no electricity? If there are no windows, how will you find your lentils, barley and rice ect?
We have a window in the attic (they used to build them for ventilation) and we also have many windows in the basement.

But like velochic stated, finding the stuff is honestly the least of your concerns when facing an extended power outage.

We have a gas stove that can be manually lit to cook on (assuming we still have natural gas flow). In the event that isn't an option we then plan to use our propane camping stove (we store propane as well). We also have plans for a solar oven and an small stove that uses alchohol as the fuel (this one doesn't produce carbon monoxide either).
KariM is offline  
#196 of 360 Old 02-13-2009, 11:15 AM
 
katheek77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 4,285
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amys1st View Post
Who has to rearrange their bulk or organized clothing etc because of a life style change etc? Such as- I pare down outgrown clothing every 4-6 mos and of course give away since we are done w the baby making/nursing and now officially done w cloth diapering and the occasional pull up.

I have noticed we have changed what we buy etc over the years. DD1 would not and will not eat crackers or anything like that for snack. Where as DD2 loves crackers, goldfish crackers etc (much to my chagrin). The good news she also likes fruits etc but now I keep these on hand. DD1 has this thing for hamburgers right now- luckily I have about 75 lbs of hamburger but then DD2 would prefer to have a new york strip right along w us!
Well, we're only having the one babe, more than likely, so, I'm always rearranging. She made it out of diapers about 2 weeks after I gave away all her 12mos clothing (she's tiny), and still half her 18mos pants are too big (but she needs a 2T-3T on top - long torso). So, I have 2/3T summer clothes under the bed right now, 3T winter clothes under the bed (I'll put some of her 2T winter clothes under when the season is over). Then, we get handmedowns, so, I have 4T-6x down in the basement storage cage (apt). I go through each season, and try to decide what to do - problem is, Katie grows in spurts (for example, she went from 12/18mos tops to large 2T-small 3T over two months). So, I usually save until the next year's season, just to be sure). Then I just give away whatever doesn't fit. Same with toys - although she helps me pick that stuff out "to give to dee udder babies!"

The other problem is my DD goes through phases with food. She's not "picky" per se, but, she'll go on a run where she eats yogurt for breakfast for 2 weeks straight. But, then she's "off" yogurt, and on pancakes or eggs or grilled cheese. She's a pretty good eater, but, yeah, she'll go on "runs" with particular foods, and you can't keep it in the house in sufficient quantities.

I'm not going to even discuss how our eating habits have changed since having a baby. :-p I still cooked a lot before having her, but, not as healthy.
katheek77 is offline  
#197 of 360 Old 02-19-2009, 08:28 PM
 
Sk8ermaiden's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 1,294
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
So, I've been watching your tribe for awhile. I've just quit my job, as baby is on the way, and the budget with just DH's income is going to be very tight. I like the idea of buying in bulk to save money and have a little extra on hand.

However, I am having a little trouble grasping this mentally. My husband is not likely to lose his job (knock on wood), we do not believe the world is ending and we won't be able to get groceries. Really for us, the most sensible reason for stockpiling is hurricanes.

But that's my thing. I would LOVE to be prepared for a hurricane in the future. Currently our preparedness is to make sure we've got batteries, candles and extra propane tanks.

However, now that I have lived through the aftermath of a hurricane with no power, I don't know what to buy. We did not want to bake bread or cook full normal meals over a small grill in August with no AC in Texas. We wanted fruit, lunchmeat sandwiches, snack cakes, hot dogs - I was making egg scrambles in the mornings to use up our eggs...things that were easy and that (except for the fruit) I generally consider crap and don't keep much of around - plus it's perishable.

I am almost thinking that maybe stockpiling isn't for us? It almost seems like running to the store when the hurricane is coming may be the better way for us.

Of course, I do want to get at least a couple weeks of staples saved up, just in case something happens where they can't get stores open (after Ike they really moved mountains to have stores up and running in 2-3 days) and we HAVE to cook normal stuff.

Thanks for letting me think out loud in your thread. I don't know anyone IRL I could discuss this with.

I'm Kellie :, married to Chris , and mom to one baby girl (7/12/09).
Sk8ermaiden is offline  
#198 of 360 Old 02-22-2009, 07:10 PM - Thread Starter
 
Amys1st's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 8,449
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
bumping since this seems to be the raving about on this forum and we have some ?s that need to be answered.

"The true joy of life is the trip. The station is only a dream. It constantly out distances us."
Amys1st is offline  
#199 of 360 Old 02-22-2009, 08:24 PM
 
krankedyann's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Buried in recipes in Asheville, NC
Posts: 2,406
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sk8ermaiden View Post
I am almost thinking that maybe stockpiling isn't for us? It almost seems like running to the store when the hurricane is coming may be the better way for us.
Stockpiling is a good financial strategy to save money, even if you take the 'emergency preparedness' idea out of it completely. I know a gob of folks who do this and never think the first thing about emergency preparedness.

Have you ever read the book Tightwad Gazette by Amy Dacyczyn? She does the stockpile by buying only on sale and buying enough to get you through to the next sale. The first time I did this consistently, I dropped my grocery budget by 30% in 6 months. That freed up more income for other things. I didn't even hear about emergency preparedness until 8 years later.

The key is to only stock up on items you'd normally by, use what you have, and be flexible on brands if you can, due to being able to take advantage of more sales opportunities.

KerryAnn @ CookingTF dot com - Nutrient dense foods your kids will LOVE!  Real Food Cooking School and Lactofermentation Classes now live! Use coupon code "CTF" for 20% off.

krankedyann is offline  
#200 of 360 Old 02-22-2009, 08:29 PM
 
Hazelnut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 3,349
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I was having some of the same thoughts myself, sk8termaiden. I think the overwhelming nature of it doesn't help me much. It's not something I went to spend too much time or money on. I always thought that in some disasters, wouldn't one leave anyway? Although my main goal would be in case of a job loss, and I'm not entirely giving up the idea of stockpiling more. At any rate, all I am planning on at this point is adding a bit to the amount of food I keep around (which would likely just last a short while in the even of a storm or something). I've never been an empty-pantry gal-though it's probably 'empty' compared to these bulk buyers. We will also probably buy another freezer too b/c my dh really wants to get a cow share.

The other thing for me, is focusing on more self-sufficiency. I'm in the suburbs of a big city and won't be living off the grid with my own goats any time soon (though I admire those who do) but we just moved and I am very eager to get a garden going, learn to can, etc. I'm a novice but I have knowledgeable help, and one has to start somewhere!

krankeedyan, the buy on sale thing is really tripping me up the most. I buy at trader joe's, sometimes costco- I compare prices a lot, buy in bulk when it's cheaper to do so (like costco bulk), and I have in the past gotten produce through a local delivery that was pretty decently priced. I feel like I aim for cheapness by making things from scratch as much as possible (also seems more self sufficient to me, even without the 6 month supply of flour). But I guess I don't see great sales on produce, on organic milk, etc. I usually see sales on junky food, and I know you guys aren't buying that. What kind of sales are you finding? Am I hitting the wrong stores or something? I find our Dominicks more expesnive than whole foods with some items, so I don't always pay attention to sales there.
Hazelnut is offline  
#201 of 360 Old 02-22-2009, 08:32 PM
 
krankedyann's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Buried in recipes in Asheville, NC
Posts: 2,406
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Juvysen View Post
We have a woodburning stove that presumably I'd be able to cook on, but I haven't tried. Also, our grill is charcoal, so we would probably use that.
My husband came home recently to announce that his company laid off half of their employees, and the other half (including him) would be receiving a 20% pay cut AND a reduction in hours for at least two months, maybe longer. IF the company stays open. It has dropped my food budget to $125 a month, and we have food allergies to contend with! I also had to immediately figure out how to drop my electricity budget $30 a month. And I had already given up the dryer!

So I have spent the last two weeks or so learning to cook on my woodstove. It's super easy once you get the hang of it. Get a cast iron trivet and griddle. The trivet will keep things warm but not cooking, and the griddle will reduce from a boil to a simmer on a very hot stove. I got mine off of eBay. I also took an old toaster oven and took off all of the plastic parts and cut the cord. I can now sit it on top of the woodstove and use it to bake. It requires a hot stove (1000+ with the catalytic combustor on) and it takes about twice as long, but it works!

I've recently been able to avoid using my stovetop and oven for as much as several days at a time. It does have a learning curve to figure out what temperatures are required and how to manipulate the heat, but now every single breakfast, most lunches and about half of my dinners are done on top of my woodstove.

KerryAnn @ CookingTF dot com - Nutrient dense foods your kids will LOVE!  Real Food Cooking School and Lactofermentation Classes now live! Use coupon code "CTF" for 20% off.

krankedyann is offline  
#202 of 360 Old 02-22-2009, 09:17 PM
 
Juvysen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Binghamton, NY
Posts: 7,479
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by krankedyann View Post
My husband came home recently to announce that his company laid off half of their employees, and the other half (including him) would be receiving a 20% pay cut AND a reduction in hours for at least two months, maybe longer. IF the company stays open. It has dropped my food budget to $125 a month, and we have food allergies to contend with! I also had to immediately figure out how to drop my electricity budget $30 a month. And I had already given up the dryer!

So I have spent the last two weeks or so learning to cook on my woodstove. It's super easy once you get the hang of it. Get a cast iron trivet and griddle. The trivet will keep things warm but not cooking, and the griddle will reduce from a boil to a simmer on a very hot stove. I got mine off of eBay. I also took an old toaster oven and took off all of the plastic parts and cut the cord. I can now sit it on top of the woodstove and use it to bake. It requires a hot stove (1000+ with the catalytic combustor on) and it takes about twice as long, but it works!

I've recently been able to avoid using my stovetop and oven for as much as several days at a time. It does have a learning curve to figure out what temperatures are required and how to manipulate the heat, but now every single breakfast, most lunches and about half of my dinners are done on top of my woodstove.
Wow, that's awesome!

Jenna ~ mommy to Sophia Elise idea.gif  (1/06), Oliver Matthew  blahblah.gif (7/07) and Avery Michael fly-by-nursing1.gif(3/10)

 

dizzy.gif Wading slowly and nervously into this homeschooling thing.

Juvysen is offline  
#203 of 360 Old 02-23-2009, 12:18 AM
 
Ianthe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Logan, Utah
Posts: 6,808
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I found a co op today that is a non-profit org who sells dented food for almost cost (she said they add .05 to .10 to the price). We probably got $300-400 worth of food for $130! Lots of organic olive oil, walnut oil, crackers, canned veggies, vinegars, cookies, they even had margatrita mixer (although we didn't get any) .. oh and my favorite buy- organic spaghetti for 50 cents a package!! I wanted to buy 100 of them, but I think I got about 15 or so.

stillheart.gif The Hippie & the Marine stillheart.gif  hh2.gif
My boys: S (4) & O (2) & Expecting #3 in Dec. 2011

Ianthe is offline  
#204 of 360 Old 02-23-2009, 12:45 AM
 
Hazelnut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 3,349
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
wow! Was that in person or online?
Hazelnut is offline  
#205 of 360 Old 02-23-2009, 01:01 AM
 
Ianthe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Logan, Utah
Posts: 6,808
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hazelnut View Post
wow! Was that in person or online?
in person.. it's just a little warehouse. They do have a website though that locals can order online: www.utahcoop.org

stillheart.gif The Hippie & the Marine stillheart.gif  hh2.gif
My boys: S (4) & O (2) & Expecting #3 in Dec. 2011

Ianthe is offline  
#206 of 360 Old 02-24-2009, 08:08 PM
 
crunchy_mama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Missouri
Posts: 5,968
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
LizzyQ- what a great place- we have the run of the mill salvage stores and I always find great deals on organic stuff- it seems where I am at they don't know what they have!

I have a question for the gf stockpilers'. We are relatively new to this so I haven't stocked up on anything yet except pasta as I was waiting to see for sure what Luke liked- although I cook gf/cf/sf for the whole house. Anyway, he loves the Rice and Shine cereal- but it is outrageous at the HFS- so I was trying to find some online- I found a pretty decent deal for a case- but I was wondering the ingredients are just whole brown rice grits- So- I was wondering if there was anywhere cheaper to buy that just not under the Arrowhead Mills brand name- my preliminary searches haven't came up with much- one place but it was actually more expensive. We tried gf oats, but he still reacts to those and I love to have a hot cereal on hand for an easy breakfast. I have the Bob's Mighty Tasty- but we haven't tried it yet- so not sure if he likes it. I guess just plain corn grits is something to consider- or maybe grinding my own rice- but I don't have a grinder and not exactly sure what a rice grit is- sounds like I need to do some googling!

Anyway- I am also curious as to the stockpile lists of those on special diets- just for curiosity- I think I have a fair handle of things we are using- but as I said we are relatively new to this(less than a year). I don't do a lot of baking- maybe a couple of times a month or so and like to use coconut or almond flour- although I have yet to see coconut flour recipes w/o eggs and I worry if I wasn't to have access to them (I am not sure if egg replacer would work well w/ it or not). Anyway, besides that I use some sorghum flour and potato starch but that is mostly it- I am not a fan of bean or rice flours.

Happily Married to my : 11 yrs- Mama to wild-eyed monkey boy 7-04, fiery little girl 4-07, and the happy smiley baby that sleeps 11-09!
crunchy_mama is offline  
#207 of 360 Old 02-24-2009, 08:25 PM
 
Ianthe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Logan, Utah
Posts: 6,808
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
crunchy_mama- I have a quinoa hot cereal that is OK.. have you ever tried that?

stillheart.gif The Hippie & the Marine stillheart.gif  hh2.gif
My boys: S (4) & O (2) & Expecting #3 in Dec. 2011

Ianthe is offline  
#208 of 360 Old 02-25-2009, 10:56 PM
 
Leta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Ishpeming, MI
Posts: 3,602
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've thought a lot about why I stockpile food. It's a lot of things:

-DH was raised that way, and he has encouraged/enabled me.

-We never had anything in the house growing up. We were endlessly out of milk, tp, bread, toothpaste- this, despite someone going to the store every day or every other day. We rarely run out of anything. I love that.

- Even more from my childhood: The fridge never got cleaned out, we had a chest freezer that had nothing in it, ever, except for my dad's stash and my cousin's plancenta. And we had a beautiful basement laundry room filled with cabinets that were... empty. As well as a HUUGE bathroom closet that could have so easily been stocked with toiletries that was always... empty. Even at the time, that seemed like a waste to me.

-The Long Winter. Seriously, have you read this book? I bet I read it two dozen times as a kid, and I reread it last night. Holy $h!t. Toward the end, when they had nothing else left but some baking soda, they lived on two bushels of wheat for six weeks. A family of six. Can you imagine? I think this had a profound effect on my psyche. I mean, for God's sake, feeding your three year old hot tea and bread and nothing else for months? We would at least have peanut butter and canned tomatoes.

Trying to turn hearts and minds toward universal healthcare, one post at a time.
Leta is offline  
#209 of 360 Old 02-26-2009, 01:19 AM
 
mouso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,180
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
subbing.

Used to have decent storage, I am again trying to build it up since we have a bit of extra cash but uncertain employment in the future.
I love reading all of your ideas and such.

My mom was visiting and remarked that I had a lot of food (I seriously didn't- maybe two weeks, maybe, eating random things). All I could think was "How can you have so little in your house?!"

It just makes me feel good to see a full pantry and know that our bellies will be full. You all inspired me to take stock and complete reorganize the pantry today. I now have an idea of what I need to get a couple of months, at least, going again.

Mama to a sweet 12/06 girl fairy.gif and a squishy 8/09 boy biggrinbounce.gif
mouso is offline  
#210 of 360 Old 02-26-2009, 02:25 AM
 
Ianthe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Logan, Utah
Posts: 6,808
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I swear.. the subject of stockpiling is everywhere I go. Even tonight in my sociology class our prof. dedicated the whole class to discussing food storage, global and local catastrophes and the effect it could have on society. It was an interesting class...

stillheart.gif The Hippie & the Marine stillheart.gif  hh2.gif
My boys: S (4) & O (2) & Expecting #3 in Dec. 2011

Ianthe is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off