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#1 of 36 Old 10-02-2009, 04:43 PM - Thread Starter
 
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To make a long story very short, over the next 6 months, my family will be receiving a series of windfalls totalling nearly $25,000 (including about $6,000-$7,000 in tax refunds--all from additional child tax credit and EITC). Assuming a few things, what would you do with these sums of money?
--We have $1000 emergency fund
--A very small student loan and some consumer debt (totalling less than half of the total amount of the windfalls)
--No vehicle loans, but our cars have 100,000 and 150,000 miles on them, respectively and only seat 4 and 5 passengers, respectively.
--We plan to have a 4th child in the next 12-18 months
--Total household income is slightly <$35,000/yr (living in a very LCOL area)

What would YOU do with these windfalls?
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#2 of 36 Old 10-02-2009, 04:52 PM
 
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Pay off debt and fully fund a 6 month emergency fund, anything left to a sinking fund for a new vehicle.
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#3 of 36 Old 10-02-2009, 04:54 PM
 
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I would pay off the debt, then trade in the older/higher mileage vehicle for a used minivan that will seat the whole family. Add whatever is left, plus whatever you've been paying monthly on the debt, to savings.

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#4 of 36 Old 10-02-2009, 05:01 PM
 
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Pay off debt and fully fund a 6 month emergency fund, anything left to a sinking fund for a new vehicle.
That's exactly what I would do.
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#5 of 36 Old 10-02-2009, 05:26 PM
 
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I would pay off the debt, then trade in the older/higher mileage vehicle for a used minivan that will seat the whole family. Add whatever is left, plus whatever you've been paying monthly on the debt, to savings.
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#6 of 36 Old 10-02-2009, 05:32 PM
 
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Pay off debt and fully fund a 6 month emergency fund, anything left to a sinking fund for a new vehicle.
This. I was tempted to go for you getting a used mini-van, but you plan on ttc for a year or more away. That gives you time to save up money for a vehicle yourselves. This is the least risk, and allows you to have a lot more wiggle room, since all your debt is gone. Whatever you've been paying to debt, pay to savings.

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#7 of 36 Old 10-02-2009, 10:57 PM
 
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Pay off debt and fully fund a 6 month emergency fund, anything left to a sinking fund for a new vehicle.
Yes.
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Whatever you've been paying to debt, pay to savings.
ITA.

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#8 of 36 Old 10-02-2009, 11:04 PM
 
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Pay off debt and fully fund a 6 month emergency fund, anything left to a sinking fund for a new vehicle.
Yes!
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#9 of 36 Old 10-03-2009, 12:23 AM
 
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Pay down debt and buy a minivan so we all could fit in one vehicle.
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#10 of 36 Old 10-03-2009, 12:26 AM
 
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Pay of all debt, and do 6 months living expenses in savings.

I am hardcore about no debt. When you have no debt - you have freedom. There's no reason to wait on paying debt!

Or, after paying all the debt, do 3 months living expenses and use the rest to purchase a (quality) used car. I had a used car that had 250,000 plus miles on it. I bought it that way. I replaced all the belts (including timing) on it, and it ran wonderfully for years. No problems, and just a dream car considering I paid less than $500.00 for it. I wound up donating it to a charity program - still in good condition.

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#11 of 36 Old 10-03-2009, 04:18 AM
 
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I recently watched Suze Orman on Oprah with financial advice for the new economy. She said that financial advice shoud change as the economy changes. Her new advice was save the cash because on a time of crisis having cash on hands means staying afloat when things go down the drain.

It made sense to me, so I would just save the money, stop using the CC and continue to pay the minimum payment on the debt and student loans. I know it's not the popular advice here, but that's what I would do. I would sleep much better at night knowing I have 25k in a secure deposit somewhere that I could use to put food on the table and a roof over our heads no matter what.
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#12 of 36 Old 10-03-2009, 09:39 AM
 
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What others have said - pay debt, emergency fund, and saw for a new/used vehicle until a baby is here (or one of the existing vehicles fails utterly).
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#13 of 36 Old 10-03-2009, 10:30 AM
 
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I recently watched Suze Orman on Oprah with financial advice for the new economy. She said that financial advice shoud change as the economy changes. Her new advice was save the cash because on a time of crisis having cash on hands means staying afloat when things go down the drain.
LOL that lady is so funny.

Ditto what Roadworkahead said.
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#14 of 36 Old 10-03-2009, 10:33 AM
 
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Pay off debt and fully fund a 6 month emergency fund, anything left to a sinking fund for a new vehicle.
Ditto!
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#15 of 36 Old 10-03-2009, 11:15 AM
 
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Pay off debt and fully fund a 6 month emergency fund, anything left to a sinking fund for a new vehicle.
Plus take a little bit and do something FUN with it. A weekend away? A toy your family wants? Set aside a bit to enjoy.

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#16 of 36 Old 10-03-2009, 11:18 AM
 
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I would pay off the debt, then trade in the older/higher mileage vehicle for a used minivan that will seat the whole family. Add whatever is left, plus whatever you've been paying monthly on the debt, to savings.
This. And add whatever you've been paying toward your debts to the sinking fund for the new vehicle, running your current vehicles until the newb is born or one of the current vehicles fails beyond easy/low cost repair.
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#17 of 36 Old 10-03-2009, 11:51 AM
 
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Well, it would depend on exactly how much the debt totals and the interest rate and what your monthly expenses are- I would want the debt gone, a 3-6 mo emergency fund and a fund for a "new" vehicle. And I would for sure take a bit to have a little fun.

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#18 of 36 Old 10-03-2009, 12:41 PM
 
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Pay off debt and fully fund a 6 month emergency fund, anything left to a sinking fund for a new vehicle.
same here!
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#19 of 36 Old 10-03-2009, 01:00 PM
 
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I recently watched Suze Orman on Oprah with financial advice for the new economy. She said that financial advice shoud change as the economy changes. Her new advice was save the cash because on a time of crisis having cash on hands means staying afloat when things go down the drain.

It made sense to me, so I would just save the money, stop using the CC and continue to pay the minimum payment on the debt and student loans. I know it's not the popular advice here, but that's what I would do. I would sleep much better at night knowing I have 25k in a secure deposit somewhere that I could use to put food on the table and a roof over our heads no matter what.
I like this advice alot. It's close to what I would do. I probably want to keep about 10K liquid and spend the rest of paying down the consumer debt and buying a new car outright. I'd keep the student loan.

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#20 of 36 Old 10-03-2009, 03:05 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Olma View Post
I recently watched Suze Orman on Oprah with financial advice for the new economy. She said that financial advice shoud change as the economy changes. Her new advice was save the cash because on a time of crisis having cash on hands means staying afloat when things go down the drain.

It made sense to me, so I would just save the money, stop using the CC and continue to pay the minimum payment on the debt and student loans. I know it's not the popular advice here, but that's what I would do. I would sleep much better at night knowing I have 25k in a secure deposit somewhere that I could use to put food on the table and a roof over our heads no matter what.
This is what I would do too. For my peace of mind, right now in these economic times, money in the bank is much more easy to sleep to then a paid off loan.
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#21 of 36 Old 10-04-2009, 03:27 PM
 
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Pay off debt and fully fund a 6 month emergency fund, anything left to a sinking fund for a new vehicle.
I fully agree!
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#22 of 36 Old 10-04-2009, 09:16 PM - Thread Starter
 
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OP here, thanks for the input! Many of your responses are in line with what I was thinking. I have a serious aversion to debt and want to pay it all off (even though the student loan is under $1,000 at .5% and the other consumer debt is at 0%-4.99% fixed rates for the life of the balances). The vehicle that will be replaced first is an '02 Subaru Outback--Edmonds puts its value around $7500--a little less of trade-in, a little more to sell outright. I figure that plus a couple thousand should get a nice used mini-van that will last for several years to come until we save enough to buy a nearly-new minivan later down the line. We'd also like to get at least another $5000 into an E-Fund (which would put us around 3-months) and take about $5000 to get a good used motorcycle for DH. Part of the money will be from my father's estate, from the sale of his motorcycle, and we'd like to get a bike for our family to ride in honor and memory of him. If we can get a bike for a little less, then whatever is left over would be added to savings, and our saving would be upped about $250/month by eliminating all debt except for the mortgage.
I welcome any additional input that ya'll have. Thank you!
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#23 of 36 Old 10-04-2009, 09:56 PM
 
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I would wait on the minivan. As long as your Outback is running fine, keep driving it. Just save the money to buy a minivan when the outback dies or when you get pregnant. No reason to drive a bigger, more expensive car until then.

If you get a motorcycle, will you sell one of your cars?

In summary:

I would leave the SL be, and keep paying it monthly.
I would pay off the other debt.
I would devote 5000$ to the motorcycle (well I wouldn't but I understand why you want to)
I would put the rest in saving, part for e-fund, and the rest for new car fund when you get pg or the outback dies.

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#24 of 36 Old 10-04-2009, 10:15 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I understand what you mean about keeping the SL, which, in theory makes a lot of sense, but it would only be another 1-2 months of payments after we add in the rest of our debt snowball to it. I'd kind of like to see it gone in one fell swoop too--does that make sense?
As far as the motorcycle replacing another vehicle goes, that's a tough one. If I could talk DH into selling our Jeep Wrangler (worth around $8000, give or take according to Edmonds) instead of the Outback (good luck with that one!), I would rather sell it, keep the Outback and get a mini-van when the time comes. I LOVE my Outback and am clinging to it until I'm 7-8 months pregnant again, if I can help it! We can't rely on the motorcycle for a second vehicle though, because of the climate of cold, snowy winters and DH works unpredictable hours (he works for a school) and I need a car for work, although I work only on an intermittent basis. An "older", higher-mileage vehicle would be fine for years for his commuter car, though.
We plan to TTC beginning in Dec., and if our track record with becoming pregnant continues, we'll be pregnant by the time the final chunk of change hits with tax season, so we'd start pricing vehicles by spring/summer to be prepared.
While the bike seems a bit frivolous, I feel like it's something worth doing, considering the source of part of the windfall, and something that would be both meaningful and useful (at least 8 months of the year) to our family. I'm just hoping to keep it around $5000 instead of $15000 or so!
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#25 of 36 Old 10-04-2009, 11:48 PM
 
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I would skip skip skip the bike - especially if you are looking at a Harley*. Put that $5K in an emergency fund and get a used bike in 5 years or so, after you are home owners and fully on your feet. The bike is a $5K toy for your husband. You can remember your Dad with a photograph of his bike, or his bike keys on a hook somewhere. You don't need another bike to remember him by.

(Why am I down on a Harley? If you buy new you are paying $5,000 for a bike and $15,000 for some extra chrome and a name plate. Plus another $500 for the jacket, boots, helmet all with the Harley logo. Wouldn't a downpayment on a house be better?)
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#26 of 36 Old 10-05-2009, 05:03 AM
 
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I'd want money in the bank before I paid off the types of debt you have. The windfalls your family is expecting is a significant amount compared to your annual income, but isn't enough to move you into a new lifestyle. I'd be careful in how you proceed and look to a wide range of sources for advice.

[FWIW: I'm a DIY finance gal......nothing against any of the popular gurus. I don't really believe in a one plan fits all strategy, though.]

I'd keep the student loan at its minimum payment or slightly higher (forget the snowball) and I'd keep the 0% consumer debt at its minimum payment since you mentioned it was for the life of the balance (forget the snowball). I would pay off any consumer debt that has a higher interest rate than you can get in an investment account within your comfort range (savings, money market, mutual fund - free accounts with better than average yields and/or low trade costs - will take some research). I would use the snowball method for paying the ones off that are below what you could get in savings. I would also consider paying all these off (except SL and 0%) with your windfalls.

I'd also start thinking about retirement accounts for you and DH. (Starting young really makes a big difference!) Maybe he has a 401k (or equivalent) available to him? I'd use the monthly amount you were paying to debt to fund this. Your employment seems unlikely to offer a 401k, so I'd open an IRA and fully fund it with a windfall. If DH doesn't have a 401k opportunity, then I'd fully fund an IRA for him, too. $5k is the maximum contribution for 2009 under many circumstances for each person. It may change for 2010.

I would upgrade a vehicle when you are 7-8 months pregnant, like you mentioned. I'd save the money from your windfalls to fund this.

A modest family vacation or a $5k motorcycle or whatever is up to you. Enjoying some of those windfalls is part of what makes life fun and I consider that important, but the details are so personal for each family.

I'd basically "save" most of the money in a variety of accounts for future expenses after paying off the debt that is truly costing you and having at least a little fun.

"Kind words can be short and easy to speak, but their echoes are truly endless." - Mother Teresa

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#27 of 36 Old 10-05-2009, 09:29 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I would skip skip skip the bike - especially if you are looking at a Harley*. Put that $5K in an emergency fund and get a used bike in 5 years or so, after you are home owners and fully on your feet. The bike is a $5K toy for your husband. You can remember your Dad with a photograph of his bike, or his bike keys on a hook somewhere. You don't need another bike to remember him by.

(Why am I down on a Harley? If you buy new you are paying $5,000 for a bike and $15,000 for some extra chrome and a name plate. Plus another $500 for the jacket, boots, helmet all with the Harley logo. Wouldn't a downpayment on a house be better?)
I understand your thoughts, but with a few more details, would it make sense?
--We are currently buying our home--we are 5 years into a 15-year mortgage, paying extra when we can to (ideally) have this house paid in full in 7-8 more years.
--We would be buying a used Harley through the dealership that my dad worked at, most likely, at my dad's "employee discount" cost--and NOT buying all the "extras" in chrome/customization. We already have our jackets, boots, helmets, etc. from our circa-1980 Yamaha and riding with my dad for 15 years. I ride too, when not pregnant or with a nursling.

I realize it's not for everyone, but with these details, I just want to make sure it's not completely unreasonably, similar to planning a grand vacation or a home remodel. Not really an investment, but adding to quality of life.
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#28 of 36 Old 10-05-2009, 09:42 AM
 
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I would still do emergency fund, retirement fund, or college fund before getting a used Harley. You did ask on the "frugality" board not the "fun" board.
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#29 of 36 Old 10-05-2009, 09:57 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I would still do emergency fund, retirement fund, or college fund before getting a used Harley. You did ask on the "frugality" board not the "fun" board.
You're right--that's not the most frugal part of the plan for the money, is it? Assuming the bike stays part of the plan, or changing the amount of "windfalls" to $20,000, I guess the biggest question is what's a better use of the money, pay off all debts except our mortgage and sink the rest into savings (mostly E-Fund and a few thousand toward car replacement fund for next year-ish) or sink most/all into savings. My inclination is to do the former, as I am very debt-averse and want to be done with remains of the financially crummy last few years once and for all, but I also want to have a fairly decent E-fund to keep the debt from coming back. All consumer debt is related to medical bills, car accident, and mostly from lay-offs from when my husband worked in the construction field before moving to a more stable educational field. I'm ready to put all of that behind us and move forward once and for all!
Oh, and we have IRAs set up, but aren't yet maxing them out--just adding to them as we can. I know any little bit helps, but since I'll be 30 next year and DH is 28, we know it's time to really get serious about that before we get into our 30's. DH is eligible for an employer-matching 403b in August, so we will be contributing to that at least to the employer-matching level beginning in August.
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#30 of 36 Old 10-05-2009, 10:06 AM
 
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Part of the money will be from my father's estate, from the sale of his motorcycle, and we'd like to get a bike for our family to ride in honor and memory of him.
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--We would be buying a used Harley through the dealership that my dad worked at, most likely, at my dad's "employee discount" cost--

So why not keep your dad's bike? Wouldn't that honour him more than selling and buying another?
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