Special diets on a budget. - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 16 Old 03-05-2014, 11:06 AM - Thread Starter
 
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My family and I have decided to make the switch to vegetarian living.  We still have some meat in our freezer that I will cook up, but I'm not going to be buying any more.  My husband might be getting some meat here and there but the kids and I (two 6 year olds and a 1 year old) are going meat-free for at least the majority of the time.  Unfortunately, 3 of the 4 of us also need to be wheat and dairy free.  So.  How on earth can we do this in an AFFORDABLE way?  We have been eating pretty much all our meals with meat (processed and otherwise) so this will be a big change.  I don't want to start buying "alternatives" in the vegetarian section; I just want nice whole foods that are still nutritional and balanced.

 

It seems to me that most "special' diets are pretty expensive.  I'm sure I can come up with a bunch of cheap-ish recipes, but I'm looking for more... been there, done that sort of experiences that it's actually feasible to do it cheaply.

 

(As an added bonus I would love to eat locally as well.  We do for the most part.  We live in the northern regions with looooong winters and a short growing season, and we don't have much of a garden.  So although we have some great farmer's markets, I'm really limited on what I can grow.  Herbs and some container vegetables is it.)

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#2 of 16 Old 03-05-2014, 04:21 PM
 
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You need a handful of great recipes to start with and expand on that:

 

Honey Baked Lentils: http://happyfoody.blogspot.com/2006/10/honey-baked-lentils.html

 

Black bean and butternut squash burritos: http://ohsheglows.com/2011/10/24/black-bean-and-butternut-squash-burritos/

 

brown rice patties: http://beautythatmoves.typepad.com/beauty_that_moves/2008/12/really-bad-photos-totally-awesome-recipe.html

 

Snobby Joes: http://www.theppk.com/2009/11/snobby-joes/

 

Apple Cinnamon Steel cut oats: http://www.theyummylife.com/Slow_Cooker_Apple_Cinnamon_Oatmeal

 

Banana oatmeal muffins(obviously substitute your favorite dairy-free milk and yogurt): http://half-bakedbaker.blogspot.com/2009/01/guilt-and-gulten-free-oatmeal-banana.html

 

 

I would focus my meals on vegetables and a grain that's healthty for you like rice or quinoa or couscous.  Things like stir fries would work easily for everyone.  Cheese isn't hard to omit but you are already there.  To make this affordable you will need to lean on grains to fill out your meals because living on fruits and vegetables is EXPENSIVE.  Beans are very cheap in bulk.  If you choose to include eggs in your diet, they are a great and quick protein that fits the budget AND your dietary limitations.  Shop the sale flyer each week and plan your meals around what's on sale.  Things that stay pretty affordable are potatoes, onions, squashes, bananas, apples, kale, etc.  Obviously those aren't all local to you.  But when you find a good deal, stock up.  Cut up and free*e any extras for weeks when it's not on sale.  Also, your crockpot is a great way to cook large batches of beans overnight instead of having to simmer them for hours on the stovetop.  Soups are great ways to stretch your odds and ends when supplies get low.  

 

But I think you need to understand that your grocery budget won't be as low as it could possibly be with all those limitations.  YOu are choosing to adopt a more expensive way of eating.  If it makes you healthier, great.  But you can't have dirt cheap eating AND health with the limitations you already have.

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#3 of 16 Old 03-05-2014, 04:42 PM
 
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check out my whole food life. Its a blog with that is vegan with alot of wheat free recupes too. I love it!
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#4 of 16 Old 03-05-2014, 05:29 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Those are great to start off, thank you!  I'm saving those recipes and checking out that site too.  =D

 

Also... I'm not looking for dirt cheap - I'm more looking for "as frugal as possible".  We already spend quite a bit on groceries.  A large part of that budget is meat, which is pretty spendy.

 

What I'm more worried about is taking out dairy and wheat.  We've done that before so I know it's possible, but those just makes up a large portion of our diet right now.  (Breads, pasta, dairy products such as yogurt, kefir, cheese, butter...)  But my son and husband have pretty bad excema, and both my older kids are on the spectrum and GFCF foods help their symptoms.  And then I have thyroid issues which are really helped by eliminating wheat - I did it during my pregnancy and felt a million times better.  So, I mean.  A part of me is definitely saying that it's nice to have the luxury to be able to follow these diets but I do see them as at least moderately "necessary" for our health.  Maybe not the vegetarian part, but still...  I just don't want to go broke doing it.  :)

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#5 of 16 Old 03-05-2014, 05:38 PM
 
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I am gluten intolerant. I find that homemade...although time comsuming is yummier and cheaper. I do dairy but moat recipea will sub almond milk in ok. That site I listed is pretty frugal too.
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#6 of 16 Old 03-07-2014, 07:18 AM
 
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I'm wheat free, my daughter is dairy free and husband is vegetarian... you can definitely do special diets on a budget. 

 

Grains - Identify what grains you would like to eat. Brown rice, white rice, quinoa are all gluten free. You can get good GF pasta these days, same for rice noodles.

1. Brown basmati rice can be cooked on stove top or oven (Alton brown method)..but I find it easier on stove top.. Twice the amount of water + brown rice + 1/2 to 1 tbsp coconut oil + salt - bring to boil. reduce heat to minimum and cook for 50 mins - 1 hr. Do not open and stir in between. For checking if done, insert a wooden spoon in the middle and part the rice till the very end. if there's no water, the rice is done, switch off the heat, cover and leave it aside for 10 more mins, Fluff using a fork. 

2. White rice can be cooked same way. I use white basmati rice from Indian store. same method as above, but only 15 mins after bring to a boil. Using brown rice or white rice, you can add interest in many ways. You can make fried rice with cold rice from fridge. Or eat it with vegetarian chili or dal (lentils) or garbanzo beans.. There are a million recipes you can make with different lentils and beans to go with rice. 

3. Quinoa: Toast quinoa in a dry saucepan, add 1 and 3/4 cup water and add salt. bring to boil. Cover and let it cook for 15-20 mins on low flame.. you can use this basic quinoa for salads, but also make flavored quinoa with different spices and make it like a pilaf. Quinoa stores well in the refriegerator. 

4. Rice noodles can be used for Thai dishes or Vietnamese dishes - very yummy! Google for pad thai (yumm!) or vietnamese pho recipes which are broth, noodles and veggies with simple spices. 

5. GF pasta which is typically made of rice, can be used for many saute pasta dishes.. you can look for daiya cheese - which can be used for vegan macaroni or other cheesy dishes, once in a while 

6. Pizza: you can easily make GF pizza crust and use pizza sauce + daiya cheese for a once in a while option for kids

7. Elanas pantry, spunky coconut are all wheat free blogs - they eat some meat, but also have recipes for nut/coconut based snacks, breads etc.. very filling and great healthy recipes.

8. chia pudding - in many flavors

 

Protein: - Beans/Lentils:

1. Most lentils and peas can be cooked without presoaking, but if it has skin, it helps to soak it for faster cooking and easier digestion and absorption. Saute some onion, minced garlic and other vegetables you like and add the soaked and washed lentils and add thrice the water and let it all cook together to form a nice stew.. add salt and spice according to your liking. 

2. You can also stir fry sprouted lentils with onion and garlic and some basic spices... Very tasty

3. Any beans soaked and cooked - can be used in salads, curries, soups, stirfries, fried rices, stews, chillies, etc.. If making chili, then some quinoa can be thrown in while cooking, to give it the same texture as nonvegetarian chili. It makes a great one pot dish. I like to make chili out of black beans, tomatoes, onions, garlic, green pepeprs.. sometimes i add in some grated carrots too.. 

4. You can make almond milk at home easily if you dont have nut allergies - this can be plain or flavored. There are many recipes on google.

 

Vegetables:

1. Salads

2. Stirfries

3. Soups

4. Like noodles - spiralized zucchini noodles, or sliced using peeler noodles etc - eat raw or sauted lightly with spices

 

deserts:

1. sorbets

2. popsicles

3. coconut milk based icecreams

4. homebaked cookies / look for elana's paleo breakfast bread

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#7 of 16 Old 03-08-2014, 04:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shakti77 View Post
 

I'm wheat free, my daughter is dairy free and husband is vegetarian... you can definitely do special diets on a budget. 

 

Grains - Identify what grains you would like to eat. Brown rice, white rice, quinoa are all gluten free. You can get good GF pasta these days, same for rice noodles.

1. Brown basmati rice can be cooked on stove top or oven (Alton brown method)..but I find it easier on stove top.. Twice the amount of water + brown rice + 1/2 to 1 tbsp coconut oil + salt - bring to boil. reduce heat to minimum and cook for 50 mins - 1 hr. Do not open and stir in between. For checking if done, insert a wooden spoon in the middle and part the rice till the very end. if there's no water, the rice is done, switch off the heat, cover and leave it aside for 10 more mins, Fluff using a fork. 

2. White rice can be cooked same way. I use white basmati rice from Indian store. same method as above, but only 15 mins after bring to a boil. Using brown rice or white rice, you can add interest in many ways. You can make fried rice with cold rice from fridge. Or eat it with vegetarian chili or dal (lentils) or garbanzo beans.. There are a million recipes you can make with different lentils and beans to go with rice. 

3. Quinoa: Toast quinoa in a dry saucepan, add 1 and 3/4 cup water and add salt. bring to boil. Cover and let it cook for 15-20 mins on low flame.. you can use this basic quinoa for salads, but also make flavored quinoa with different spices and make it like a pilaf. Quinoa stores well in the refriegerator. 

4. Rice noodles can be used for Thai dishes or Vietnamese dishes - very yummy! Google for pad thai (yumm!) or vietnamese pho recipes which are broth, noodles and veggies with simple spices. 

5. GF pasta which is typically made of rice, can be used for many saute pasta dishes.. you can look for daiya cheese - which can be used for vegan macaroni or other cheesy dishes, once in a while 

6. Pizza: you can easily make GF pizza crust and use pizza sauce + daiya cheese for a once in a while option for kids

7. Elanas pantry, spunky coconut are all wheat free blogs - they eat some meat, but also have recipes for nut/coconut based snacks, breads etc.. very filling and great healthy recipes.

8. chia pudding - in many flavors

 

Protein: - Beans/Lentils:

1. Most lentils and peas can be cooked without presoaking, but if it has skin, it helps to soak it for faster cooking and easier digestion and absorption. Saute some onion, minced garlic and other vegetables you like and add the soaked and washed lentils and add thrice the water and let it all cook together to form a nice stew.. add salt and spice according to your liking. 

2. You can also stir fry sprouted lentils with onion and garlic and some basic spices... Very tasty

3. Any beans soaked and cooked - can be used in salads, curries, soups, stirfries, fried rices, stews, chillies, etc.. If making chili, then some quinoa can be thrown in while cooking, to give it the same texture as nonvegetarian chili. It makes a great one pot dish. I like to make chili out of black beans, tomatoes, onions, garlic, green pepeprs.. sometimes i add in some grated carrots too.. 

4. You can make almond milk at home easily if you dont have nut allergies - this can be plain or flavored. There are many recipes on google.

 

Vegetables:

1. Salads

2. Stirfries

3. Soups

4. Like noodles - spiralized zucchini noodles, or sliced using peeler noodles etc - eat raw or sauted lightly with spices

 

deserts:

1. sorbets

2. popsicles

3. coconut milk based icecreams

4. homebaked cookies / look for elana's paleo breakfast bread

Beautiful post.  Thanks for taking the time.  I think you even have things to teach me and I've been vegetarian for 14 years.


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#8 of 16 Old 03-12-2014, 12:49 AM
 
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Yes, that was a great post!

 

I think it helps to focus on what you do eat, rather than what you don't. For example, bread is typically made of wheat. Gluten-free alternatives are expensive (and often disappointing!). Rather than trying to do "bread" alternatives, consider non-bread foods - corn tortillas come to mind. Or a casserole with rice or potatoes instead of noodles. Same with dairy. Instead of expensive non-dairy milk substitutes (almond, soy or whatever), aim for recipes that don't call for dairy products in the first place. Drink tea, juice, water. Produce can be bought in bulk, cheaply in season, directly from the farm if possible, and preserved by freezing, canning, or dehydrating.

 

If you can come up with 10 or 15 supper recipes that your family likes, you can rotate them and never get too bored. My family loves brown rice topped with a spinach and mushroom gravy. My local produce market, not the more upscale, trendy Farmer's Market, caters to the Eastern European immigrants, and has great prices on potatoes, cabbage, and mushrooms year around. Potatoes with marinara sauce. Baked potatoes with broccoli and onions. Green chili with white beans. Adding seasonal veggies as they are available keeps it interesting. Stir-fried, or broiled with olive oil and herbs, or shish-kabob style on the grill.

 

If I find something interesting on sale at the produce market, I often buy a huge quantity, then bring it home and then figure out what to do with it. After last Thanksgiving, I found pumpkins on sale for 9 cents a pound. I bought around 40 lbs, and learned online how to bake, puree and freeze them. We have used them for pumpkin muffins and pumpkin/lentil curry and an African recipe for pumpkin stew. Not to mention quite a few pies. Still have some left, but next year I will aim for 60 pounds or so! One year I got a deal on 2 huge burlap bags of corn that we blanched, cut from the ears, and froze. I learned that you can freeze whole lemons just as they are, for later use in recipes or lemonade. Tomatoes can be pureed in a blender, and frozen raw, for use in sauces and soups. My favorite produce market always has $5 or less bags (25lbs?) of blemished fruit or veggies, that can be salvaged. I have gotten oranges for juice, and onions and bell peppers to chop and freeze in one cup portions for recipes.

 

I look for cases of tomatoes, apples, and peaches each summer, to can in various forms (sauce, butter, etc.). I have experimented with canning green beans and pickling other veggies, but generally prefer to blanch and freeze them, along with corn. I also grow my own herbs (indoors in winter) because I think fresh herbs are essential, and way too expensive at the supermarket - $2 for a small bunch. I have sage, rosemary, thyme, cilantro, dill, basil, and oregano on my windowsill right now. Sometimes I add parsley and others to that list. Fresh herbs make me feel wealthy. Lettuce and other greens are also easy to grow in pots if you have even a small yard or balcony. On the subject of a yard, have you considered raising chickens? 6 hens would give you a bunch of eggs, they are surprisingly low-maintenance, and endlessly amusing.

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#9 of 16 Old 05-06-2014, 07:43 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shakti77 View Post
 

I'm wheat free, my daughter is dairy free and husband is vegetarian... you can definitely do special diets on a budget. 

 

Grains - Identify what grains you would like to eat. Brown rice, white rice, quinoa are all gluten free. You can get good GF pasta these days, same for rice noodles.

1. Brown basmati rice can be cooked on stove top or oven (Alton brown method)..but I find it easier on stove top.. Twice the amount of water + brown rice + 1/2 to 1 tbsp coconut oil + salt - bring to boil. reduce heat to minimum and cook for 50 mins - 1 hr. Do not open and stir in between. For checking if done, insert a wooden spoon in the middle and part the rice till the very end. if there's no water, the rice is done, switch off the heat, cover and leave it aside for 10 more mins, Fluff using a fork. 

2. White rice can be cooked same way. I use white basmati rice from Indian store. same method as above, but only 15 mins after bring to a boil. Using brown rice or white rice, you can add interest in many ways. You can make fried rice with cold rice from fridge. Or eat it with vegetarian chili or dal (lentils) or garbanzo beans.. There are a million recipes you can make with different lentils and beans to go with rice. 

3. Quinoa: Toast quinoa in a dry saucepan, add 1 and 3/4 cup water and add salt. bring to boil. Cover and let it cook for 15-20 mins on low flame.. you can use this basic quinoa for salads, but also make flavored quinoa with different spices and make it like a pilaf. Quinoa stores well in the refriegerator. 

4. Rice noodles can be used for Thai dishes or Vietnamese dishes - very yummy! Google for pad thai (yumm!) or vietnamese pho recipes which are broth, noodles and veggies with simple spices. 

5. GF pasta which is typically made of rice, can be used for many saute pasta dishes.. you can look for daiya cheese - which can be used for vegan macaroni or other cheesy dishes, once in a while 

6. Pizza: you can easily make GF pizza crust and use pizza sauce + daiya cheese for a once in a while option for kids

7. Elanas pantry, spunky coconut are all wheat free blogs - they eat some meat, but also have recipes for nut/coconut based snacks, breads etc.. very filling and great healthy recipes.

8. chia pudding - in many flavors

 

Protein: - Beans/Lentils:

1. Most lentils and peas can be cooked without presoaking, but if it has skin, it helps to soak it for faster cooking and easier digestion and absorption. Saute some onion, minced garlic and other vegetables you like and add the soaked and washed lentils and add thrice the water and let it all cook together to form a nice stew.. add salt and spice according to your liking. 

2. You can also stir fry sprouted lentils with onion and garlic and some basic spices... Very tasty

3. Any beans soaked and cooked - can be used in salads, curries, soups, stirfries, fried rices, stews, chillies, etc.. If making chili, then some quinoa can be thrown in while cooking, to give it the same texture as nonvegetarian chili. It makes a great one pot dish. I like to make chili out of black beans, tomatoes, onions, garlic, green pepeprs.. sometimes i add in some grated carrots too.. 

4. You can make almond milk at home easily if you dont have nut allergies - this can be plain or flavored. There are many recipes on google.

 

Vegetables:

1. Salads

2. Stirfries

3. Soups

4. Like noodles - spiralized zucchini noodles, or sliced using peeler noodles etc - eat raw or sauted lightly with spices

 

deserts:

1. sorbets

2. popsicles

3. coconut milk based icecreams

4. homebaked cookies / look for elana's paleo breakfast bread

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mamarhu View Post
 

Yes, that was a great post!

 

I think it helps to focus on what you do eat, rather than what you don't. For example, bread is typically made of wheat. Gluten-free alternatives are expensive (and often disappointing!). Rather than trying to do "bread" alternatives, consider non-bread foods - corn tortillas come to mind. Or a casserole with rice or potatoes instead of noodles. Same with dairy. Instead of expensive non-dairy milk substitutes (almond, soy or whatever), aim for recipes that don't call for dairy products in the first place. Drink tea, juice, water. Produce can be bought in bulk, cheaply in season, directly from the farm if possible, and preserved by freezing, canning, or dehydrating.

 

If you can come up with 10 or 15 supper recipes that your family likes, you can rotate them and never get too bored. My family loves brown rice topped with a spinach and mushroom gravy. My local produce market, not the more upscale, trendy Farmer's Market, caters to the Eastern European immigrants, and has great prices on potatoes, cabbage, and mushrooms year around. Potatoes with marinara sauce. Baked potatoes with broccoli and onions. Green chili with white beans. Adding seasonal veggies as they are available keeps it interesting. Stir-fried, or broiled with olive oil and herbs, or shish-kabob style on the grill.

 

If I find something interesting on sale at the produce market, I often buy a huge quantity, then bring it home and then figure out what to do with it. After last Thanksgiving, I found pumpkins on sale for 9 cents a pound. I bought around 40 lbs, and learned online how to bake, puree and freeze them. We have used them for pumpkin muffins and pumpkin/lentil curry and an African recipe for pumpkin stew. Not to mention quite a few pies. Still have some left, but next year I will aim for 60 pounds or so! One year I got a deal on 2 huge burlap bags of corn that we blanched, cut from the ears, and froze. I learned that you can freeze whole lemons just as they are, for later use in recipes or lemonade. Tomatoes can be pureed in a blender, and frozen raw, for use in sauces and soups. My favorite produce market always has $5 or less bags (25lbs?) of blemished fruit or veggies, that can be salvaged. I have gotten oranges for juice, and onions and bell peppers to chop and freeze in one cup portions for recipes.

 

I look for cases of tomatoes, apples, and peaches each summer, to can in various forms (sauce, butter, etc.). I have experimented with canning green beans and pickling other veggies, but generally prefer to blanch and freeze them, along with corn. I also grow my own herbs (indoors in winter) because I think fresh herbs are essential, and way too expensive at the supermarket - $2 for a small bunch. I have sage, rosemary, thyme, cilantro, dill, basil, and oregano on my windowsill right now. Sometimes I add parsley and others to that list. Fresh herbs make me feel wealthy. Lettuce and other greens are also easy to grow in pots if you have even a small yard or balcony. On the subject of a yard, have you considered raising chickens? 6 hens would give you a bunch of eggs, they are surprisingly low-maintenance, and endlessly amusing.

 

These both have a lot of great tips! I've been looking into whether it would save us money to add in a few meatless days each week. We also don't do wheat, but I'm thinking that I might be able to use sorghum flour to make muffins or bread for us to use.

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#10 of 16 Old 05-13-2014, 10:27 AM
 
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Any time an additional constraint becomes present, it puts some stress on existing constraints. You have probably heard the idiom about cheap, fast, and good. You can usually have two of these, but rarely (or never) three. All convenience foods, and especially vegetarian ones (because the company knows it is offering a specialty item) are expensive. Still, vegetarian raw ingredients are rarely expensive, and can be good in simple preparations.

Check out Robin Robertson's Vegan on the Cheap. It contains some delicious recipes.
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#11 of 16 Old 05-14-2014, 10:06 AM
 
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I'm not a vegetarian, but I do try to have as many GF and simple meals as possible. I must stress - stay simple. The more complex you make the meals, the more it will cost. 

 

First, find out which vegetable staples you can easily and cheaply access from farmer's markets. Then base your meals on these staples. For us it's potatoes, onions, sweet potatoes, tomatoes and bunches of greens. Also frozen vegetables are fantastic - Buy a bag of frozen cut green beans and make a green bean, onion and tomato casserole served with brown rice. Watch out for coupons or sales with frozen items and you'll be able to stock up for very little.

 

 

A relatively inexpensive yet nourishing diet would look like this to me...

 

Breakfast: 

2 boiled eggs OR 2 egg omelette + piece of fruit + glass of unsweetened juice

 

Snacks:

Air popped popcorn (buy a popper for $15 and you're set as popping corn is pretty cheap). Put a pat of butter on top for extra goodness and much needed fat;

OR a seasoned oven baked potato with a pat of butter

OR homemade peanut butter with cut up fruit

OR homemade hummus with carrot sticks

 

Lunch: 

Leftovers from night before (dinner) - saves the hassle of making a fresh hot lunch every day too.

 

Dinner:

Various veggie/bean soups or casseroles. Serve next to brown or partially milled rice or a green salad. Be sure to double up on servings so there is enough for lunch the next day.

 

Have you tried any gut healing diets for your twins that are on the spectrum? You said GF helps them, but properly restoring their gut bacteria and ensuring effective digestion might help even more.. just a thought. :)


 

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#12 of 16 Old 05-25-2014, 01:34 PM
 
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Originally Posted by mamarhu View Post
 

Yes, that was a great post!

 

I think it helps to focus on what you do eat, rather than what you don't. For example, bread is typically made of wheat. Gluten-free alternatives are expensive (and often disappointing!). Rather than trying to do "bread" alternatives, consider non-bread foods - corn tortillas come to mind. Or a casserole with rice or potatoes instead of noodles. Same with dairy. Instead of expensive non-dairy milk substitutes (almond, soy or whatever), aim for recipes that don't call for dairy products in the first place. Drink tea, juice, water. Produce can be bought in bulk, cheaply in season, directly from the farm if possible, and preserved by freezing, canning, or dehydrating.

 

If you can come up with 10 or 15 supper recipes that your family likes, you can rotate them and never get too bored. My family loves brown rice topped with a spinach and mushroom gravy. My local produce market, not the more upscale, trendy Farmer's Market, caters to the Eastern European immigrants, and has great prices on potatoes, cabbage, and mushrooms year around. Potatoes with marinara sauce. Baked potatoes with broccoli and onions. Green chili with white beans. Adding seasonal veggies as they are available keeps it interesting. Stir-fried, or broiled with olive oil and herbs, or shish-kabob style on the grill.

 

If I find something interesting on sale at the produce market, I often buy a huge quantity, then bring it home and then figure out what to do with it. After last Thanksgiving, I found pumpkins on sale for 9 cents a pound. I bought around 40 lbs, and learned online how to bake, puree and freeze them. We have used them for pumpkin muffins and pumpkin/lentil curry and an African recipe for pumpkin stew. Not to mention quite a few pies. Still have some left, but next year I will aim for 60 pounds or so! One year I got a deal on 2 huge burlap bags of corn that we blanched, cut from the ears, and froze. I learned that you can freeze whole lemons just as they are, for later use in recipes or lemonade. Tomatoes can be pureed in a blender, and frozen raw, for use in sauces and soups. My favorite produce market always has $5 or less bags (25lbs?) of blemished fruit or veggies, that can be salvaged. I have gotten oranges for juice, and onions and bell peppers to chop and freeze in one cup portions for recipes.

 

I look for cases of tomatoes, apples, and peaches each summer, to can in various forms (sauce, butter, etc.). I have experimented with canning green beans and pickling other veggies, but generally prefer to blanch and freeze them, along with corn. I also grow my own herbs (indoors in winter) because I think fresh herbs are essential, and way too expensive at the supermarket - $2 for a small bunch. I have sage, rosemary, thyme, cilantro, dill, basil, and oregano on my windowsill right now. Sometimes I add parsley and others to that list. Fresh herbs make me feel wealthy. Lettuce and other greens are also easy to grow in pots if you have even a small yard or balcony. On the subject of a yard, have you considered raising chickens? 6 hens would give you a bunch of eggs, they are surprisingly low-maintenance, and endlessly amusing.


I would love to know , how do you freeze whole lemons ? Do you plop them in a freezer bag as is and then put them in your freezer ? And how do you thaw them out ?


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#13 of 16 Old 05-26-2014, 07:42 AM
 
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Yup - I just have a zip-lock bag in the freezer. I thaw them in the fridge when I think of it in time, otherwise on the counter.

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#14 of 16 Old 05-26-2014, 08:29 AM
 
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I do the same. They thaw nicely on the counter in a bowl.

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#15 of 16 Old 05-26-2014, 11:30 AM
 
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Oh wow , thanks guys , I´ll be sure to try that , we get free lemons all the time


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#16 of 16 Old 05-28-2014, 11:40 AM
 
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I am not vegetarian- but I have a son who is gluten and sugar free- basically low glycemic.  I have started cooking for him using Trim Healthy Mama recipes.  They are great recipes and I think many of them would work great for you as long as you are including eggs in your diet.  They have some fun bread recipes that use mostly eggs.  My son and I both like them a lot.  Look them up on pinterst or they have a book.  Good luck!


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