Food preservation and storage - Mothering Forums
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 20 Old 09-03-2013, 08:35 AM - Thread Starter
 
Oread's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 171
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Does anyone else do any canning? 

I just started recently - and I put up 36 pounds of pears yesterday! It was a bit of an up front investment to get all the canning supplies I needed, but I got all those pears for $18 which I know was a fantastic deal. I also have 25 pounds of tomatoes to process today. I haven't actually done the math yet to figure out how much I am saving, I figure it isn't the cheapest way to feed us, but I like high quality produce and jams and treats all winter. So although the nectarine jam I made probably cost me more than the $1 Smuckers at the store, it is so much healthier and tasty I think it is worthwhile! And its a heck of a lot cheaper than the $8 half pints that are made locally. 

 

We also got a chest freezer recently and I'm considering 1/4 grass fed beef. Again a big up front investment, but I think it would ultimately save money. Right now I am using the freezer to store breads that I get on sale, and homemade frozen meals like lasagna and pear crisp, yum.

 

So how do you preserve and store food? What are some of your favorites? Do you think it helps save money?

Oread is offline  
#2 of 20 Old 09-03-2013, 08:54 AM
 
SweetSilver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Westfarthing
Posts: 5,010
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 46 Post(s)

I just put up 20# of organic-cuke pickles.  Even with the purchase of new lids and rings, yes, this is going to save me money-- however our pickle consumption quadruples with good, homemade pickles, so I'm not so sure that works out :p.  The savings are not so clear on other things, like jam, unless I harvest the fruit myself.  I'm hoping to round the year off with some salsa, once I settle on a recipe.  I dislike canned "fresh" salsa, so I'll be looking for a simmered recipe, or I'm going to try my friend's frozen salsa recipe.  Organic salsa is really expensive, and I think I would do well to try my own, plus I already have the jars.

 

I've considered a share of beef to reduce per-pound cost of grass fed beef, but my family is not that keen on beef, so I'm sticking to buying hamburger by the pound and the occasional cut for stew.

 

I am, however, going to be freezing some of our eggs for baking, see how it goes, and that might be a better financial decision than selling them, which we are doing, but not so much for a big profit as to cover the expense of feeding our hens organic feed.


Give me a few minutes while I caffeinate.
SweetSilver is offline  
#3 of 20 Old 09-03-2013, 09:06 AM
 
justmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: beginning anew
Posts: 5,806
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)

Just yesterday I put up 6 pints of concord grape jelly which will MORE than last us all year.  They grow wild in my area and so since I already had pectin, jars, and sugar, it cost me nothing but time.  We are processing more grapes for juice in the next day or two when I find a spare minute.  My mom is making tomato sauce from our garden tomatoes this year for us since I've been too busy.  And we always do apple sauce in large amts in September and October.  A local orchard sells their drops for $.50 per lb so it's a little more cost effective that way.  I also do other kinds of jam and pickles and salsa as I find good deals but the cost-effectiveness is iffy on those since I'm not paying a ton under typical summer retail cost.  But it does save me on grocery bills in the winter when the cost of these things skyrockets.


treehugger.gifjog.gifgreenthumb.gifknit.gifnamaste.gif

justmama is offline  
#4 of 20 Old 09-08-2013, 07:51 PM
 
Ratchet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 461
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
Sweet silver- I am the opposite, I prefer my salsa less cooked. Ball Blue Book, however, recommend "hot salsa into hot jars" so you have to warm the salsa to a simmer, so it's basically cooked. I have tried doing it with raw, cold salsa but the jars sometimes break (using boiling water for canning). Using a pressure canner I can do cold salsa into cold jas and it all heats up together, but end result is pretty equally cooked. Anyone successful with minimally cooked (before canning) salsa?
Ratchet is online now  
#5 of 20 Old 09-08-2013, 08:44 PM
 
mamarhu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: dining at the restaurant at the end of the universe
Posts: 3,033
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)

No help from me in the salsa department - I make it fresh, about a quart, twice a week. One of my most serious addictions. I will be watching to see if anyone finds good ways of preserving it. I hadn't thought of freezing.

 

I canned 6 quarts of applesauce yesterday (1/2 the apples were from Bountiful Baskets, the others from a food bank-like program). Nearly free! And a case of corn, 48 ears, from BB today, blanched and cut from the cob, and frozen. Made 12 freezer bags, each about 2 cups. Waiting for the pears to ripen, then I think I will make pear butter, probably only 3 or 4 pints. And I have about 5 lbs of carrots, waiting to be chopped and frozen. Maybe tomorrow after work?

 

I am waiting for a great deal on cases of tomatoes. I would like to put up about a dozen pints of plain tomato sauce, and a dozen quarts of some sort of spaghetti sauce. Last year, I learned that you can just put tomatoes in the blender, then freeze the sauce-like results. I really liked it, but it needs to cook longer than regular tomato sauce when you thaw it. I will do some again, but want some canned too.

 

I also like to freeze pumpkin puree - that is one food that remains truly seasonal. Very cheap after Thanksgiving! We like pumpkin soup, and pasta sauce with pumpkin, ham, and yogurt, besides the occasional pie and pumpkin muffins. I get pie pumpkins from the farm stand - jack-o-lanterns at the grocery store are not the same thing at all. We also roast the seeds, but they never last, even when I do 10 pumpkins at a time.

 

A few months ago, I got an amazing deal on onions, $3/20 lbs IIRC, and chopped and froze many, many baggies full. I felt like they would last my lifetime, but they are gone already. They were so handy to add to almost everything, already chopped. I also chopped and froze red and green bell peppers, in 1 cup portions, to add to soups and things. Come to think of it, they are almost gone too. Will have to watch for deals like that again.


Rhu - mother,grandmother,daughter,sister,friend-foster,adoptive,and biological;not necessarily in that order. Some of it's magic, some of it's tragic, but I had a good life all the way (Jimmy Buffet)

mamarhu is online now  
#6 of 20 Old 09-09-2013, 09:15 AM
 
justmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: beginning anew
Posts: 5,806
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamarhu View Post
 

I also like to freeze pumpkin puree - that is one food that remains truly seasonal. Very cheap after Thanksgiving! We like pumpkin soup, and pasta sauce with pumpkin, ham, and yogurt, besides the occasional pie and pumpkin muffins. I get pie pumpkins from the farm stand - jack-o-lanterns at the grocery store are not the same thing at all. We also roast the seeds, but they never last, even when I do 10 pumpkins at a time.

 

YES!  Every year we do bunches of pumpkins and put them in the freeer(that key is broken) for the year in baggies.  Last year I had 22 cups of puree in one cup servings.  It lasted us until about May.  I miss the pumpkin muffins in the morning.  Can't wait until pumpkin time.  

 

I am currently waiting for my jars to heat up and my water to boil in my stockpot because I"m canning applesauce today.  Cinnamon/ginger and plain.  My parents took my kids apple picking yesterday and I gave them money for drops.  $11 got me 22lbs!  We'll have to go back this weekend but 22lbs of apples is a lot to deal with in your kitchen at one time.


treehugger.gifjog.gifgreenthumb.gifknit.gifnamaste.gif

justmama is offline  
#7 of 20 Old 09-09-2013, 10:31 AM
 
MadelinesMama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Springfield, Mo
Posts: 221
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Last year was my first attempt at canning and I made WAY too much apple butter and not enough apple sauce.  We picked organic apples for $10 a bushel at a local farm last week so I'm working on turning that all into applesauce.  My kids can't get enough of it!  When I have the energy to deal with it all I can it.  If I make a batch and don't have the time or energy I just dump it in jars and throw in the freezer.  I also sliced a bunch of apples for baking and froze last year.  I still have bunches left.  I think buying fruit/veggies at deep discounts and preserving them definitely saves money.  How else could I get a years worth of applesauce for $10? 

lmonter likes this.

Married to my other half

Mama to Madeline (07-10-07) and Finley (10-17-11)

MadelinesMama is offline  
#8 of 20 Old 09-09-2013, 04:25 PM
 
happyhats's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,190
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)

I'll be getting some apples here in the next month from a farm, 50 cents a lb if we buy a bushel.  I also might be making pear sauce and/or butter from a resource that my sister has.  As far as pumpkin puree, I have done it and I love it, but fresh pumpkins usually aren't inexpensive here so we buy pumpkin in puree all year long in cans.  I have done both jackolantern pumpkins and pie pumpkins.  Jack O Lantern pumpkins are perfectly edible and tasty, but to me they compare more to a squash.  If  you want a "sweet" pumpkin go for the smaller pie variety.

happyhats is online now  
#9 of 20 Old 09-09-2013, 09:08 PM
 
iowaorganic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Iowa
Posts: 3,292
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I can and freeze a LOT.  I have done 98 qts of green beans so far along with lots of jam.  I lactoferment anything that can be lactofermented too.  I did 2 gallons of pickles, 16 qts of onions and 4 qts of salsa that way.  I also dehydrate my onions and have done 2 gallons like that so far.  Yesterday the kids and I picked a friends apple tree and got about 6 bushels off it so today we started in on that mess- 42 qts of apple pie filling  (I add a qt to our crockpot oatmeal and it is amazing that way) and 5 quarts frozen.  Of course that has barely made a dent in what we picked- so it is looking to be a week long project.  I would like to do another 20 quarts or so of pie filling and then start on sauce and cider.  I use my bosch blender to make raw sauce and then I freeze it in zip locks.  I don't season, sweeten, or cook it.  I guess I don't skin it either lol.  Super simple if you have a good blender.  I do live on a farm- so we raise our own amazing meat- but buying a quarter will definitely save you money if you are buying any cuts at all.  I also can a lot of stew meat in the late fall when we get hogs butchered.  2#s of stew meat makes a quart and we eat a qt for a quick and easy meal- I usually try to can 75-100 qts of meat.  That however does take awhile.  

 

It seems like if you let people know you are canning- jars will almost come to you...  I might have to buy some this year- but I have been given a LOT of jars over the years and now have probably somewhere around 400 that have been practically free.  


Iowaorganic- mama to DD (1/5/06), DS1 (4/9/07), DS2 (1/22/09), DS3 (12/10/10), DD2 (7/6/12) and a new kid due in early 2014

iowaorganic is offline  
#10 of 20 Old 09-10-2013, 08:38 AM
 
mamarhu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: dining at the restaurant at the end of the universe
Posts: 3,033
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by iowaorganic View Post
 

I can and freeze a LOT.  I have done 98 qts of green beans so far along with lots of jam.  I lactoferment anything that can be lactofermented too.  I did 2 gallons of pickles, 16 qts of onions and 4 qts of salsa that way.  I also dehydrate my onions and have done 2 gallons like that so far.  Yesterday the kids and I picked a friends apple tree and got about 6 bushels off it so today we started in on that mess- 42 qts of apple pie filling  (I add a qt to our crockpot oatmeal and it is amazing that way) and 5 quarts frozen.  Of course that has barely made a dent in what we picked- so it is looking to be a week long project.  I would like to do another 20 quarts or so of pie filling and then start on sauce and cider.  I use my bosch blender to make raw sauce and then I freeze it in zip locks.  I don't season, sweeten, or cook it.  I guess I don't skin it either lol.  Super simple if you have a good blender.  I do live on a farm- so we raise our own amazing meat- but buying a quarter will definitely save you money if you are buying any cuts at all.  I also can a lot of stew meat in the late fall when we get hogs butchered.  2#s of stew meat makes a quart and we eat a qt for a quick and easy meal- I usually try to can 75-100 qts of meat.  That however does take awhile.  

 

It seems like if you let people know you are canning- jars will almost come to you...  I might have to buy some this year- but I have been given a LOT of jars over the years and now have probably somewhere around 400 that have been practically free.  

 

I am speechless at the sheer quantities you are talking about! WOW!


Rhu - mother,grandmother,daughter,sister,friend-foster,adoptive,and biological;not necessarily in that order. Some of it's magic, some of it's tragic, but I had a good life all the way (Jimmy Buffet)

mamarhu is online now  
#11 of 20 Old 09-17-2013, 01:58 AM
 
lmonter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: My own private Idaho
Posts: 6,382
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I lost count after the weekend of 119 jars (mostly peaches?) a few weeks back, haven't updated my yearly tally yet (and I'm on a 2-3 year rotation with some stuff - I haven't had to can tuna since pre-Fukushima, mine's the non-radioative stuff, yeehaw).  Today I finished tomato sauce (uh, over 21 jars?) from two boxes of tomatoes, have green beans I need to can, and am desperately hunting craigslist for another upright freezer.  My half a cow, pig, 80lbs of chicken, year's worth of jam, half a lamb, and assorted other fruits and veggies is starting to take up space.  My kids keep getting bigger, and we're fans of eating *good* food so I tend to be kinda busy this time of year.  I'm kinda burnt out right now, honestly.  I just need to get things done in the next few weeks so I can have some breathing room.


Although today I also made 7 batches of muffins (had bananas that *had* to be used, and have pounds of shredded zucchini), so we're cool on part of breakfasts for the next month.  :D  Apples haven't started yet, but it's not unheard of for me to haul home 300-400lbs of apples from wherever (my farmer's market hookup, my elderly orchard folks, whatever).  Although granted, I have a Squeezo which makes light work out of applesauce, and we also press apple cider with an apple press we were lucky enough to procure a few kids ago.  Darn moose ate most of our apples from our own trees this year, that was a first.  Planning to make Concord grape cider this year (might water it down with apple cider if we need to), yum. 

Yes to letting people know you can.  I have a neighbor that sends me hand-me-downs every so often.  I have family all over the state that sends jars home with my mom (some family heirlooms from my grandma, some from other friends cleaning out barns), I've gotten a good 800+ jars that way in the last 2-3 years alone.  It's been great.  And just when I've about run out of jars, a fresh batch of jars appears from some other place.  I reward some folks with my grandma's secret recipe relish or vanilla-honey pears or something, works out well.  :)


Wife to an amazing hubby, mother hen to four chicken3.gif 
(If you're curious, 2003, 2006, 2008, 2010, and yes, it's a busy house)
lmonter is offline  
#12 of 20 Old 09-17-2013, 10:50 AM
 
Mom2SammyJoe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Michigan
Posts: 417
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I have probably only purchased about 10% of the jars we own. Most have been passed along. Just this week I realized we are down to 2 dozen empty qts and still need to do applesauce. My MIL brought us 3 dozen jars they had in the barn from her parents and said that they have more if we need them. In return I gave her 2 dozen pints. We used to use a lot more smaller jars, but now we have more, bigger eaters and use quarts. She just cans for the 2 of them and uses more pints and was going to buy more new. It worked out great.


Mom to Sam (3/2007), Bekah (4/2009)hbac.gif, Jedidiah (4/2012)hbac.gif, and expecting #4 in March!
Mom2SammyJoe is offline  
#13 of 20 Old 09-17-2013, 11:13 AM
 
Caneel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Small town in a rural area
Posts: 3,869
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I don't can but agree to get the word out.  I am often gifted canned goods and save the jars for my aunt.  (or I will return to gifter if they want them back.)

 

We buy our beef by the half.  The cost this fall was $4.30 per pound for natural, family-farm raised (went straight from the farm to the butcher) beef.  I think the hanging weight was 330 lbs.  The per pound price included the processing.  Keep in mind approximately half of the meat will be ground beef.  This is year 5 buying this way and the 50% rule stands based on a review of my cutting sheets.  My farmer friend (the one raising the beef) gets hers cut into as many steaks as possible and she said she still averages 40% ground beef.


Mom to DS, born fall 05 after ,,, wife/best friend to DH We have
Caneel is offline  
#14 of 20 Old 09-19-2013, 04:52 AM
 
justmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: beginning anew
Posts: 5,806
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)

I'm so jealous of all of you that are getting free jars and free stuff to put IN the jars.  No one around here cans or does anything outside the realm of mainstream consumerism and purchasing their week of groceries at Wal-Mart.  I've been told many times that I'm like an 80 year old in a 32 year old's body.  


treehugger.gifjog.gifgreenthumb.gifknit.gifnamaste.gif

justmama is offline  
#15 of 20 Old 09-21-2013, 11:53 PM
 
Wolfcat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 1,104
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
I just taught myself to can a week or so ago. Lots of tomatoes and some pickled watermelon rind. I'm going to try green pepper jelly in a few weeks. I'm thinking about what else to make. Apple's aren't big in this part of the state and cukes are almost out of season. I'd like to try fermented pickles and sauerkraut.

Check out my business, Pangaia Metaphysical Store, and radio blog, Pagan Musings.
I'm a witchy mama to DS ('06) and DD ('10) with DH, Stormie, a heathen homemaker daddy.

Wolfcat is online now  
#16 of 20 Old 09-22-2013, 04:04 AM
 
EmsMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 1,390
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)

I really love to can.  I buy my fruit from a farmer that I know pretty well.  I go to the market towards the end of the day and she will sell me a huge box of peaches for $20.  Last week, that must have been 35 pounds of peaches.  Last year I canned peaches and made a lot of jam - strawberry, peach, blueberry. Spiced peach jam as well.   I use a low sugar pectin and a minimal amount of sugar and the jam is really fantastic. Oh, yes, I also made tomato jam which was fantastic.   This year I am going to can up some applesauce and apple butter and something with pears,  There is something about the whole process of canning that I find very relaxing and enjoyable.  And, of course, eating the food later on is fantastic.   After the first year when I had to buy the equipment (canner, jars, etc.), the whole process ended up being very frugal.  Once I secure cheap or free sources of fruits, each jar is quite cheap to create.  Of course the jars themselves cost about .75 cents apiece, so it is in the reuse that things really end up being sustainably frugal.  Unfortunately, I tend to give away my jam and no one ever gives the jars back : (  

EmsMom is online now  
#17 of 20 Old 09-22-2013, 04:37 PM
 
Poddi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: BC, Canada
Posts: 1,927
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)

I like to make apple butter.  I don't can them, just put them in the freezer (like freezer jam).  They keep for a whole year.  We can get fresh local apples in fall for about 60 cents per pound and I usually choose gala or jonagold.  My jars are all recycled glass jars from other stuff.  Since I don't can them, just freeze, they don't need to be tight sealing or anything.  Just make sure the lid is not on tight when you first put them in, after they're frozen you can screw them on tight. :)


Mom to 2 beautiful autistic boys (12 & 11)  
Poddi is online now  
#18 of 20 Old 09-24-2013, 06:18 PM
 
kitchensqueen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Elk Grove Village, IL
Posts: 3,265
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)

I do a fair bit of preserving. I've got a water bath canner, and last year we invested in a pressure canner as well. I've stocked up on jars, lids and other supplies over the course of a few years when I can find things cheaply. 

 

For water bath canning, I mostly focus on tomatoes - we go through a lot of tomatoes at our house. I've also done pickles and jams, but mostly in small batches. I actually haven't used the pressure canner yet since I bought it last year (for shame), but my primary interest in getting it was to be able to can stock. 

 

We also have a small chest freezer, so I also freeze things like sweet peppers, hot peppers, bananas (for bread), pumpkin butter (which can't be canned) and other random things. If I find a good deal on produce, I buy up a supply and freeze it. I buy bunches of celery when it's on sale and dice it and freeze it for use in soups and stews. I also buy large quantities of meat when I get a good deal, and freeze it in dinner portion sizes. And I buy my flour in bulk 25 pound bags, which I keep in the freezer to keep it fresh and safe from pests. 

 

I've got a lot of things on my to do list - ultimately I'd like to preserve enough tomatoes, peppers, beans, onions, and celery to last us the entire year, from our own garden. I'd also like to get into charcuterie, like sausage making and cured meats like pancetta. I have made my own cured and smoked bacon, as well as gravlax, but I don't do that on a regular basis. And I'd definitely like to learn how to use my pressure canner for the stocks and vegatables, as well as prepared meals like soups and stews. 


Apartment Farm - the chronicles of my cooking, gardening, crafting and other such things. 

 

kitchensqueen is offline  
#19 of 20 Old 09-25-2013, 03:50 AM
 
EmsMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 1,390
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)

that is a good idea about the celery.  I always end up throwing out some because I don't use it all that much.  I will freeze corn cut off the cob, sliced peaches during peach season that I use later for smoothies or baking.  If I get a good price on peppers I will cut them up and freeze them.  I also freeze hummus and pesto, but divided up into reasonable portions.  I don't have enough room for a chest freezer yet.  I will often make up a batch of whole grain waffles and then freeze them for later breakfasts (they do great in the toaster oven).  I also freeze butter when it goes on sale cheap.  I am impressed about the sausage making!

EmsMom is online now  
#20 of 20 Old 09-25-2013, 05:57 AM
 
meandk0610's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: MD
Posts: 1,095
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've gotten the supplies but have scared of my pressure cooker! I've been told that they no longer explode if you leave them alone but I'm still nervous.
meandk0610 is offline  
Reply

Tags
Frugality

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off