Do you, or someone you know personally, have a ZERO credit score like Dave Ramsey talks about? - Page 3 - Mothering Forums

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#61 of 172 Old 03-22-2011, 07:54 AM
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I am not sure how a credit card is going to protect me from life unexpected expenses. As some point it is going to have a cap on it whether it is $1.000, $10,000 or whatnot then what. What are you going to do after you tapped into all that credit and you still need more all you will have is all that debt? You are still back to square one. I have been there and done it. We are not interested in doing it any more. We have been through job lost and strike and survived without running up any more debt. It is a mindset that you have to have credit. I choose not to depend on the almighty dollar this way.

 

 

I feel like you are being deliberately obtuse. Do you really not see how an emergency would come up where you might need access to more money than you currently have? 

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#62 of 172 Old 03-22-2011, 09:54 AM
 
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In the case of a sick child, doesn't the hospital simply provide the service(s) and you then have a debt with them? I know many people who make monthly payments for births, surgeries, etc. to hospitals. I can't imagine the hospital cuts you off at some "credit limit." It costs what it costs and you pay it off when/if you can. Many people work out settlements with hospitals for this very reason, yes?

 

At no point would I tell the hospital, "Nope. I can't cover that expense with the funds I have today, please do not treat my child." I would pay for the rest of my life on whatever it cost to treat my child. I think CPS might actually get involved with parents who declined such medical treatment.

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#63 of 172 Old 03-22-2011, 09:55 AM
 
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I am not mum4boys but I don't think she is trying to be obtuse or intellectually dishonest. 

 

The main thing I could envisioning happening to my family that would completely tap out our resources for would be a huge medical castrope that would exceed my medical coverage.  However, I would view putting medical expenses on a credit card as an exercise in pointless "kicking the can down the road."  If I need to declare bankrupcy than I will declare bankrupcy with zero shame. I think her point was that if you have a truly life changing event incuring 7 figures how is having a credit card with a 10k credit limit going to alter things much?  You are going to need to find you help elsewhere.  

 

Also the most of the other senarios that I can think of where my resources would run out tend to be pretty "tinfoil hat wearing" and I am convinced that a credit card (mine or anyone elses) would merely be a 2X3 piece of plastic good for jimming locks or as a small scraping device.

 

 

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#64 of 172 Old 03-22-2011, 10:37 AM
 
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I can see both sides of this.  I wouldn't want zero credit, as in, I didn't exist with regards to credit bureaus.  However, that actually sounds more appealing than having bad credit, b/c at least then you could always build credit, I guess.

 

Anyhow, we don't have or use credit cards, and haven't for almost a decade now. FWIW, we can and have booked flights and hotel rooms many times w/o holds being placed on our debit cards. 

 

edited to delete tmi.  :)


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#65 of 172 Old 03-22-2011, 11:23 AM
 
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I am going to respectfully disagree with much of this post.  I have bought both a car and furniture in the past with 0% deals.  I am far from convinced that is was a good idea.

 

The furniture deal introduced stress into the whole purchase that would not have existed and in order to be super sure that we didn't get assessed any interest we ended up paying it after 10 month vs the 12 months that we techinically had.  It seemed like a lot of hassle to earn approximately $50 in interest.   Our most recent furniture purchase was a bed and mattress from a small business that also made the mattress and has an Amish cabinetmaker make the bed.  We paid with cash and got a discount of 5% on the purchase.

 

We also purchase a new vehicle with 0%.  We had the cash to buy it outright, but we chose not to use it. We did buy a vehicle more expensive than I know either DH or I would have ever bought if we had had enteedr the car dealership with a stack of $100 bills.  It was far from a terrible purchase and we still drive is 9 and 1/2 years later.  Still not our smartest move.  Also if you have the cash for a car or have excellent credit you are nearly always better off taking the higher rebate over the 0% financing.

 

Also anything purchased with a credit card has another layer of expense built into it.  Using credit cards raises retail prices for both the people that pay cash and use credit. If you are dealing with a small business owner you nearly always get a better deal if you pay with cash (and ask for a discount).  I have gotten cash discounts for lodging, furniture, food (both resturants, grocery stores, farmer's market).  The "free" money from rebate cards are really not so free because they are reflected in higher costs for everyone.  Statistically, people spend about 20 to 30% more when the pay with credit than they do with cash.

 

I also don't think paying cash makes you less inclined to invest and grow you net worth. If anything becoming less of a credit user has increased our rate of savings.  I currently live in a place with some pretty depressed real estate and relatively low household income.  The discipline to only buy a house with cash is keeping us from spending too much on a home.  We would easily qualify to buy a house twice that median here.  But overall that would be a crummy idea since the high end of the market moves at such a glacieral pace and we know we won't live here forever.

 

I don't think all debt is bad either. Both the student loan debt I took on and the 3 or 4 different mortgages we have had in the past have all worked out just fine for us.  We also have a credit card that we do use one or twice a year just to keep it active.  But mostly I think it is easier to be mindful when you use the green rectangular stuff.  I also think there are lots of ways to "leverage" using cash that aren't available when you use credit.  I do think there are multiple routes to monetary wealth and more than one way to do things.  Living within/below your means is the first place to start regardless of what actual means you used to pay with it.

 


First of all, about the 0% financing on cars.  I ran a calculation a long while back (after reading a particular financial planning book that I can't remember the name of right now) to see what is better... the rebate or the 0%.  This involves investing, so there is a return factor here.  Let's say over 25 years, you purchase 3 cars at the cost of $20,000 each.  By using 0% interest, not taking that $20,000 to pay all up-front and keeping that $20K working for you each time you purchase a car, in the end, over that 25 years, buying 3 vehicles and gaining average returns, you are $42,000 ahead of the game.  That is, each time you got a "rebate" on a car you purchase, you would have to get $14,000 taken off of the price to break even... over the LONG HAUL.  Not immediately.  You don't see those returns immediately.  The returns take 25 years to accumulate.  But when I am talking about using credit wisely to increase your net income, I'm not talking about today or 1 year from now or even 10 years from now.  You have to look at the big picture.  And for this picture...no, the rebate is not the best option.

 

And for us, it's a moot point because we don't buy brand new cars, which I personally think is not a sound financial move, anyway.  That $20,000 car is worth about $16,000 (on average) the moment you drive it off the lot.  You can argue that if you keep it 'til it dies, then it's worth it, but the one thing you can't predict is if it gets totaled in an accident the first year.  I had a colleague this happened to TWICE in one year.  She bought a brand new vehicle, it was totaled in an accident just a few months later.  She lost thousands on it.  Turned around and several months later, it happened again when her husband was driving.  Now in that accident he was badly injured, so they ended up with a settlement, but you can't predict these things.  I personally think (based on calculations again) that the wisest move it to buy certified pre-owned and pay cash.

 

Making sound money decisions, especially when credit is involved isn't something you can just kind of figure out in your head if you're going to try to build wealth.  And I mean BUILD wealth, not just idly save some money.  There is a mindset and yes, even $50 makes a difference.

 

So while it may not WORK for you, it is a proven financial fact that utilizing credit properly *does* help one, who is savvy, to gain the financial upper hand in their lives.  Yes mistakes can be made.  Yes, the "profit" may not seem to outweigh the "effort".  But to say it doesn't happen just because it didn't work for you... that doesn't make the principle false.

 

As for responsible people "paying 20% or 30% more" for something if you pay with credit.  Please... show me the study. Credit is not going to go away.  Just because *I* don't use it doesn't mean that retail prices are going to go down.  I might as well get my rewards and cash back.  When dh and I go out to dinner, the bill is going to be $80 whether we pay for it in cash or pay with credit.  If I don't use my credit card that one time, they're not going to cut me any slack.  If people pay 20% more because they don't take time to find a better deal, well that's just being financially irresponsible and they are probably going to be showing many more signs of financial distress that just paying more for something.

 

When you say that you get a 5% discount for paying in cash... that's no different than saying that they are upcharging for paying with credit.  Of course, in those cases, you do pay with cash.  However, that's all part of the plan of increasing your net worth.  You have to evaluate these financial decisions on a case-by-case basis.  And that was exactly what I was saying in my previous post.

 

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#66 of 172 Old 03-22-2011, 11:43 AM
 
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I feel like you are being deliberately obtuse. Do you really not see how an emergency would come up where you might need access to more money than you currently have? 



 



 



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I am not mum4boys but I don't think she is trying to be obtuse or intellectually dishonest. 

 

The main thing I could envisioning happening to my family that would completely tap out our resources for would be a huge medical castrope that would exceed my medical coverage.  However, I would view putting medical expenses on a credit card as an exercise in pointless "kicking the can down the road."  If I need to declare bankrupcy than I will declare bankrupcy with zero shame. I think her point was that if you have a truly life changing event incuring 7 figures how is having a credit card with a 10k credit limit going to alter things much?  You are going to need to find you help elsewhere.  

 

Also the most of the other senarios that I can think of where my resources would run out tend to be pretty "tinfoil hat wearing" and I am convinced that a credit card (mine or anyone elses) would merely be a 2X3 piece of plastic good for jimming locks or as a small scraping device.

 

 



 mnnice that is exactly what I am saying. I am going to say this again. Credit Cards have been nothing but trouble for us. I have been married for over 21 years. I have experience. We can go into it with the best intentions and it has always wound up costing us for whatever reason some cases it was stupidity and other cases it was things beyong our control. For us being debt free not having any consumer loans etc. is the best decision we have made for our family. It has not held us back in anyway and has freed us in many ways. As I have said before you, have to decide what is best for your family but to say you cannot live without credit is a myth. There are plenty of people doing it.

 

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In the case of a sick child, doesn't the hospital simply provide the service(s) and you then have a debt with them? I know many people who make monthly payments for births, surgeries, etc. to hospitals. I can't imagine the hospital cuts you off at some "credit limit." It costs what it costs and you pay it off when/if you can. Many people work out settlements with hospitals for this very reason, yes?

 

At no point would I tell the hospital, "Nope. I can't cover that expense with the funds I have today, please do not treat my child." I would pay for the rest of my life on whatever it cost to treat my child. I think CPS might actually get involved with parents who declined such medical treatment.



 

That is exactly right. We have never been denied medical care because we could not pay up front.


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#67 of 172 Old 03-22-2011, 11:59 AM
 
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I am not mum4boys but I don't think she is trying to be obtuse or intellectually dishonest. 

 

The main thing I could envisioning happening to my family that would completely tap out our resources for would be a huge medical castrope that would exceed my medical coverage.  However, I would view putting medical expenses on a credit card as an exercise in pointless "kicking the can down the road."  If I need to declare bankrupcy than I will declare bankrupcy with zero shame. I think her point was that if you have a truly life changing event incuring 7 figures how is having a credit card with a 10k credit limit going to alter things much?  You are going to need to find you help elsewhere.  

 

Also the most of the other senarios that I can think of where my resources would run out tend to be pretty "tinfoil hat wearing" and I am convinced that a credit card (mine or anyone elses) would merely be a 2X3 piece of plastic good for jimming locks or as a small scraping device.

 

 

 

 

I wouldn't put medical expenses on a credit card, but some places dont' have a  ronald mcdonalds childrens hospital attached, and I have friends who have had to book a hotel room to stay near their child having surgery.  Or parking fees.  THere are times when you could run out of cash temporarily and need access to credit.  I am surprised people believe that could never happen in their lives.  Maybe you have family resources that could keep you afloat?  (In that case, 'those' people are probably using credit, so it's not as if you aren't really part of the machine...)

 

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I think it's silly to say one cannot live without credit. My ILs have never had credit cards or credit available, and when their kids got sick (heck, they didn't even believe in medical insurance!) they just ran a bill with the hospital, paid it off slowly, and negotiated. Most places will negotiate with people who don't have insurance or credit cards, IME. It's not how I would have done it, but they managed to raise 7 kids with some serious health crises and never go bankrupt. 

 

As for me, I don't see how credit could help me in those circumstances people keep describing. I have as much cash on hand as I could qualify for credit for. Meaning- I have at least $XX,XXX in the bank right now, and I know if I were to apply for credit, I would not qualify for more than that. How could that credit card help me in an emergency, then?


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#69 of 172 Old 03-22-2011, 12:13 PM
 
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It is a bit puzzling to me to say one will need a credit card to pay for parking or a hotel room for an emergency. First off you have a plan with savings in it for emergencies. Second, as stated before my child spends a lot of time in the hospital, we have never rented a hotel room because we have always stayed with our son in his room whether he stayed for 4 days or 30 days.


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Wow, this has been an interesting thread. I'm sorry to see it's been heated in parts, but both sides of both debates have given me much to think about.

 

Personally, I'm in the camp that the 0% financing is not worth it. You could do the math and tell me that it works out, but the math depends on several what-if factors, and the math also assumes the best case scenario. DH and I did 0% financing of a dishwasher a few years ago, and while we got away with it, we paid it off in 10 months instead of 12 and swore "never again." They can play games with you, screw you on the smallest mistake, and even if you don't make any mistake, you are still vulnerable to them (I'd be surprised if no 0% financier has ever "not processed" a payment in time, if you know what I mean). It also assumes that your investments will always win out during the period in question. I think that perhaps people with a lot of money to play with may indeed be able to count on that, but DH and I don't have a portfolio worthy of a manager, and we are not investing experts. So these factors can be different for different people. Personally, I prefer to eliminate that risk and know I'm on solid ground when I buy with cash - it's done and over with and does not affect my future.

 

I've thought about credit for emergencies, and this thread has helped me to feel more that it's not necessary and not the solution. It's difficult to embrace that emotionally though. Up until a certain point of an emergency, credit is still not necessary - other things can be done. Past a certain point of an emergency, it won't even help you. It's an interesting point to ponder.

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It is a bit puzzling to me to say one will need a credit card to pay for parking or a hotel room for an emergency. First off you have a plan with savings in it for emergencies. Second, as stated before my child spends a lot of time in the hospital, we have never rented a hotel room because we have always stayed with our son in his room whether he stayed for 4 days or 30 days.

Maybe you have a  much larger emergency fund than most people?  I don't know of many hosptials that allow both parents (and other siblings if need be) to stay overnight.  My experience has always been one person overnight.  My friend I mentioned, had to drive to a special children's hospital 5 hours away (extra gas, lodging, etc).  Her child could not have the surgery done at a local hospital.  I know they have needed to use their credit cards from time to time, because they depleted their emergency fund long ago (pretty sick kid). 

 

 

I hope you never find yourself in need of extra cash, since you seem very opposed to the idea of credit.  Good luck!
 

 

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It is a bit puzzling to me to say one will need a credit card to pay for parking or a hotel room for an emergency. First off you have a plan with savings in it for emergencies. Second, as stated before my child spends a lot of time in the hospital, we have never rented a hotel room because we have always stayed with our son in his room whether he stayed for 4 days or 30 days.


See, this is the type of statement that makes it seem like you are being obtuse to try to make your point.

 

Let's take the very simple act of paying for parking for an unexpected hospital stay.  For this scenario let's say I have no credit OR debit cards because you need a credit history to obtain a debit card.

 

On any given day I usually have $100-150 in cash on me but I'm guessing that's more than average.  Let's say I'm running errands so I've spent some cash and get a call that DS needs to go to the hospital so I drive there to meet him and I have $50 on me.


We're there for 4 hours.  During this time I need to eat (hypoglycemic) and I need to buy food at the hospital.  Let's say $10.  If we assume I started with $50, I'm now at $40.

 

Now DS needs to be transfered to another hospital, downtown.  I drive behind the ambulance.  But I was out running errands and need gas.  Let's say I get a quarter of a tank to conserve cash so $15.  Now I have $35.  I would have grabbed cash but there was no ATM at the gas station and I don't want to delay any further.

 

Downtown, running tests, must get more food for me, another $10.  So now $25.  Of course, I had to park in the hospital parking garage because there was no on street parking available.

 

DS is admitted, it is late and I decide to get home so DH can drop me off at the hospital and have the car for the day to get to work.  Let's say he got a ride home from a friend the previous day but can't do that in the morning.  I go to leave in the middle of the night and parking is $35.  The one ATM there is broken.  You have no credit cards.  What do you do?

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#73 of 172 Old 03-22-2011, 03:58 PM
 
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See, this is the type of statement that makes it seem like you are being obtuse to try to make your point.

 

Let's take the very simple act of paying for parking for an unexpected hospital stay.  For this scenario let's say I have no credit OR debit cards because you need a credit history to obtain a debit card.

 

On any given day I usually have $100-150 in cash on me but I'm guessing that's more than average.  Let's say I'm running errands so I've spent some cash and get a call that DS needs to go to the hospital so I drive there to meet him and I have $50 on me.


We're there for 4 hours.  During this time I need to eat (hypoglycemic) and I need to buy food at the hospital.  Let's say $10.  If we assume I started with $50, I'm now at $40.

 

Now DS needs to be transfered to another hospital, downtown.  I drive behind the ambulance.  But I was out running errands and need gas.  Let's say I get a quarter of a tank to conserve cash so $15.  Now I have $35.  I would have grabbed cash but there was no ATM at the gas station and I don't want to delay any further.

 

Downtown, running tests, must get more food for me, another $10.  So now $25.  Of course, I had to park in the hospital parking garage because there was no on street parking available.

 

DS is admitted, it is late and I decide to get home so DH can drop me off at the hospital and have the car for the day to get to work.  Let's say he got a ride home from a friend the previous day but can't do that in the morning.  I go to leave in the middle of the night and parking is $35.  The one ATM there is broken.  You have no credit cards.  What do you do?

 

Thank you for taking the time to spell out what I mean.  I think having a credit card for emergencies makes sense - especially with young children.  I would rather have the credit card available then not be able to feed my kids.   We don't use our credit cards on a regular basis, but they have been priceless when we've actually truly needed one. 
 

 

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 No, I am not going into debt. Is that statement hard to understand? We only spend within our means. For us that means what we can pay for cash in hand. If we do not have the cash then we do not buy it. It is that simple. How do you equate that I was unable to take care of a sick child because I would not take out any debt? 


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That is exactly right. We have never been denied medical care because we could not pay up front.

 

I'm confused. So what did you do when you couldn't pay up front for the medical care? Did you take on debt with the hospital?
 

 

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In the hospital scenario, where the ATM is "broken" , couldn't one use their debit card with a Visa/MC logo? Why must one use a CREDIT card to get food or pay for parking if they don't have cash on them? If you have a smart phone (I do, which I got without credit, without a high deposit lol) you can do a transfer in about 2.5 seconds if you needed to transfer money from savings into checking or whathaveyou -- or set your account up to use money from savings if you happen to have a defecit in your checking (unexpected expenses that "come up").  I don't see that scenario as a reason someone NEEDS credit.

 

I have a problem with the assumption that people NEED credit or access to it. If people just said, 'hey, we use credit responsibly, it benefits us, etc'...I'm in the 'live and let live' camp. It's your life. I make no value judgments on people who use credit responsibly and claim it's a benefit to them. My issue is with the assumption that people NEED (as in, are incapable of living a happy, financially-free, secure, or otherwise fiscally responsible or beneficial life without) credit. That's simply not been true for my family or for the other families who commented, or for the other families who live this way as an intentional, mindful, and informed choice to not play the credit game.

 

 


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...

Let's take the very simple act of paying for parking for an unexpected hospital stay.  For this scenario let's say I have no credit OR debit cards because you need a credit history to obtain a debit card......



 



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In the hospital scenario, where the ATM is "broken" , couldn't one use their debit card with a Visa/MC logo? Why must one use a CREDIT card to get food or pay for parking if they don't have cash on them? If you have a smart phone (I do, which I got without credit, without a high deposit lol) you can do a transfer in about 2.5 seconds if you needed to transfer money from savings into checking or whathaveyou -- or set your account up to use money from savings if you happen to have a defecit in your checking (unexpected expenses that "come up").  I don't see that scenario as a reason someone NEEDS credit.

 

I have a problem with the assumption that people NEED credit or access to it. If people just said, 'hey, we use credit responsibly, it benefits us, etc'...I'm in the 'live and let live' camp. It's your life. I make no value judgments on people who use credit responsibly and claim it's a benefit to them. My issue is with the assumption that people NEED (as in, are incapable of living a happy, financially-free, secure, or otherwise fiscally responsible or beneficial life without) credit. That's simply not been true for my family or for the other families who commented, or for the other families who live this way as an intentional, mindful, and informed choice to not play the credit game.

 

 



Please see the bolded part of my post above.  You NEED established credit to obtain a debit card.  They run a credit check before issuing one.

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#77 of 172 Old 03-22-2011, 05:30 PM
 
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That is absolutely false about needing credit to have a debit card.  

 All of our medical expenses are paid out of pocket at the time of service. Seattle Children's allows personal checks to be written for cash once a day for the parents of patients. I am sure other hospitals have the same policy. This line of questioning is kind of ludacris. There are all kinds of scenarios one can go through if you have credit cards. What happens if your wallet is stolen on the way to this emergency? What are you going to do then? Seriously I do not live my life full of what ifs. We plan for what we can but we do not worry about some scenario that has about as much chances as happening as winning the lottery.


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Maybe each state is different but here a credit report is run.  As I said upthread somewhere, I was not able to get one at first because of things my ex did (he eventually faced felony embezzlement charges, very long story but his actions messed with my credit for a while) I was denied, had to wait 6 months while using only a regular/plain ATM card, then reapply.  I did get approved then but only after 6 months of history with the bank in question.


If I lost my wallet and was completely stranded without help from family or friends?  I'd call Amex after hours and my bank during regular business hours.

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#79 of 172 Old 03-22-2011, 05:35 PM
 
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This is from Bank of America's website which I do believe is the largest bank in America.

 

Do I need good credit to get an airline Debit Card? No. There are no credit requirements. All you need is a Bank of America checking account.

 

 

http://www.bankofamerica.com/deposits/checksave/index.cfm?template=lc_faq_checkcards 


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Originally Posted by ChristyMarie View Post

Maybe each state is different but here a credit report is run.  As I said upthread somewhere, I was not able to get one at first because of things my ex did (he eventually faced felony embezzlement charges, very long story but his actions messed with my credit for a while) I was denied, had to wait 6 months while using only a regular/plain ATM card, then reapply.  I did get approved then but only after 6 months of history with the bank in question.


If I lost my wallet and was completely stranded without help from family or friends?  I'd call Amex after hours and my bank during regular business hours.



So why would it be any different for someone who does not use a credit card? I did not say we did not use the bank, I said we did not use credit cards.

 


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Originally Posted by mum4boys View Post

This is from Bank of America's website which I do believe is the largest bank in America.

 

Do I need good credit to get an airline Debit Card? No. There are no credit requirements. All you need is a Bank of America checking account.

 

 

http://www.bankofamerica.com/deposits/checksave/index.cfm?template=lc_faq_checkcards 



Hey, I'm real glad you posted this, b/c we use our BoA debit card every day.  I don't know why I never noticed this option before, but I'm going to sign up right now (it's a $30 annual fee - but it seems like it would be worth it).  Thanks, mum4boys!

 

eta: even Disney has a rewards debit card, so maybe more places are giving out points to non-credit card users?  I also have a Target debit card as well as one for gas at Shell.  Both offer discounts for using them, so even though the money comes right out of my checking account, it's worth it to carry around the extra cards. 


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Please see the bolded part of my post above.  You NEED established credit to obtain a debit card.  They run a credit check before issuing one.



This is absolutely 100% false. You do not need established credit to obtain a debit card. Give me some resources on that "information" please.

 

 

 

Quote:

Can I get a Visa Debit card even if I don’t qualify for credit?

Yes, you do not need to qualify for credit to receive a Visa Debit card. You just need an eligible checking account. The funds are deducted directly from your checking account and not borrowed.

 

http://usa.visa.com/personal/cards/debit/visa_check_cards_faq.html#anchor_5 

 

That's from another site than the pp mentioned.




 

 


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#83 of 172 Old 03-22-2011, 06:28 PM
 
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I think it's silly to say one cannot live without credit. My ILs have never had credit cards or credit available, and when their kids got sick (heck, they didn't even believe in medical insurance!) they just ran a bill with the hospital, paid it off slowly, and negotiated. Most places will negotiate with people who don't have insurance or credit cards, IME. It's not how I would have done it, but they managed to raise 7 kids with some serious health crises and never go bankrupt. 

 

As for me, I don't see how credit could help me in those circumstances people keep describing. I have as much cash on hand as I could qualify for credit for. Meaning- I have at least $XX,XXX in the bank right now, and I know if I were to apply for credit, I would not qualify for more than that. How could that credit card help me in an emergency, then?

This is credit.
 

 

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It's really interesting to see the reactions people have when people say they don't use credit. It says a lot about society. Again, I have no issue with people who use credit, especially if they use it wisely (I don't pay their bills or live their lives, after all). There just seems to be this ... hostility almost... toward people who choose not to involve themselves with it as an intentional choice (for whatever personal, ethical, or even practical reason). I find it interesting.

 

It's the same kind of attitude I see toward people who live a minimalist lifestyle. Like the very act of choosing not use credit (or have a lot of 'stuff') is some sort of value judgment against people who do. Like they have to defend their choice to use credit (or have stuff). It's really not necessary. As long as we're all happy with how we've chosen to live, what's the problem?

 

It's the misinformation and fear-based comments that get to me. Like, one can't possibly survive in society at all without a good credit rating, or "established credit" -- and that's simply not the case (yet lol).


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Originally Posted by Tumble Bumbles View Post

It's really interesting to see the reactions people have when people say they don't use credit. It says a lot about society. Again, I have no issue with people who use credit, especially if they use it wisely (I don't pay their bills or live their lives, after all). There just seems to be this ... hostility almost... toward people who choose not to involve themselves with it as an intentional choice (for whatever personal, ethical, or even practical reason). I find it interesting.

 

It's the same kind of attitude I see toward people who live a minimalist lifestyle. Like the very act of choosing not use credit (or have a lot of 'stuff') is some sort of value judgment against people who do. Like they have to defend their choice to use credit (or have stuff). It's really not necessary. As long as we're all happy with how we've chosen to live, what's the problem?

 

It's the misinformation and fear-based comments that get to me. Like, one can't possibly survive in society at all without a good credit rating, or "established credit" -- and that's simply not the case (yet lol).



I have to agree with you. I do not understand the attitudes either. People should be allowed to live their lives as they see fit. It reminds me when my 3rd child was about to be born. and I casually said we were not going to use bottles, people just freaked out like somehow me just breast feeding our child was some how an attack on how they parented. (this was 13 years ago)

 


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That is absolutely false about needing credit to have a debit card.  

 All of our medical expenses are paid out of pocket at the time of service. Seattle Children's allows personal checks to be written for cash once a day for the parents of patients. I am sure other hospitals have the same policy. This line of questioning is kind of ludacris. There are all kinds of scenarios one can go through if you have credit cards. What happens if your wallet is stolen on the way to this emergency? What are you going to do then? Seriously I do not live my life full of what ifs. We plan for what we can but we do not worry about some scenario that has about as much chances as happening as winning the lottery.


My daughter's surgery was upwards of 100,000  - I don't have that kind of money sitting in my checking account.

 

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My daughter's surgery was upwards of 100,000  - I don't have that kind of money sitting in my checking account.

 



and???? you put it on a credit card?

 


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I have to agree with you. I do not understand the attitudes either. People should be allowed to live their lives as they see fit. It reminds me when my 3rd child was about to be born. and I casually said we were not going to use bottles, people just freaked out like somehow me just breast feeding our child was some how an attack on how they parented. (this was 13 years ago)

 


Borrowing or "credit" has been around since the beginning of time, but bottles haven't.  I swear, I am not responding on this thread because I feel defensive.  I just think, as a previous poster said, that you are being deliberately obtuse - and that in fact you don use "credit" although perhaps not in the form of a bank owned credit card. I don't think a credit card is "neccessary", but I think 'access' to one is.  I have never used bottles, either and my oldest is 12 ;)

 

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and???? you put it on a credit card?

 


no, but we did owe 20% of that, which we did not write a check for.  We had "credit" with the hospital. 

 

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#90 of 172 Old 03-22-2011, 08:09 PM
 
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what does that have to do with the the original topic or the fact we have chosen to go debt free? Your finances does not have anything to do with my finances nor how we choose to live our lives. As previously stated we had almost maxed out Liam's lifetime cap on our insurance. We still did not charge anything.


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