If you spend <$25 per person per week on groceries... - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

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#31 of 46 Old 05-12-2011, 02:53 PM
 
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1. Do you buy any natural or organic foods? We mostly buy whole foods and cook from scratch, but not to the degree of grinding our own flour and baking our own bread all the time. I do grind my own flour for some meals, but we don't eat bread that often. I buy it for those times. I do grind my own powdered sugar (organic) for those random times. Go figure. LOL We buy a mix of organic and non-organic; nearly everything is "natural" versus processed...

 

2. What do you do for fruits and vegetables?  (frozen, canned, fresh? wide variety or just the cheapest stuff?) We have a year-round CSA, so we eat mostly local, organic, in season fruits and veggies. We supplement a bit here and there with fresh. We never buy canned veggies (due to taste more than anything else), but do buy canned fruit once in awhile. We buy frozen organic corn at Trader Joe's and sometimes other veggies we don't get from our CSA. We also grow some produce. We eat a lot of fresh produce.

 

3. What do you eat for breakfasts? All sorts of things! Not real picky about the "traditional" breakfast foods. My favorite is spinach and other greens omelets in coconut oil.

 

4. What do you eat for snacks? All sorts of things! Carrots and fruit are my favorites. Carrots for the CRUNCH; fruit for it's natural sweetness. Nuts, too, for the fill-factor.

 

5. If you're in the US, how does your location's food costs compare to the national average? (go to http://www.bestplaces.net search for your location, then click the "cost of living" link above the Overview table.)

Our location is 148 overall. Food is 103.

 

We are a family of 3 plus a raw food fed cat. DD eats more than I do! We used to spend $335 per month on average, which is ~$26/person and includes our CSA and all other food (including the cat's). That didn't include our dining out category, which I have been slowly lowering over the years. This year (2011), I increased our food budget (still includes CSA and all other food, except dining out) to $350 per month on average, which puts us ~$27/person. I lowered our dining out category yet again. We're doing well and our overall food costs keep going down while our quality of food has increased. Anyway, our $26-27 per person per week average works with the comparison cost of living of 103.

 

When we travel and/or camp, our food choices are altered a bit. We eat more simply and add a few more convenience tactics/foods. I thought it was "bad" until we recently camped with Girl Scouts and I was in charge of buying the food for our troop. OH MY! The foods these other leaders wanted and the way we compromised our ordinary food & environmental practices values made me really reevaluate the way I judge myself. Also made me realize what some working mothers face with their own ideas of "quality time" and how they compromise meals to spend more time with their children. Tough choices!!!


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#32 of 46 Old 05-12-2011, 03:27 PM
 
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We have an interesting food situation...for just food though I think we spend about $20 per person per week.  There are 3 girls (8, 11, 14) and me and my friend who eats over here about 3-7 nights a week.    We also have a neighbor girl who has after school snacks and dinner at least once a week.  

 

Some things I do to save money:

almond milk instead of dairy milk.  Longer shelf life, smaller containers, shelf stable before it is open.  We never lose any to expiration.  

We do not drink milk or juice.  Milk is for cereal only.

I shop at sams.  for almost everything.  and I will admit it.  walmart.

I work at a grocery store which makes it easy for me to stock up when there is a sale. I also get meat for cheap and only eat meat of cheap meat is available.

I have a garden during the summer.

 

I am not including any non food items in that total.  No dog food or kitty litter or cosmetics.  Just the people food.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by laurac5 View Post

1. Do you buy any natural or organic foods?

 

2. What do you do for fruits and vegetables?  (frozen, canned, fresh? wide variety or just the cheapest stuff?)

 

3. What do you eat for breakfasts?

 

4. What do you eat for snacks?

 

5. If you're in the US, how does your location's food costs compare to the national average? (go to http://www.bestplaces.net, search for your location, then click the "cost of living" link above the Overview table.)

 

 

My family of 2 adults and 1 toddler (who eats 1/4-1/2 an adult serving) is stuck at $75ish a week (although that includes non-food items) and I'm looking for some ways to shave that down a bit.  Our food cost of living is 109% the national average.

 

Update: Changed the post title to be cost per person... I definitely did not think about the fact that for a family of 4, $50/week  would be incredibly tight!

 

Thanks!


1.  Some, not a lot.  If the price is within a few cents or cheaper I go organic but otherwise we go normal or do without.

 

2.  I do a lot of fresh and a lot of frozen.  Some canned but not a lot.

 

3.  My kids eat cereal and I eat a protein bar.  My schedule at worked changed today so I will now have time to make them eat something better.  LOL  

 

4.  snacks - fruit, veg, cheese, crackers, pickles (I get gallon jars of pickles for $4), popcorn is a favorite.  

 

5.  I can't get the link to work so I don't know how we compare but I think we are in the middle.

 


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#33 of 46 Old 05-19-2011, 11:02 AM
 
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Family of 5 with one on the way (so DH, Myself, 6yo, 4yo, 2yo).  We spend $100/week at the store and that has to cover everything from food to soap to toilet paper to whatever.  DD1 has celiac disease which limits our options a bit and affects the budget somewhat.  (we can't have gluten in the house, so nothing with wheat, barley, or rye or things made with derivatives like food starch).  We don't eat a lot of meat...maybe 1-2 times a week with red meat 3-4 times a year.  We have chickens so that helps.

 

1. Do you buy any natural or organic foods?

--- some.  We buy organic soy milk and during the summer/fall we participate in an organic/local CSA.  Other than that, cost is the bottom line so I tend to buy seasonal/local rather than organic.

 

2. What do you do for fruits and vegetables?  (frozen, canned, fresh? wide variety or just the cheapest stuff?)

--During the growing season we get all our veggies fresh on the farm.  We can, freeze, and dry some produce and during the "off" season make do with apples and other "winter" fruit.  Frozen fruit is a big treat, and exotic fresh fruits (bananas, kiwis, and so on) is also a treat.  Melons and other summer/fall goodies are generally eaten in season till we're stuffed!

 

3. What do you eat for breakfasts?

--hot oatmeal (use a slow cooker and make it while we sleep), hot rice (brown rice is a wonderful hot breakfast, just treat it like oatmeal), lots of eggs (we have chickens), sometimes cold cereal or yogurt.

 

4. What do you eat for snacks?

--apple slices with peanut butter, rice cakes with hummus, carrots, yogurt

 

5. If you're in the US, how does your location's food costs compare to the national average? (go to http://www.bestplaces.net, search for your location, then click the "cost of living" link above the Overview table.)

--a bit high at 104

 


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#34 of 46 Old 05-20-2011, 08:30 PM
 
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We are still spending around $100/week for two adults and we do share with our roommate occasionally. (Though he feeds us some as well).  We get $300/month of food stamps, and it usually runs out 7-10 days before the end of the  month.  My goal is to not spend any non-food stamp money on food.

 

 

 

1. Do you buy any natural or organic foods?
Natural when we can, but most things like that are too expensive!


2. What do you do for fruits and vegetables? (frozen, canned, fresh? wide variety or just the cheapest stuff?)
I will get frozen veggies, and we drink a lot of juice and V8 Fusion.  Hubby hates veggies, so that's about as healthy as I can get him to be.


3. What do you eat for breakfasts?

I am not a breakfast person, and neither is he.  Right now, I have a cup of black tea and a Fiber One bar.

4. What do you eat for snacks?
Too much junk.  Trying to work on that. Marshmallows are good, toast, eggs.


5. If you're in the US, how does your location's food costs compare to the national average? (go to http://www.bestplaces.net, search for your location, then click the "cost of living" link above the Overview table.)
 

According to that site, out area is 9.20% below the national average.

 

 


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#35 of 46 Old 05-21-2011, 06:56 PM
 
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I have a household of 6.5 (3 adults, 3.5 kids I promise they eat as much as their pregnant momma), I shop once a month for almost everything. Milk, eggs, produce is weekly.

 

My budget is $34  but I spend approx $27/ person/ week or $160/ week for 6 people

 

I buy 95% organic,

produce is a mix of fresh, frozen and canned - depends on cost

breakfast  - the adults eat egg sandwiches with cheese almost daily, kids eat eggs (they eat 3each!), oatmeal, english muffins, french toast, bagels etc

snacks are fruit, veggies, jelly bread, chips and salsa, cheese, crackers, raisins, nuts, popcorn, quesadillas, grilled cheese

 

We do almost no processed foods, I go to 5 different stores knowing what is cheaper where (that includes a bakery "day-old" store and barely anything from wal-mart type)  buying monthly saves a TON - money and time (It takes me 4 hours once a month) , we don't eat meat, we drink water, tea, coffee, lunches are kinda snacky or leftovers, I buy flour, sugar, nuts, etc from the bulk section.

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#36 of 46 Old 05-24-2011, 02:56 PM
 
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Dmitrizmom-That is so helpful. Thank you!

Could anyone else share more specifics like meal plans?

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#37 of 46 Old 05-24-2011, 03:09 PM
 
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Tonight we are having :

 

Rice with carrots, celery and green beans  3.00 bag of rice

Bag of frozen green beans on sale 10-10, Carrots 3.00 organic, celery 2.49

Turkey Luncheon meat with gravy 1.50 sale and coupon

 

So, for one meal for 2 adults and 3 children, we will use all the luncheon meat, half bag of green beans, 2 carrots, 2 celery stalks= 3.50 for the family

I stock on sale items, so I can save down the road. This is one of our cheaper meals.

 

We buy 2 bags of carrots every 2 weeks, one baby cut and one regular bag

10 bags of frozen veggies will last between 2weeks to a month, depending on how much fresh we have

Celery lasts us 2 weeks

 

 


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#38 of 46 Old 05-24-2011, 06:30 PM
 
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Tonight, we had Indian curried chickpeas, basmati rice, and curried eggplant.  It's not quite eggplant season here, so these are just grocery store eggplant, at about $1/lb, and that was the pricey part of the meal.  Chickpeas cooked from dry(a$1.48/lb), basmati rice bought from the bullk bin, and the eggplant.  All the spices were bought from the bulk bin.  The onions, ginger, and garlic were from our international market.  I did use tomato paste bought on sale in January at a rocking sale, where I think I paid like $0.10/can.  I also used some tomatoes frozen from last year's garden. 


Total cost (for 2 adults, 3 children, plus 2 lunches) was about $4.00.

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#39 of 46 Old 05-25-2011, 05:56 PM
 
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1. Do you buy any natural or organic foods? I  buy mostly "natural" things I think, in that I buy ingredients and turn them into meals.  I rarely buy organic

 

2. What do you do for fruits and vegetables?  (frozen, canned, fresh? wide variety or just the cheapest stuff?) Mostly fresh, although I keep some frozen corn and peas in the fridge because they're hard to get fresh and good most of the year.  I also keep some canned mandrin oranges in the cupboard because dh likes them.  Only canned veggies are tomatoes and tomato paste.  We generally have a decent variety of fruit, chosen from what's on sale on any given week.  Usually at least bananas, apples, and some sort of citrus.  Currently watermelon.  Soon to be strawberries. We always have carrots and onions and a few other vegetables depending on season and sales. I buy frozen mixed berries most of the year for breakfasts and smoothies.

 

3. What do you eat for breakfasts?  I eat berries, granola, and homemade yogurt.   Dh eats granola and milk, whatever fruit is in the bowl, and toast.  The kids eat toast or oatmeal or whatever cereal I've bought cheaply.  Generally store brand cheerios, corn flakes or rice krispies or puffed wheat.  Dh drinks oj or grapefruit juice, the kids drink oj or apple juice, and I drink coffee with milk. Dd likes smoothies for breakfast on weekends.

 

4. What do you eat for snacks?  Fruit, raw veggies, homemade muffins or cookies, popcorn, slice of bread and pb.  Dh eats about 10 pieces of fruit per day.  Ds and dd take cheese sticks for snacks at school.  Hardboiled eggs when eggs have been on sale.  Almonds are a favourite of ds.

 

5. If you're in the US, how does your location's food costs compare to the national average? (go to http://www.bestplaces.net, search for your location, then click the "cost of living" link above the Overview table.) Not in US, but in Canada prices tend to be more expensive than just south of the border in the US, especially meat, eggs, and dairy.

 

There are 6 of us.  Dh (who eats a ton), me (normal adult portions), ds12, dd9, dd7, dd3 (average for kids their ages I guess).



I budget $600/month, which is about $140/week.  I don't spend $140 every week though.  Once a month I go to costco and spend about $100 there alone on whole wheat flour, white flour, nuts, raisins, sugar, cheeses, sour cream, cottage cheese, cocoa, cereal, coffee, fresh spinach, frozen tortellini for a lazy supper, laundry soap, dishwasher detergent (I don't buy it all every month), pickles, jarred red peppers, olives.   I spend about $100 other weeks in other grocery stores.  I live within a mile or so of most of the major chains so I shop around on foot in summer and once a week in the car in winter.  I buy a lot of my produce from a produce only store, which is cheaper than grocery stores around here.

 

Our suppers for this week:

-veggie curry, basmati rice, homemade naan

-lentil spinach soup, spinach salad, grilled cheese on homemade bread for the kids

-pork tenderloin, mac and cheese, steamed broccoli and cauliflower (fresh, half a bunch of each leftover from other meals)

-cabbage/mushroom/tofu stir fry over basmati rice (rice, carrot sticks, leftover pork for picky kids)

-pizza (homemade crust, sauce made from tomato paste, mozza cheese, veggies left in fridge)

-tacos (meat cooked in large batch and from freezer, pintos cooked in large batch from dry and in freezer, cheese, lettuce, tomatoes, salsa from jar or homemade when tomatoes are in season, sour cream, guacamole made from avocados, homemade flour tortillas since the kids don't like corn tortillas)

-eggs, bacon (on sale this week), toast (homemade bread), fruit

 

I don't eat meat so I have leftovers from a previous night or skip that part of the meal when we have it.

 

I will add that my grocery prices are substantially higher than many people have mentioned earlier on the thread, and that's even with buying on sale.  My biggest tip for keeping down the grocery bill is to decide what you're eating based on what's cheapest and to stock up on staples when they're on sale, and know what a good price is so you know when to stock up.  I buy at least 6lbs when butter is $3/lb (rock bottom around here) and at least 3 dozen eggs when they're 3/$5 (rock bottom for here).  Regular price for butter is $4 and up per lb.  Eggs are $2.69/dozen regularly in grocery stores.  If they're not on sale, we do more baking with muffins that require oil, have less meals based around eggs, buy eggs at costco for $2.20/dozen. Meat gets purchased on sale and planned in that weeks groceries plus an extra for the freezer.  If there are no good meat sales, I don't buy any, plan more vegetarian meals, and defrost something from the freezer.  I make most of our bread, so I buy yeast in a 1lb package for about the same cost as the 1/4lb glass jars.  I keep a jar's worth in the fridge and the rest resealed in the freezer.  When I buy bread, I buy it from a bakery outlet or a local organic bakery that sells their day old stuff 50% off from their freezer.  Milk is always $5.54 for 4L (about a gallon), so I don't let the kids drink glass after glass at meal times.  We still go through 3 gallons per week between yogurt making, cooking, drinking, and cereal.

 

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#40 of 46 Old 05-26-2011, 12:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kittywitty View Post

Dmitrizmom-That is so helpful. Thank you!

Could anyone else share more specifics like meal plans?



Our meal plan this week (all dinners cover 6 people plus a lunch for my husband):

 

Dinners

Chili and salad     $9 (one pack ground turkey bought on sale, home canned tomaoes, canned beans bough on sale - the pot of chili will do 2 full meals (lunch and dinner) so cost per person/meal is less than $1.

Grilled Chicken Kabobs with rice    $8 (4 chicken breasts bought on sale, $1 rice, $2 for veggies pepper, onion, mushrooms, cherry tomatoes $1 marinade ingredients)

Veggie Stir Fry   $5 ($1 rice, veggies include carrots, celery, broc, zuchini, yellow pepper, snap peas and any other random leftover bits, topped with toasted sesame seeds and almonds)  

Homemade pizza   $5-6 (cheese bought on sale and shredded - this is the biggest expense for the pizza dinner - toppings are veggies, olives, and a bit of leftover bacon, I make my own dough and sauce which cost about $1 per meal)

Apple and Sausage Salad   $7 (1 pack of turkey sausage bought on sale, 2 large heads romain plus a few greens just coming up in the garden, 3 apples, 1 red pepper, celery, green onions, dressing made from maple syrup, vinegar and olive oil)

Pork tenderloin $6 (pork bought on sale, done in the crock pot), garlicy baked potato fries, steamed carrots and broccoli.

Sunday dinner - we're having friends so will be feeding 10 people -likely will make Chicken Pot Pie which costs us less than $10 for a lasagna tray size, plus fruit crisp from home canned fruit, rhubarb from the garden etc cost $4  They will bring salad.  Wine (home brewed) and beer $6 (not included in the groc budget)

 

Dinners for the week: $55 to make 65 servings

 

Lunches this week for the kids and I (we homeschool which makes cheap lunches easier):

black bean and orzo salad - $5 dollars will cover 2 lunches

foccacia and salad $3

broccoli soup and cheese biscuit $2 (make from ends of broc plus 1/2 a head, one onion, one carrot, one potato, frozen stock, dollop of homemade yogurt - its basically free - lol)

left over chili and leftover salad (factored above)

weekend lunches - tomato/lettuce/avocado sandwhich on homemade bread $2-3? depends on how much tomatoes are at the market 

turkey soup (frozen leftovers from Easter) $3ish (hard to quantify soup  from leftovers)

$16 to make 37 servings

 

For breakfasts I make up a big batch of granola which costs about $5-6 for a week's supply, 3 litres of yogurt $3, muffins $2-3 for a week's supply, dozen eggs $2.50, tray of baked oatmeal $2 and I bake a couple of loaves of bread $1 or less per loaf, and we supplement with fruit (mostly home canned or frozen).  The kids basically help themselves.

$20-22 for the week depending on fruit.  

 

Snacks

fruit, veggies and dip, popcorn, cheese and crackers, yogurt, granola, bread/muffins/quick loaves, nuts,  homemade popsicles in the summer

$10 - 15 per week depending on how many of the kids friends we are feeding

 

drinks each week - water, tea, 4L of milk (3 used for yogurt), 1 2L of soy milk (lasts about 10 days), 4L of apple cider in the winter, 2 cans of oj in the summer (for popsicles mostly), cream for coffee/ice cream

$10- 15ish per week

 

Total $120-130 ish per week  or $20 per person

 

This reflects what our meals cost but it doesn't show how we actually spend our money. I shop the sales and stock up and can/preserve a lot. So with the exception of the few fresh produce/dairy items we buy each week I may not have actually bought any of the items for our meal plan that week. We can easily eat out of our pantry/freezer and many times during tight weeks I have spent $20-30 for fresh fruits and veggies, a bit of dairy and maybe some things to fill in a couple of holes and we have managed a week of meals much like I have above. 

 

Hope that helps.

Karen


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#41 of 46 Old 05-26-2011, 12:10 PM
 
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We spend $120 a week, not including TP, laundry detergent, etc., for two adults and one toddler who loves to eat. I buy organic apples, but usually nothing else is organic. Due to my son's large number of food allergies, we have limited choices. With the exception of snacks and bread, I almost always make everything from scratch. We buy lots of fresh fruits and veggies, meat, "safe" rice ($3/lb bag) that I also grind into flour to use for pancakes and muffins, "safe" bread ($5 loaf), "safe" bar/cookie snacks ($3-5 for a small box), and "safe" calcium fortified OJ or other juice ($5 for the week just for my son to have two juice servings a day, but it's one of his few safe calcium sources). The food cost of living here is only ranked 95, but I'd fall over from shock if I ever saw chicken on sale under $1/lb (or anywhere close)! I stock up when I see the "awesome" $2.99/lb meat sales. We do get whole chickens for something like $1.29-$1.49/lb, but it seems like the carcass and giblets inside make up a lot of weight. A four pound whole chicken last's 2-3 meals, while 2 lbs of packaged chicken would go just as far. It would be great to spend less on food, but at the moment I'm just content to keep my son safe and healthy.


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#42 of 46 Old 05-26-2011, 01:38 PM
 
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I've done $50 a week for two adults and found it doable but not enjoyable.  My area has food costs of 106% of the national average, and the quality of the food you can buy tends to be very low.  Our farmer's markets are nice but expensive, and we have few ethnic grocery stores.

 

We bought very few organics.

 

In season fresh vegetables or frozen, whatever was on sale.

 

breakfasts:

egg on toast (homemade sourdough with homemade starter)

oatmeal

cereal on sale plus coupon

 

Snacks

homemade muffins

popcorn

hardboiled eggs

snackfood on sale plus coupon

 

lunch

leftovers

peanut butter sandwiches/carrot sticks (big bag cut into sticks), fruit on sale

homemade veggie burgers

 

We ate lots of bean dishes, pasta and rice, and whatever meat was on sale at the grocery store.  Summer was easier than winter because there was a larger selection of inexpensive fruits and vegetables.  I also tended to buy more prepackaged food that I could get super cheap on sale with coupons (33 cent boxes of brownie mix, super cheap frozen dinners or pizza), just because I found our diet so boring.  

 


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#43 of 46 Old 05-26-2011, 05:31 PM
 
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1. Do you buy any natural or organic foods?

We selectively buy natural and organic. I am always actively looking for coupons for organic foods

 

2. What do you do for fruits and vegetables?  (frozen, canned, fresh? wide variety or just the cheapest stuff?)

I always buy organic apples, but regular bananas and oranges (cheap and in their own wrapper!). I do buy a lot of frozen veggies in the winter b/c they are cheap and somewhat healthy. We do a CSA in the summer

 

3. What do you eat for breakfasts?

Either cold cereal or oatmeal w/ almond milk.

 

4. What do you eat for snacks?

I'm addicted to pita chips and Nutella. I know the palm oil in Nutella is really bad. I'm working on it. :)

 

5. If you're in the US, how does your location's food costs compare to the national average? (go to http://www.bestplaces.net, search for your location, then click the "cost of living" link above the Overview table.)

My area is somewhat below avg for COL/food costs. As with everywhere, though, food prices are rapidly increasing.

 

Oh, and I try to keep my bill (including toiletries, household stuff) under $80/week, which is $20/week/person for my family of 4.

 

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#44 of 46 Old 05-27-2011, 02:29 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IngaAnne View Post

We spend $120 a week, not including TP, laundry detergent, etc., for two adults and one toddler who loves to eat. I buy organic apples, but usually nothing else is organic. Due to my son's large number of food allergies, we have limited choices. With the exception of snacks and bread, I almost always make everything from scratch. We buy lots of fresh fruits and veggies, meat, "safe" rice ($3/lb bag) that I also grind into flour to use for pancakes and muffins, "safe" bread ($5 loaf), "safe" bar/cookie snacks ($3-5 for a small box), and "safe" calcium fortified OJ or other juice ($5 for the week just for my son to have two juice servings a day, but it's one of his few safe calcium sources). The food cost of living here is only ranked 95, but I'd fall over from shock if I ever saw chicken on sale under $1/lb (or anywhere close)! I stock up when I see the "awesome" $2.99/lb meat sales. We do get whole chickens for something like $1.29-$1.49/lb, but it seems like the carcass and giblets inside make up a lot of weight. A four pound whole chicken last's 2-3 meals, while 2 lbs of packaged chicken would go just as far. It would be great to spend less on food, but at the moment I'm just content to keep my son safe and healthy.




I wanted to mention bone broths as an additional calcium source.  Do you do this?  If not, you should, and you can cook his rice in it, and lots of other stuff!  Obviously great for soups, but I use it in so much more...

 

If you need to know how to do it correctly (to get all the calcium/good stuff out), ask, or visit the Traditional Foods Forum!


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#45 of 46 Old 05-29-2011, 04:22 PM
 
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We do.   We're a family of six--although #6 is still breastfed. :)  

 

1. Natural or Organic foods--only when on sale.  I'd love to buy more fruit/veggies that were Organic, but we simply can't afford to.

 

2.  We generally buy fresh, some frozen.  Tend to buy at warehouse stores or farmer's markets, because we eat a lot throughout the week.

 

3.  Cereal, homemade pancakes, eggs, etc.  Typical breakfast foods.  On Saturdays, I make homemade popovers that we serve with turkey sausage.

 

4.  Snacks--for the kids, I make a lot of muffins.  Oatmeal applesauce, banana, etc.  We eat fruit for snacks as well.  If I made pancakes for breakfast, then we'll put peanut butter or sometimes even Nutella (yum) on a pancake as a snack.

 

5.  Cost of living is 7.07% higher than the rest of the U.S.

 

$150/week is our total food budget period.  We don't eat out... maybe 1x/month.  Everything is pretty much made from scratch.  It's really tough.  I was trying to buy my gas with that money too, but now that it costs almost $70 to fill up my car, not realistic anymore.

 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by laurac5 View Post

1. Do you buy any natural or organic foods?

 

2. What do you do for fruits and vegetables?  (frozen, canned, fresh? wide variety or just the cheapest stuff?)

 

3. What do you eat for breakfasts?

 

4. What do you eat for snacks?

 

5. If you're in the US, how does your location's food costs compare to the national average? (go to http://www.bestplaces.net, search for your location, then click the "cost of living" link above the Overview table.)

 

 

My family of 2 adults and 1 toddler (who eats 1/4-1/2 an adult serving) is stuck at $75ish a week (although that includes non-food items) and I'm looking for some ways to shave that down a bit.  Our food cost of living is 109% the national average.

 

Update: Changed the post title to be cost per person... I definitely did not think about the fact that for a family of 4, $50/week  would be incredibly tight!

 

Thanks!



 


Mom to DS(8), DS(6), DD(4), and DS(1).  "Kids do as well as they can."

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#46 of 46 Old 05-30-2011, 08:53 AM
 
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We spend just under $400/mo not counting shipping (I buy some foods online that we can't get locally).

 

1. Do you buy any natural or organic foods? We buy a lot of whole foods. I don't buy organic much.

 

2. What do you do for fruits and vegetables?  (frozen, canned, fresh? wide variety or just the cheapest stuff?) Frozen, mostly, cuz we can stock up on sales and they don't go bad. We also make it a point to try something new once a month or more.

 

3. What do you eat for breakfasts? Oatmeal and eggs

 

4. What do you eat for snacks? We eat FiberOne bars, popcorn, cheese.

 

5. If you're in the US, how does your location's food costs compare to the national average? (go to http://www.bestplaces.net, search for your location, then click the "cost of living" link above the Overview table.) We are 24.80% Lower than the U.S. average

 


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