How educated are the ppl around you IRL? - Page 3 - Mothering Forums

View Poll Results: How educated are the people in your life?
almost everyone we know has a 4 year degree or higher 199 56.86%
many of my friends/family have 4 year degrees or are working on one 77 22.00%
only a few have degrees but most are financially secure/stable 37 10.57%
only a few have degrees but we're all struggling financially 20 5.71%
other, cause i know i didn't cover all possible scenarios! 17 4.86%
Voters: 350. You may not vote on this poll

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#61 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 12:03 AM
 
Emmeline II's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 8,817
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krystal323 View Post
Really? Well that sounds nice! Around here, the city councils seem to think that we don't need industry, big corporations, etc here--because we have the military (both single soldiers and military families) to make the local economy boom.
I'm in San Antonio; our city council appears proactive at courting businesses to move here. One recently moved it's headquarters from another Texas town to here; it appears we've been BRAC'd enough to not rely 100% on the military.

I came across this site that has information on our economy.

"It should be a rule in all prophylactic work that no harm should ever be unnecessarily inflicted on a healthy person (Sir Graham Wilson, The Hazards of Immunization, 1967)."
Emmeline II is offline  
#62 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 12:04 AM
 
lil_earthmomma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 2,446
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
No one in my bubble has anything past highschool. Many do not even have a high school diploma.

I constantly get told that I use big fancy words, like "illicit". sigh

I am a university student, have a college diploma and love the printed word with a passion that sometimes borders on obsession! But in this tiny logging village, I am a snobby bookworm "know-it-all", on top of being a hippie bfing freak!

I am not crunchy enough for this forum. Everyday I get a little crunchier though! :
lil_earthmomma is offline  
#63 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 12:17 AM
 
misswerewolf's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 364
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by lemongrass View Post
There doesn't seem to be much correlation between education and financial stability in the people I personally know.
Really? That's funny. I find the complete opposite to be true. One example: I have a college degree. My sister does not. My circle of friends differs drastically from my sister's circle of friends. No one in my circle is struggling financially at all. There was one gal who lost her job, and spent about a month traveling and having a grand ol' time. She was not looking for a job; yet when she returned stateside, a friend of hers handed her a cushy position at a start-up. My sister's friends, on the other hand, are ALL struggling.

Quote:
Originally Posted by p1gg1e View Post
My side though tends to be the nerdy type so even if we don't go to school we are extremely proficient in what we "do" and a degree would be a waste of time employment wise.

[...]

I don't see degrees as a rating of how well off someone is though. Wish the poll asked if the educated were secure or not like the "uneducated" side was.
I'm finding this thread somewhat offensive.
I don't think OP meant to offend with this poll. I too have wondered about the educational level of MDC users.

Also, when I made the decision to go to school, I did so because I wanted to be formally educated. There is something to be said for classical education, and I'm quite the fan. Employment considerations did not play a role, which was also the case for many of my friends. We didn't go to university to become successful (and, really, you can't do much with a degree in Liberal Arts, Humanities, or Classical Studies!).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Krystal323 View Post
And while it's not that the lack of education accounts for the way they are--it IS true that their worldview and opportunities would very likely be enhanced by education! Does that make sense?
I find this to be very true. Absolutely!
misswerewolf is offline  
#64 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 01:09 AM
 
Kristine233's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Way Northern MN
Posts: 4,154
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Is there a big snubbing of people with 2 year degrees vs 4 years? I'm curious as everyone is referring to 4 year degree and then "uneducated". So does a person with a 2 year degree fall into the uneducated category?

I, personally, do not have any IRL friends with degrees of any sort. I have one cousin and one co-worker that I know of with degrees. I was the first (and only) of my family to go to college. Actually, I'm going back for my 3rd time starting this June, and so is DH. I've just changed my mind on what I want to do that many times, lol. We bought a house and paid off two vehicles before I even started college (with the exception of my one year I did at age 17 that I don't count, lol - I partied far too much). Neither Dh or I had a degree yet we were financially stable. (that wasn't always the case, but hard work prevailed)

My grandparents owned a business and retired comfortably, degreeless. My dad owned his own business and was living comfortably (degreeless) until he had a horrible accident that put him in ICU and he lost it during that time. Pretty uncontrollable circumstances though. My aunt and her fiance own a business. I could go on and on really.

On the contrary, Dh's sister and brother both got degrees and aren't doing anything that they had planned and do struggle more. FIL also has a degree (4 year?) but didn't use it for most of his career. He's now retired from his job that was totally unrelated to his degree and didn't require one and they are living comfortably. They struggled when he was working in his field that the degree was sought in and had to have 3 jobs to support his family.

So, IMO, having or not having doesn't make much of a difference in stability or where you are at. Everyone I'm close with is very educated, but not necessarily holding any form of degree or higher education.

Dh and I are both going back to school but we are big believers in just doing what feels right and what you'd enjoy, the rest will fall into place. It just so happens that the new careers we both chose will require degrees (or in my case, a different one) but that has no bearing on whether or not we will be successful and stable.

Mom to Joscelyne 14, Andrew 12, and Mackenzie 10 and wife to Nate.
Kristine233 is offline  
#65 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 01:17 AM
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 1,670
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I live in a college town and the coffee barista has a masters and your doula has a phd.
flowers is offline  
#66 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 01:26 AM
 
lil_earthmomma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 2,446
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I forgot to add that over 90% of my village is unemployed right now because the wood mill that supports everyone is on shut down.

I wish more of my peers would see that furthering their education would open more doors to them.

Education is never wasted, even if you don't end up working in the field you study.

I am not crunchy enough for this forum. Everyday I get a little crunchier though! :
lil_earthmomma is offline  
#67 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 01:37 AM
 
LynnS6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Pacific NW longing for the Midwest
Posts: 12,565
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I am NOT a good person to be in this poll because I'm a professor. Everyone I work with has a Ph.D., and most of my students are getting their MA!

That being said, I'm come from a family of teachers, so everyone has 4 year degrees in my immediate family. I can only think of 3-4 of my 33 first cousins on my mom's side who don't have 4 year degrees. On my dad's side of the family it's a very different story -- only one of those cousins has a 4 year degree, and their lives are very very different from ours.

The thing about a 4 year degree is that it opens doors that are completely closed to you otherwise. It often shows people that you can start and finish a program, and that you have some basic writing/thinking skills. A 2 year degree definitely does not have the same 'value' as a 4 year degree, unless you're in a trade (e.g., plumbing, electrician), most places want a 4 year degree.

There IS a difference (from an educational standpoint) of what my sophomores can do and what my seniors can do. The sophomores generally don't write as well, don't think as deeply and are not terribly good independent learners. There are always exceptions, but really, there is a qualitative difference between 2 years of post high school education and 4, at least from the side of the professors.

If someone doesn't want a 4 year university degree, then I would strongly encourage learning a trade - we'll always need plumbers, auto mechanics, etc, and people who work in these areas often do quite well. Not everyone needs to go to college, but everyone needs some training!

Lynnteapot2.GIF, academicreading.gif,geek.gif wife, WOHM  to T jog.gif(4/01) and M whistling.gif (5/04)
LynnS6 is offline  
#68 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 01:40 AM
 
LynnS6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Pacific NW longing for the Midwest
Posts: 12,565
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Oh, and I wanted to add:

There's good reason to think that MDC users are better educated (formally or informally) than most people. Let's fact it, it's a form of communication that depends on the written word, and you need to have access to a computer and an internet connection to be a member. While these things can be had at a library, how many people do that?

Lynnteapot2.GIF, academicreading.gif,geek.gif wife, WOHM  to T jog.gif(4/01) and M whistling.gif (5/04)
LynnS6 is offline  
#69 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 02:07 AM - Thread Starter
 
Krystal323's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: In a world of dreams
Posts: 3,394
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
RE: 2-year degrees--While I literally *just* finished my AA in Commercial Art (yay me!! , i do agree with what LynnS6 says about the differences between sophmores and seniors in general. Not that a 2-year is worthless, far from it--but i think most people today see a 2-year as either a stepping stone to a 4 year program or a trade degree. I suppose commercial art can be viewed as a trade....?

i know i will be looked upon more favorably by a potential employer if i can put down AA instead of "some college". that reality used to really p!$$ me off, but i guess i've learned that constant swimming upstream tends to only make you weary, and drains your resources

I work at a college (in-classroom diability support), and there is a world of difference between the students and the few professors with PhDs. Even those with Master's vs. those with PhDs, there is a *something* that is different--I can't even put my finger on it, but if i had to spend my lunch break chatting with a professor, i'd seek out the ones that happen to have the PhDs!

Re: the 90% unemployment in your town, lil earthmomma, that makes me ill to even think about. I'm so sorry.

FWIW of course i never meant for this thread to be offensive to anyone, and i truly hope it's not coming across that way! I'm sad that what used to be "higher education" is now code for "necessary education". I'm sad that America by and large assigns respect to people based on how much their net worth is. And most of all, I'm sad that it seems to be true more and more that it's impossible to be financially secure without that "higher education"--especially when it costs $200G on average

Freethinking Earth-mama of five. uc.jpg

Krystal323 is offline  
#70 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 02:08 AM
 
Ruthie's momma's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Monument, Colorado
Posts: 1,268
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I selected the first option (most everyone I know has at least a 4-year degree or higher). Plus, I don't know of anyone who is struggling financially.

Libby blahblah.gif, momma to my precious little girl (6/29/07) 
                        and wonderful little man (12/1/10)

Ruthie's momma is offline  
#71 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 02:15 AM - Thread Starter
 
Krystal323's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: In a world of dreams
Posts: 3,394
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruthie's momma View Post
Plus, I don't know of anyone who is struggling financially.
Really?? NO one?? You must live in some other wonderful dimension--that sounds truly divine... :

Everyone I know, with the exception of one couple, is struggling--some terribly. I can't even imagine a circle of friends in which financial struggle was not a regular topic of conversation

Freethinking Earth-mama of five. uc.jpg

Krystal323 is offline  
#72 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 03:27 AM
 
tryingforbaby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 240
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiromamma View Post
I live in a city that is considered one of the "most educated cities in the country"...meaning we have a large perecentage of folks with Bachelor's degrees or higher. Most of the folks I know have graduate degrees, even the guys that pull my espresso at the coffee bar!


I voted that all have 4 year of working on it. Some do have 2 year.

I work at Starbucks and everyone either has a degree or is working on it. some Masters there too. Hubby and I are working on degrees. Mine 4 year, His is undecided. When we returned to college after being out 10 years, 3 friends fallowed suit!

I am the youngest of 9. 1 Graduate (Navel contractor), 2 (Parole officer and Engineer)4 year, 2 2 year (bank manager and manafacturing) 2 working on 4 year (sista, international business and me Elementry Ed .. never plan to teach outside home) 1 Navy Chief... oh and 3 classes away from a Bachelors but plans to get a Mastors before retirment... he oly lakes classes when he is out to sea, means he sleeps no more then 3 hours a day! and the last 1 hard working disable adult.

Out parents:
Mom: 2 year degree, hair stylist.... used for 6 months
Dad: 2 year degree, home designer have used for over 30 years
Step dad: 6 month degree in scubidiving..... hasn't used since he was 29 but he makes over $200,000 in sales
StepMom: Masters, CFO at a resort went to school when she turned 37. She and her sister went together.
tryingforbaby is offline  
#73 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 03:33 AM
 
tryingforbaby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 240
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hubby and I will make way less with our degrees then if we would have keep our orininal jobs. Hubby was a truck driver.... worked way too much. I was in sales... hated being to to sell crap along with the goods.
tryingforbaby is offline  
#74 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 04:25 AM
 
That Is Nice's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 7,036
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by LynnS6 View Post
The thing about a 4 year degree is that it opens doors that are completely closed to you otherwise. It often shows people that you can start and finish a program, and that you have some basic writing/thinking skills. A 2 year degree definitely does not have the same 'value' as a 4 year degree, unless you're in a trade (e.g., plumbing, electrician), most places want a 4 year degree.

There IS a difference (from an educational standpoint) of what my sophomores can do and what my seniors can do. The sophomores generally don't write as well, don't think as deeply and are not terribly good independent learners. There are always exceptions, but really, there is a qualitative difference between 2 years of post high school education and 4, at least from the side of the professors.

If someone doesn't want a 4 year university degree, then I would strongly encourage learning a trade - we'll always need plumbers, auto mechanics, etc, and people who work in these areas often do quite well. Not everyone needs to go to college, but everyone needs some training!

:

I totally agree. This is what my counselors told me in high school, and my academic advisors also said in college. It's what I found when I landed my first job, and it's been constant ever since with jobs after the first.

The paragraph about thinking more deeply, independent learning, and qualitative differences in writing, etc is true generally. Yes, there are exceptions based on the individual.
That Is Nice is offline  
#75 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 04:29 AM
 
That Is Nice's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 7,036
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kristine233 View Post

My grandparents owned a business and retired comfortably, degreeless.
One of the major differences between their generation and ours is what they were able to accomplish economically without a degree.

It's much more difficult now to find economic success without a degree or trade credential.

It can be done; it's just more difficult. Like someone else said, maybe with hard work and persistence you can find one or two good jobs without a degree. But can you find them repeatedly if you are facing a lay off, etc? You'd have to be pretty lucky and pretty scrappy. It just adds more degrees of complication without a degree.
That Is Nice is offline  
#76 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 04:36 AM
 
misswerewolf's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 364
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kristine233 View Post
Is there a big snubbing of people with 2 year degrees vs 4 years? I'm curious as everyone is referring to 4 year degree and then "uneducated". So does a person with a 2 year degree fall into the uneducated category?
Well, I don't know about the snubbing part, but I do know that a standard, universal college degree (i.e., proof that you've studied your ass off at university) covers around 4 years of higher study...which, of course, is a Bachelor's of something-or-other. I remember being told (by quite a few people, actually!) that an Associate's Degree is not a "real" degree, so I never bothered applying for one.

Actually, I think I know why, come to think of it. In the first two years of university, most students, if not all, study general education required courses (that is, lower division courses); all of lower division stuff can be completed at community colleges. It's not until the last two years (upper division level) that one has the opportunity to study the interesting stuff, which you will not tend to find at community colleges. This is the time that most students actually declare their majors and study what they want to study.
misswerewolf is offline  
#77 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 05:09 AM
 
Poddi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: BC, Canada
Posts: 1,929
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quick question: if a person went to a Bible college for 4 years and graduated, does that count as a 4-year degree? I think it should count, but I'm not sure what job opportunities it can bring. Ministers need masters or more, right? We know a couple people who have those.

Mom to 2 beautiful autistic boys (12 & 11)  
Poddi is online now  
#78 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 08:48 AM
 
Tradd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 3,160
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Re: people with two-year degrees...

I count trade school/community college as "educated." Hey, an electrician needs to be "educated." Or a car mechanic, for that matter.

My "uneducated" relatives, who harassed me for my love of books, considered even *trade school* to be a waste of time/effort. OK, so maybe you don't want to go for a four-year degree, but if you're good with your hands and like working on cars, what about trade school to be an auto mechanic? Would be good in this economy, since lots of people are keeping their cars longer and need to get things fixed (my mechanic reports he's seeing many more people coming in now). My brother takes after the relatives on my dad's side of the family. My parents offered to pay for trade school for him (auto mechanic, since he was always tinkering), but he flat out refused it. Didn't see the need. Now, it would have been a very good thing. But, no, couldn't be bothered. And now, he's in a really tight spot. He's lucky his wife is a school teacher.

So, if you've got some sort of education, whether traditional college or trade school, you're educated in my book. However, if you turn up your nose at ANY sort of education, even trade school, yeah, you're uneducated.

lady.gif
Tradd is offline  
#79 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 08:52 AM
 
the_lissa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Southern Ontario, Canada
Posts: 13,248
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Yes I count trade school, apprenticeship, or college to be just as educated as university. You cannot get any kind of job here without one of those options. Even min wage jobs are difficult to get with just a high school diploma, and forget it if you haven't finished high school.

Jam 7, Peanut Butter 5, and Bread 2.

the_lissa is offline  
#80 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 11:39 AM
mtm
 
mtm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,481
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Most of the people in my area have undergrad degrees or trades training. Both dh and I have degrees. My siblings do not, both stopped with high school. One has their own niche business that is successful, the other works a corporate job and is pretty high up but has now stalled out for promotion due to education. No way would the corporate one have been able to get that high starting out now, times are changing.
mtm is offline  
#81 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 12:34 PM
 
Kristine233's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Way Northern MN
Posts: 4,154
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by misswerewolf View Post

Actually, I think I know why, come to think of it. In the first two years of university, most students, if not all, study general education required courses (that is, lower division courses); all of lower division stuff can be completed at community colleges. It's not until the last two years (upper division level) that one has the opportunity to study the interesting stuff, which you will not tend to find at community colleges. This is the time that most students actually declare their majors and study what they want to study.
That's not the case here, but it could be the programs both DH and I are planning on going to. Prior when I went through college I'd consider that a trade degree. It was 2 years (although I did accelerated so it was slightly faster) in Interactive Media. All the classes related directly to that, no generals.

My husband is going for Radiologic Technologies. He has 2 semesters of generals/pre-reqs and then 2 more years of specified classes. Its 3 years but he only gets a 2 year degree. I'm guessing that would be a "trade skills" program then?

I'm going back to school to be an LPN, its a 2 year program. When I'm done I will have 5 years of college and hold two 2 year degrees. IMO the courses I studied/will be studying are interesting and mean something. I'll only officially be a "sophomore" but I'll definitely have more education than 2 years. Unless I decide to do the RN program after, that's another 2 years for a total of 7 years, but still nothing higher than a 2 year degree awarded. Oh, and companies aren't looking at more than a 2 year where I live. *shrug* But we're a huge mining area so the way our town is supported is different than the majority of the US I'm sure.

Anyways, my point is... you don't have to have a 4 year degree to be educated or do well financially.

Mom to Joscelyne 14, Andrew 12, and Mackenzie 10 and wife to Nate.
Kristine233 is offline  
#82 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 01:06 PM
 
mar123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 582
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Almost everyone I know has a 4 year degree, and many have a master's degree. I am teacher, which of course is a job that requires a degree- which explains why so many people I know have a degree. My kids also go to Catholic school, and most of the parents have college degrees has well. Where I live, the economy is very stable. I don't know anyone who has lost his or her job or anyone who is really struggling. I mean, I know people who could use more money, but no one who has to go without because of money.
mar123 is offline  
#83 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 01:23 PM
 
misswerewolf's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 364
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kristine233 View Post
My husband is going for Radiologic Technologies. He has 2 semesters of generals/pre-reqs and then 2 more years of specified classes. Its 3 years but he only gets a 2 year degree. I'm guessing that would be a "trade skills" program then?
That, I believe, is usually referred to a certification or a training/apprenticeship...at least, in my neck of the woods. A "degree" is a Bachelor-of-something-or-other or higher. Then again, I should note that I am looking at this from a more classical perspective. Maybe the times have changed? I dunno.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kristine233 View Post
Anyways, my point is... you don't have to have a 4 year degree to be educated or do well financially.
Agreed. Intelligent or education does not necessarily play a role in having or obtaining wealth!
misswerewolf is offline  
#84 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 01:41 PM
 
Kristine233's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Way Northern MN
Posts: 4,154
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by misswerewolf View Post
That, I believe, is usually referred to a certification or a training/apprenticeship...at least, in my neck of the woods. A "degree" is a Bachelor-of-something-or-other or higher. Then again, I should note that I am looking at this from a more classical perspective. Maybe the times have changed? I dunno.



Agreed. Intelligent or education does not necessarily play a role in having or obtaining wealth!
You get an AA or AS degree.

ETA, I should clarify: When you apply to the program you have the option of doing just a certification or getting the 2 year degree. (which is more than 2 years, lol) I had the same option when I applied to the LPN program, just get the certification or go for a degree.

Mom to Joscelyne 14, Andrew 12, and Mackenzie 10 and wife to Nate.
Kristine233 is offline  
#85 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 01:45 PM
 
notwonamesalike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 1,105
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
It's a mixed bag for us. Most of our close friends have bachelor's degrees or higher (including us).

Many of the mom's I hang out with at mommy groups and play dates do not.

Me:
notwonamesalike is offline  
#86 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 01:49 PM
 
polyhymnia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Greater Seattle area
Posts: 2,576
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krystal323 View Post
Really?? NO one?? You must live in some other wonderful dimension--that sounds truly divine... :

Everyone I know, with the exception of one couple, is struggling--some terribly. I can't even imagine a circle of friends in which financial struggle was not a regular topic of conversation
It's just a different environment here. I guess I have a narrow group of coworkers/friends, we are all very lucky, I don't know anyone really who is struggling except my mother (and she made some career decisions that she knew would lead to her struggling - it's not directly related to the current economy). I imagine our area will be harder hit going forward, now that we are starting to see layoffs at some of the big companies, but it's been slow coming.

jog.gif:bikenew.gif// knit.gif:reading.gif:notes2.gif // cat.gif:cat.gif 

Our precious baby girl is coming to turn our world upside down in January 2014!

polyhymnia is offline  
#87 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 01:58 PM
 
misswerewolf's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 364
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kristine233 View Post
You get an AA or AS degree.

ETA, I should clarify: When you apply to the program you have the option of doing just a certification or getting the 2 year degree. (which is ore than 2 years, lol) I had the same option when I applied to the LPN program, just get the certification or go for a degree.
Yeah, I understand that it is referred to as a degree. What I'm trying to say is that it is often not viewed as a "real" degree, but more of a certification or a an apprenticeship. I hope that doesn't offend; I'm just relating how I've understood it to mean, and how it's viewed in my area. For example, many (if not most) employers will not accept that as a minimum degree; they will specifically request that you have a BA or BS or BFA. In certain fields, though, like nursing or radiology technology, an Associate's Degree is perfectly acceptable.
misswerewolf is offline  
#88 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 02:12 PM
 
annethcz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: on the beautiful prairie of MN
Posts: 9,947
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I think there is a big difference between larger cities and more rural areas.

When I lived in the suburbs, it seemed like everyone had a college degree. It was pretty unusual for me to run into someone who DIDN'T have a college degree. And like misswerewolf was saying, an associate's degree wasn't really looked at as a 'real' degree. I'm not saying that I agree, but that's they way it was viewed. An AA wasn't really worth anything.

But now that I'm living in a smaller town, I'm meeting a lot more people who aren't as highly educated. I would say that about half of the people I know have bachelor's degrees or higher. The only reason the percentage is that high is because I spend a lot of time at the kids' school and a teaching license requires a college degree.

New signature, same old me: Ann- mama of 2 boys and 2 girls, partnered to a fabulous man.
I'm an unintentional weasel feeder and I suck at proofreading.
annethcz is offline  
#89 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 02:32 PM
 
Knittin' in the Shade's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: near Philly, PA
Posts: 4,637
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krystal323 View Post
Really?? NO one?? You must live in some other wonderful dimension--that sounds truly divine... :

Everyone I know, with the exception of one couple, is struggling--some terribly. I can't even imagine a circle of friends in which financial struggle was not a regular topic of conversation
I only know (personally, in "real life") two people struggling financially. One, because her dumba$$ of a husband walked out on her 2 weeks after she gave birth to their 3rd child, and is giving her a ridiculously paltry sum of money for child support (while he's making over 300K a year!) and she's a teacher, so she's not been able to secure a job this late in the school year (though she does have one for next fall already lined up) So that's a temporary financial struggle. The other, a friend of my son's dad was just laid off, he was in the banking industry and hasn't been able to find another job (he's almost 60, so I think that is a big factor, unfortunately) Otherwise, everyone in our circle of friends is doing well.
Knittin' in the Shade is offline  
#90 of 104 Old 05-04-2009, 02:54 PM
 
shayinme's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: land of lobster and lighthouses
Posts: 5,272
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by annethcz View Post
I think there is a big difference between larger cities and more rural areas.

When I lived in the suburbs, it seemed like everyone had a college degree. It was pretty unusual for me to run into someone who DIDN'T have a college degree. And like misswerewolf was saying, an associate's degree wasn't really looked at as a 'real' degree. I'm not saying that I agree, but that's they way it was viewed. An AA wasn't really worth anything.

But now that I'm living in a smaller town, I'm meeting a lot more people who aren't as highly educated. I would say that about half of the people I know have bachelor's degrees or higher. The only reason the percentage is that high is because I spend a lot of time at the kids' school and a teaching license requires a college degree.
: This is my experience as well, when I lived in Chicago most everyone I knew in my circle had at least a BA/BS with most having or planning for graduate degrees. I live in Maine and now its a mixed bag, strangely here the people I know who are the most comfortable are folks in the trades. (Plumber, carpenter, etc)

I have a small group of friends with degrees and while we are not struggling the way my folks did when I was a kid, many are from families including my own (thanks FIL ) where we get some help from family.

In our case we were gifted a house, for others its really generous gifts of cash that allow credit cards to get paid off.

However as someone who works with families in poverty, none of my friends are at the level where they are going to the food pantry, some though may get state medical care for their kids and that is despite having degrees. Many of my friends either work in the non-profit or arts sector so despite having degrees they aren't exactly in high paying professions. Of course living in a rural state makes it harder in such positions.

Mothering since 1992...its one of the many hats I wear.
shayinme is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off