What if you never have leftovers? Feeding a HUGE family... - Page 2 - Mothering Forums
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#31 of 41 Old 11-17-2010, 05:19 AM
 
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How about a really big soup pot?  We have a 16L pot, I don't think 8 people can possibly eat all that in one meal, and soup is pretty easy to make.  


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#32 of 41 Old 11-17-2010, 06:54 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Actually, the offending foods rarely show on tests, but show big results on challenges, lol. Baby got "colicky" and hyper-spitty again yesterday because I ate green beans. Grrr!! Back to my 6 base fooods again before I can try something new. Sigh...

 

Thank you all for the tips! I bought a roaster oven at the grocery store this week at half off! And I have family lending me their crockpots for Thanksgiving. I do have a largeish chunk of money coming to us in Jan, with which we plan to buy a portion of grass-fed organic beef. It's just so long away... I receive WIC and FS currently, so it's hard to spend more versus trying to find ways to save, but it's exceptionally hard to save when you have to buy allergen-free foods and/or when you really want to go back to more of a caveman diet. Sigh... We do what we can with what we've got and with luck and even more hard work dh will get that promotion at work and finish school next year for a more lucrative career and we'll no longer have these dilemmas.

 

Keep the ideas coming, as I think this thread is also helping others.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rosehip View Post

 

As for the food allergies - I'm not at all minimizing the issue, but I was wondering if you're going on blood or skin tests or whether the gang has done actual food challenges (this can be done safely in a doctor's office).  A lot of people (including doctors!) don't realize that there is a VERY high rate of "allergies" that show up on blood & skin tests are not actually allergies at all.  That is to say, the person can eat the "offending item" and be absolutely fine.  I just wanted to point this out in case it were a possibility, & it might make your life in the kitchen a bit easier.


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#33 of 41 Old 11-17-2010, 07:17 AM
 
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OP, maybe you could get better ideas if you list your dietary restrictions?  It sounds like there are tons.  If it's just you and the baby w/the food sensitivities, could you not cook something separately for you and cook more budget-friendly food for everyone else?  Normally I'm not for being a short order cook, however, in this situation maybe it would be more beneficial to your budget?

 

I 2nd the really big soup pot.  I often use my crawfish pot!  Or my big canner.  For instance, on Tday weekend, we'll be busy, busy splitting wood all weekend to get us thru the winter.  We're renting a log splitter, so we have to get it done, and there is ALOT.  Anyway, I'm planning on taking the turkey carcasses and dumping them into the crawfish pot on Thanksgiving night to simmer away on my stove.  Then I'll add in a BUNCH of veggies, some turkey meat, and make a huge pot of rice.  We'll let the soup simmer outside on the propane burner while we split wood and it'll be enough to feed all of us, plus the neighbors (2) and have tons of leftovers!


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#34 of 41 Old 11-17-2010, 08:51 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicky2 View Post

OP, maybe you could get better ideas if you list your dietary restrictions?  It sounds like there are tons.  If it's just you and the baby w/the food sensitivities, could you not cook something separately for you and cook more budget-friendly food for everyone else?  Normally I'm not for being a short order cook, however, in this situation maybe it would be more beneficial to your budget?

 

Mine are extensive. The kids lose a lot of their reaction before age 2, so we ease up a bit after that, but still try to limit.

 

In all of the kids combined there have been allergies to:

Dairy

Soy

Corn

Garlic

Cinnamon

Egg

Onions

Almonds

Cucumbers

Pears

Coconut

Rice

Green beans

Yeast

Glycerin

Pork

Carrots

Grapes

Oats

Citrus Fruits

 

As you can see, it's very difficult. The cheese, rice and bread fillers aren't as easy in our house. We can only do those things once a week, max. The first 6 are the ones we avoid the most, as every child has reacted to them. The rest aren't as insidious and don't seem to cause much reaction in them anymore. I avoid it all. I'm currently able to eat beef, tomatoes, apples, squash, potatoes, enjoy life chocolate, and barley (with only salt as seasoning). Every new thing I've tried beyond those so far has been a bust. We do make my meals separately. The rest of the family could never survive on only those things. I couldn't even do it if it didn't directly effect my life (colic!). And just about everything we make is from scratch (always for me when nursing, but usually for the rest, too) which is probably why I hate cooking so much. No "semi-homemade" for me. Sigh...


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#35 of 41 Old 11-17-2010, 11:36 AM
 
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Ok that list would have helped in your first post, plus saying you wanted a more paleo/NT diet.  nod.gif  If you don't add those you will get a TON of "eat more rice and beans and tell everyone to give up meat" replies.

 

 

 

 

My youngest has an allergy list as long as yours. It works best when we eliminate any foods that have had an "ana" reaction from the entire house so we do not have to worry about a reaction. I also EBF/pumped for him for 3 years after his dx and I ate ONLY what he could eat the entire time. It was hard but I made it.  {{{{{{{{{hugs}}}}}}}}

 

 

 

Ok WIC and EBF does limit the choices. Did you receive more for the extra people? Can/do any of them help with food money? Two things... I assume you will likely get a decent/good tax return next year? Take some of that money and STOCK up on pricey items and freezer meats/foods. Also make sure to stock your pantry as well as you can. It will help ENORMOUSLY!!!

 

 

Do you all use all the WIC milk? Can you make yogurt or soft cheese with it?

 

 

Do you live in a place you can garden or raise any animals? Have any family or friends you can do this at?

 

 

I would definately soak (ala Nourishing Traditions/ Weston Price) any grain/rice/bean dishes you make. And for anyone person in the family that does NOT have an allergy, they will have to recieve more of the "filler" foods if they are still hungry. Making lots of bone broth to cook these foods in will help. The whole gelatin being "protein sparing" bit.

 

 

Are you plating food for people or do they serve themselves?

 

 

I 2nd and 3rd making huge amounts of soup (even daily) and letting people fill up a bit on it each night at dinner time, or telling them once they finished their dinner if they are still hungry go eat the soup in the crock pot.

 

 

If there is NO other way to increase your income/food budget then the simple fact is that there is only so much you can cut down and some or all people will have to eat less in general or less of certain items. And it sucks. greensad.gif  If this is going to be a long term issue for years, you all may want to brainstorm on ways you can increase your food security or income.... whether living somewhere you can grow/raise food, bartering with farmers/neighbors/friends, going back to school for better job prospects, trying to find higher paying work, etc... Eventually you can only stretch a dollar so far before it breaks, so start hardcore thinking on a new game plan.

 

Good luck!!!!!  hug2.gif


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#36 of 41 Old 11-17-2010, 01:30 PM
 
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That's a really good idea, Thystle.

 

Make a large pot of vegetable soup (remember the cabbage soup diet, hehe) and serve a bowl with each meal. We eat a lot of soup during the winter. You could add barley to the soup to make it more filling.

 

Can you use quinoa instead of rice?

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#37 of 41 Old 11-17-2010, 02:54 PM
 
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We're feeding six people every day (2 adults: kids aged 10, 7, 5, & 3). We do a lot of cheaper meals.

 

- spaghetti w/meatless sauce & rolls

 

- scrambled eggs and toast w/juice

 

- macaroni & cheese w/roasted potatoes and a green vegetable

 

- grilled cheese & soup

 

- pb&j, chips & apples


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#38 of 41 Old 11-19-2010, 08:38 AM
 
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We are vegetarian, so no help on the turkey, but I"ve seen my mom cook dinners for 15-20 on a 4 burner stove on just a regular weekend. People help out, eat in shifts, warm food, help clean up etc. It is probably different when so many of the mouths are children, (so not helpful/more demanding). But I think you could definitely do it if you are already used to feeding six! 

 

As for leftovers, I agree with the advice to pull out food before hand. Growing up, we always had leftovers. My mom always cooked extra, and we had leftovers at every meal. My husbands family never did. When I started cooking for him when we were dating, I was shocked (Shocked!!!), when after cleaning his plate, he started eating straight out of the pot. And after that was all gone, he looked at me and said-- "whoa, you made too much food." He was taught to always clean his plate (and, apparently, every thing else on the table), where as in my household, to not have food leftover would have meant we were lacking.

 

Perhaps your husband grew up in a household like my dh's?


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#39 of 41 Old 11-22-2010, 01:20 PM
 
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I would ask your relatives from out of town to stop at the store and pick up stuff to share that can be bought (pies, rolls, cranberry, drinks ect). You don't need to have a Thanksgiving meltdown with a newborn :)

 

We have people drive 2-3 hours to come to our home on Thanksgiving and everyone still manages to participate in the potluck. we use coolers to keep things cold and crockpots to keep some things warm. When I take the turkey out I tent it for 30 minutes while I make gravy, that's whe everyone uses the oven to heat their rolls, casseroles ect.  


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#40 of 41 Old 11-22-2010, 01:42 PM
 
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Sorry about all those allergies. I eat a paleo diet myself (to control chronic Lyme's symptoms) and it does cost a lot more without the grains and I must eat meat. I do provide brown rice/ breads for my family so that helps. 

I agree with Thysle on the money--sometimes you can only make it go so far..I hope you find a plan that works for your family (((hugs))).

 

On the cooking, maybe someone from church/friends/family can come over peroidically and help you cook big pots of stew, meatloafs, and portions of meat ect to keep in the freezer for you to take out and make meals easier sometimes so you can get a break here and there.


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#41 of 41 Old 11-23-2010, 11:18 AM
 
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Some foods to consider:

 

Meats:

Beef, lamb, all sorts of poultry.

 

Grains and starches:

Quinoa, Bulgur wheat, wheat, barley, couscous, potatoes, sweet potatoes, turnips

 

Legumes:

dry peas, lentils, dozens of kinds of dry beans

 

Veggies:

Instead of carrots, what about parsnips? Instead of green beans...heck, anyone can survive without green beans. But it looks like most greens (spinach, chard, kale, etc.), broccoli, cauliflower, all sorts of squash, celery, all sorts of peppers are not on your allergy list. It still leaves a good bit of variety.

 

Fruits:

Berries (straw, blue, black, rasp, cran, etc.), mango, papaya, apple, pineapple, and cactus pear all come quickly to mind.

 

Dairy substitutes: WIC gives goat's milk as an option, have you tried that? My DD did quite well with it. It's quite expensive, but if WIC will pay for it...

 

Also, consider that things that can be tolerated you may be fine putting them on a rotation diet for, rather than stress over total elimination.

 

For bread, you can make your own soda bread without using any of the allergens, since wheat isn't on the list. Biscuits, pancakes, potato pancakes, all are pretty easy and don't use yeast.

 

For thanksgiving, I would probably do something along these lines:

 

Turkey in oven

 

Crock pot 1: Sweet potatoes with brown sugar and pecans instead of marshmallows.

 

Broccoli cranberry salad is a yummy side, and cold. Any other side would do as well: pasta salad, perhaps? The ingredients listed on the pasta I buy is 100% durum wheat, nothing else.

 

I'd skip the green bean casserole. Make peas instead. Microwave or steam them on the stovetop.

 

Mashed potatoes w/ turkey gravy. Cook the potatoes the day before and reheat.

 

Biscuits

 

Energ-G egg replacer will work in pumpkin pie recipes, as will goat's milk. Homemade apple pie can be very simple with relatively few ingredients (apples, a little sugar, nutmeg). You could also make apple crisp with rolled wheat in place of oatmeal for the crunchies on top. Have you tried cooking with lard? If butter and coconut oil are out, it may be an option to check. Since it's pure fat the proteins that are likely allergens in pork are largely absent, and it's great for things like frying, and in pastry (i.e. pie crust). It's also very, very cheap.

 

The part about not knowing how to cook for a big family amuses me, honestly, because it's taken YEARS for me to learn how to NOT cook for way too many people, because I learned to cook in a family of six-seven people!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by gabbyraja View Post

 

 

Mine are extensive. The kids lose a lot of their reaction before age 2, so we ease up a bit after that, but still try to limit.

 

In all of the kids combined there have been allergies to:

Dairy

Soy

Corn

Garlic

Cinnamon

Egg

Onions

Almonds

Cucumbers

Pears

Coconut

Rice

Green beans

Yeast

Glycerin

Pork

Carrots

Grapes

Oats

Citrus Fruits

 

As you can see, it's very difficult. The cheese, rice and bread fillers aren't as easy in our house. We can only do those things once a week, max. The first 6 are the ones we avoid the most, as every child has reacted to them. The rest aren't as insidious and don't seem to cause much reaction in them anymore. I avoid it all. I'm currently able to eat beef, tomatoes, apples, squash, potatoes, enjoy life chocolate, and barley (with only salt as seasoning). Every new thing I've tried beyond those so far has been a bust. We do make my meals separately. The rest of the family could never survive on only those things. I couldn't even do it if it didn't directly effect my life (colic!). And just about everything we make is from scratch (always for me when nursing, but usually for the rest, too) which is probably why I hate cooking so much. No "semi-homemade" for me. Sigh...




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