Food consumed in 1952 - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 08:49 AM - Thread Starter
 
velochic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Dreaming of the Bavarian Alps
Posts: 8,198
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I saw this on another forum and I thought people here would think it is interesting. Click on the picture to see the entire thing, as the pic in the article is just a tiny portion of it.

http://nc.startribune.com/blogs/oldnews/?p=204

It's interesting to see that there is next to NO processed foods. Also interesting that their food costs were 25% of their annual income... much more than most of us spend. Not sure how to interpret that.
velochic is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#2 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 09:15 AM
 
kijip's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 1,544
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
It says that they earned what would be about $30,000 in today's dollars. 25% of income would be $625 a month...I wager that is higher than the food budgets of the average family earning that much today. I think we tend to forget how many costs have been hidden from the consumer price for a long time now. In 1952, much more of the food was local and very little imported.

And one last thing...man, that is a lot of potatoes.

Katie, mama to one big boy (6/03) and one little boy (12/08).
It is never the wrong time to do the right thing.
kijip is offline  
#3 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 10:39 AM
 
Rev1053's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Western Wisconsin
Posts: 692
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
25%!

Sigh.

If only I could budget that much for food! :

Mom to '97, '07, '09 and birth mom '00 and wife to my BFF
Rev1053 is offline  
#4 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 10:52 AM
 
seap3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 792
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by kijip View Post
It says that they earned what would be about $30,000 in today's dollars. 25% of income would be $625 a month...I wager that is higher than the food budgets of the average family earning that much today. I think we tend to forget how many costs have been hidden from the consumer price for a long time now. In 1952, much more of the food was local and very little imported.

And one last thing...man, that is a lot of potatoes.
That's exactly how much we spend a month, and that's about what dh earns. I didn't know we were like a 50's household.
seap3 is offline  
#5 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 10:55 AM
 
sanguine_speed's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 3,591
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Oh, we pay. We pay subsidies through our taxation systems. We pay for treatment of water systems damaged by our "cheap" farming practices. We pay health costs for our "cheap food". And on...
We pay at least as much of a percentage as they did.

4 kids under 10
sanguine_speed is offline  
#6 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 11:15 AM
 
kijip's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 1,544
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by sanguine_speed View Post
Oh, we pay. We pay subsidies through our taxation systems. We pay for treatment of water systems damaged by our "cheap" farming practices. We pay health costs for our "cheap food". And on...
We pay at least as much of a percentage as they did.
I agree. We are spoiled that the full cost does not come out of our own pay. People are more resistant to changing it since their own out of pocket costs are relatively low.

Katie, mama to one big boy (6/03) and one little boy (12/08).
It is never the wrong time to do the right thing.
kijip is offline  
#7 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 11:48 AM
 
karina5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 3,408
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
What was Evaporated Milk used for? Did they drink that?
karina5 is offline  
#8 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 11:51 AM
 
fek&fuzz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: down in the hunker
Posts: 8,679
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by sanguine_speed View Post
Oh, we pay. We pay subsidies through our taxation systems. We pay for treatment of water systems damaged by our "cheap" farming practices. We pay health costs for our "cheap food". And on...
We pay at least as much of a percentage as they did.
Exactly, we pay the same amount and have much lower quality food. The Omnivores Dilemma touches on this, how many years ago people spent more money on food and now everyone wants things so cheap.

I recently found a local grass fed beef supplier (Sebago Lake Ranch in Maine) and bought about $100 worth of meat ranging from $15 to $5 /lb. The London Broil was $7.00/lb. Then I heard a girl at work talking about how excited she was that found London Broil on sale, 3 steaks for $7.00. I thought, "there's no way my supplier could compete with that price, but there's also no way that meat can taste good."

I used to feel bad about how much money I spent on food, but I'm seeing now that it is really about the quality of the food.
fek&fuzz is offline  
#9 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 11:57 AM
 
kijip's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 1,544
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by karina5 View Post
What was Evaporated Milk used for? Did they drink that?
Baking and candy making by and large. My grandmother was in the middle of raising a family of 9 children (oldest born in 1943) and I remember talking to her about how much more baking she did before about 1960, when she said pies and cakes and the like became more available store bought. Nearly everyone of her recipes called for evaporated milk...I think with tiny iceboxes back then, canned milk made more sense for baking. I also have some old cookbooks (50+ years) and a lot of it, in addition to having enough fat and sugar to give you a heart attack and diabetes at the same time, seems to call for canned milk. Bear in mind too that the norm for many middle class families then was dessert after every meal. My son was born too late for the dessert train . When I tell my dad to knock off the sweets for my son, he always points out that most nights he had cake, pie or something sweet after dinner...but on average, from scratch dessert making is something we now only do around the holidays. That is why you'll see huge end cap displays of the stuff from Nov to Dec and then have to dig around on the bottom shelf to find it in June.

Katie, mama to one big boy (6/03) and one little boy (12/08).
It is never the wrong time to do the right thing.
kijip is offline  
#10 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 01:13 PM
 
blueridgewoman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 1,805
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I find the routine-ness of it interesting- there are huge quantities of a few things. If you put my diet up there, there would be tiny quantities of a ton of foods. Goes to show how much our diets vary now.

mom to one glorious sweetpea born 10/18/2007.

blueridgewoman is offline  
#11 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 02:57 PM
 
polyhymnia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Greater Seattle area
Posts: 2,551
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
That is fascinating!!

My DP is not that old and he was given formula made with evaporated milk (he was a preemie and his mum's milk "never came in" because he was in the NICU for weeks. Maybe that is something it was used for in the 50's too?

jog.gif:bikenew.gif// knit.gif:reading.gif:notes2.gif // cat.gif:cat.gif 

Our precious baby girl is coming to turn our world upside down in January 2014!

polyhymnia is offline  
#12 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 03:01 PM
 
Momtwice's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 10,142
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by crayolaab View Post
That is fascinating!!

My DP is not that old and he was given formula made with evaporated milk (he was a preemie and his mum's milk "never came in" because he was in the NICU for weeks. Maybe that is something it was used for in the 50's too?
Yes, as late as the 60's (and I don't know about beyond) canned milk and corn syrup were very commonly mixed at home for babies, and popular parenting books like Dr. Spock contained the recipes. Store bought formula is a more recent invention.

Take the time to heal from your marriage before you move on with someone else. Make a list of all the qualities you would like in a new partner and then work on growing that way yourself. ~mandib50
Momtwice is offline  
#13 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 03:24 PM
 
normajean's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Slice of Heaven
Posts: 1,599
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My mom was born in 1957 and my grandma couldn't nurse. When I was having difficulty nursing my first child, she sent me her recipe for homemade formula. It contained:

evaporated cows milk
honey
raw eggs
salt

And a few other things. Funny that now my mom has lots of allergies...
normajean is offline  
#14 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 03:29 PM
 
VeggieJoy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 118
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
According to that list, each person in their family consumed an average of 9 ounces meat and 3 tablespoons butter/shortening/margarine PER DAY. That's revolting.

Good amount of vegetables and fruits, though.
VeggieJoy is offline  
#15 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 03:33 PM
 
fek&fuzz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: down in the hunker
Posts: 8,679
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by VeggieJoy View Post
According to that list, each person in their family consumed an average of 9 ounces meat and 3 tablespoons butter/shortening/margarine PER DAY. That's revolting.

Good amount of vegetables and fruits, though.
That sounds delicious! Except for the margarine, 3 tablespoons of butter would be yummy, and probably not that far off from what most people eat (figure butter on you toast in the a.m. (1Tbls), some butter on your veggies or pasta and rolls at dinner (1tbls) and then another Tbls. at lunch.

And I could eat 9 oz of meat in a day. Figure 3 oz. in a sandwhich at lunch, and 4 at dinner (that's the size of a deck of cards, which is not very big at all.)
fek&fuzz is offline  
#16 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 03:42 PM
 
polyhymnia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Greater Seattle area
Posts: 2,551
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by fek&fuzz View Post
That sounds delicious! Except for the margarine, 3 tablespoons of butter would be yummy, and probably not that far off from what most people eat (figure butter on you toast in the a.m. (1Tbls), some butter on your veggies or pasta and rolls at dinner (1tbls) and then another Tbls. at lunch.

And I could eat 9 oz of meat in a day. Figure 3 oz. in a sandwhich at lunch, and 4 at dinner (that's the size of a deck of cards, which is not very big at all.)
Yes I think it seems very reasonable, and I suspect people consume rather a lot more these days!!

jog.gif:bikenew.gif// knit.gif:reading.gif:notes2.gif // cat.gif:cat.gif 

Our precious baby girl is coming to turn our world upside down in January 2014!

polyhymnia is offline  
#17 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 04:22 PM
 
lmonter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: My own private Idaho
Posts: 6,359
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Neat. I need to show that to hubby. That's why I need a root cellar.

Yeah, my grandma didn't have a fridge until the 60's or 70's. Before then, dad says they had to keep milk and whatever else that needed to stay cool down in the creek running through their property.

Wife to an amazing hubby, mother hen to four chicken3.gif 
(If you're curious, 2003, 2006, 2008, 2010, and yes, it's a busy house)
lmonter is offline  
#18 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 04:33 PM
 
starling&diesel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: West Coast, Canada
Posts: 3,813
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
Evaporated milk in coffee ... mmm, good.
Evaporated milk in your desserts.
Evaporated milk in your soups.

dust.gifFour-eyed tattooed fairy godmother queer, mama to my lucky star (5) and little bird (2.5). Resident storyteller at www.thestoryforest.com. Enchanting audiostories for curious kids. Come play in the forest!
starling&diesel is offline  
#19 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 05:16 PM
 
Knittin' in the Shade's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: near Philly, PA
Posts: 4,541
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by VeggieJoy View Post
According to that list, each person in their family consumed an average of 9 ounces meat and 3 tablespoons butter/shortening/margarine PER DAY. That's revolting.

Good amount of vegetables and fruits, though.
What's revolting? It sounds pretty reasonable to me, actually, and probably far less meat than the average american consumes today. And the 3 tbsp of butter/shortening, I bet if you calculate how much trans fat Americans eat every day it would be close to that now, ICK!
Knittin' in the Shade is offline  
#20 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 05:34 PM
 
Ygle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 603
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We spend about 20% on food... our biggest expense!

I think it was in the Future of Food documentary they talked about how US foods are so heavily subsidized (which we all pay for!) that in Mexico, even though they grow tons of their own corn in many varieties it's actually cheaper for families to eat US imported corn (which then creates a problem with gm corn contamination) than the corn growing on their own stalks!
Ygle is offline  
#21 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 05:54 PM
 
kalisis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: somewhere between here and there
Posts: 4,681
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Ok, maybe I'm not getting this right, but further down in the article, it says, "He estimated his yearly grocery bill at $1,300. This tallied almost exactly with A & P’s retail price of $1,306 for the food shown." That's not even close to 25% of his income...

Anyone have any thoughts?

*~* A * Mama to C and A * *~* I blog - PM me for the URL
kalisis is offline  
#22 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 06:01 PM
 
polyhymnia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Greater Seattle area
Posts: 2,551
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by anniej View Post
Ok, maybe I'm not getting this right, but further down in the article, it says, "He estimated his yearly grocery bill at $1,300. This tallied almost exactly with A & P’s retail price of $1,306 for the food shown." That's not even close to 25% of his income...

Anyone have any thoughts?
Was that $1300 in today's dollars, or in 1952 dollars? Cause the $30k was today's dollars.

mta: I think it's $1300 in 1952 dollars.

He made 1.96/hour, which for 52 weeks at 40 hours/week is 4076.80 per year. 1300 of 4076.8 is 31.8% ... so when you take into account any hours over 40 (not sure what hours/week he worked - assuming 50 hours total per week) it's almost exactly 25%.

jog.gif:bikenew.gif// knit.gif:reading.gif:notes2.gif // cat.gif:cat.gif 

Our precious baby girl is coming to turn our world upside down in January 2014!

polyhymnia is offline  
#23 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 06:16 PM
 
kijip's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 1,544
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by crayolaab View Post
Was that $1300 in today's dollars, or in 1952 dollars? Cause the $30k was today's dollars.
Yeah it is. All that would be many thousands of dollars now! The beef alone is $1300 easily.

Katie, mama to one big boy (6/03) and one little boy (12/08).
It is never the wrong time to do the right thing.
kijip is offline  
#24 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 06:16 PM
 
katheek77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 4,112
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Slightly OT, and slightly related: I have a home economics text from 1933, and in the "Let's Go Marketing!" chapter, it says that one should divide one's food dollar into five parts:

25c -Milk and cheese
25-20c - Vegetables and fruit
15-20c - Flour, wheat, corn meal, oats, bread, other grains
20-15c Butter, lard, sugar, molasses
15-20c - Meat, fish, eggs

Then it goes on to tell you how to divide your food dollar if you happen to have cows and/or a vegetable garden in the back yard. I wonder how that matches up with the post-war 1952 diet and our diet today...

One note the book makes is "Do you know that in theis country we spend more for meat than for any other kind of food? We eat approximately twice as much meat as Europeans do." Yah, no kidding.

PS...EVERY child under 2 years MUST have at least 2 teaspoonfuls of cod liver oil every day. He SHOULD have 3 or 4. (Emphasis - the book's!)

The book is pretty interesting, though...it's funny how much has come back full circle in a lot of ways. It advocates breastfeeding (discretely called "mother's milk") for infants, among other things. Alas, the prediction that we'd soon be "importing" reindeer meat from Alaska has not come to pass.
katheek77 is offline  
#25 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 07:56 PM
 
VeggieJoy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 118
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
According to that list, each person in their family consumed an average of 9 ounces meat and 3 tablespoons butter/shortening/margarine PER DAY. That's revolting.

Good amount of vegetables and fruits, though.
Quote:
That sounds delicious! Except for the margarine, 3 tablespoons of butter would be yummy, and probably not that far off from what most people eat (figure butter on you toast in the a.m. (1Tbls), some butter on your veggies or pasta and rolls at dinner (1tbls) and then another Tbls. at lunch.

And I could eat 9 oz of meat in a day. Figure 3 oz. in a sandwhich at lunch, and 4 at dinner (that's the size of a deck of cards, which is not very big at all.)
Quote:
Yes I think it seems very reasonable, and I suspect people consume rather a lot more these days!!
Quote:
What's revolting? It sounds pretty reasonable to me, actually, and probably far less meat than the average american consumes today. And the 3 tbsp of butter/shortening, I bet if you calculate how much trans fat Americans eat every day it would be close to that now, ICK!
I guess I'm coming from a nutritionist's veiwpoint: Just because that's what people DO eat doesn't mean that's what we SHOULD eat. With 3 tablespoons of butter/margarine/shortening a day, you would be almost maxing out your allotment for saturated fat (20g) and be eating 33 total grams of fat BEFORE you start counting the fat in your 9 ounces of meat. And don't even get me started on the cholesterol. That's a ton of junk in your arteries, especially when you consider that all of that evaporated milk, fresh whole milk, and cheese isn't low fat either.

In terms of 9 ounces of meat not seeming like a lot, according to the new USDA guidelines at mypyramid.gov, a woman of my size and age (145 lbs, 5'3", 24 yrs old) should only be consuming 5.5 ounces of meat AND beans per day.

I know that Americans want to believe that we can sustain this "meat 'n' potatoes" type of diet, but it's killing us.

Not that I feel passionate about this or anything.
VeggieJoy is offline  
#26 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 08:17 PM
 
rainyday's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,620
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by fek&fuzz View Post
That sounds delicious! Except for the margarine, 3 tablespoons of butter would be yummy, and probably not that far off from what most people eat (figure butter on you toast in the a.m. (1Tbls), some butter on your veggies or pasta and rolls at dinner (1tbls) and then another Tbls. at lunch.
You put a tablespoon of butter on your toast? That's a huge amount for toast, unless you're eating a huge amount of toast! The typical butter pat is 1 teaspoon, only 1/3 of a tablespoon (and still more than I can imagine putting on toast).

Another tablespoon on veggies? Maybe at a restaurant, but on a daily basis that would leave me feeling ill.

I'm actually really surprised how many people think that sounds yummy!

That being said, I can easily eat 3 tablespoons of butter a day sometimes, but it would be in baked goods, like cookies, and sure not an every day amount for me!
rainyday is offline  
#27 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 08:38 PM
Banned
 
2Sweeties1Angel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Missouri
Posts: 3,042
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I love butter. When I was little, my grandmother used to let me eat it by itself. No wonder I have weight problems now...

Anyway, I can easily eat more than 3 tablespoons of butter in a day. I try not to because it's not good for me. Lately, I guess since I've been cutting back, if I eat to much butter it makes me feel sick. Now if only I could Pepsi, cookies, etc. to make me feel sick I'd be good to go
2Sweeties1Angel is offline  
#28 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 08:50 PM
 
TiredX2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: it appears to be a handbasket
Posts: 20,029
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Knittin' in the Shade View Post
What's revolting? It sounds pretty reasonable to me, actually, and probably far less meat than the average american consumes today. And the 3 tbsp of butter/shortening, I bet if you calculate how much trans fat Americans eat every day it would be close to that now, ICK!
I also assumed they are using a lot of it in cooking AND things like greasing pans.

 

 

TiredX2 is offline  
#29 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 09:41 PM
 
tuansprincess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Idaho
Posts: 1,024
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by VeggieJoy View Post
I guess I'm coming from a nutritionist's veiwpoint: Just because that's what people DO eat doesn't mean that's what we SHOULD eat. With 3 tablespoons of butter/margarine/shortening a day, you would be almost maxing out your allotment for saturated fat (20g) and be eating 33 total grams of fat BEFORE you start counting the fat in your 9 ounces of meat. And don't even get me started on the cholesterol. That's a ton of junk in your arteries, especially when you consider that all of that evaporated milk, fresh whole milk, and cheese isn't low fat either.

In terms of 9 ounces of meat not seeming like a lot, according to the new USDA guidelines at mypyramid.gov, a woman of my size and age (145 lbs, 5'3", 24 yrs old) should only be consuming 5.5 ounces of meat AND beans per day.

I know that Americans want to believe that we can sustain this "meat 'n' potatoes" type of diet, but it's killing us.

Not that I feel passionate about this or anything.
Well - not everyone's nutrition needs are the same. Some ppl need to eat mostly raw foods, others mostly animal protein, others vegan perhaps. To call someone unhealthy for following a diet that is necessary for them isn't accurate.

Mamma to 3! nurslings Emma (4) Daniel (3) and our new baby Beth! 10/10/09
tuansprincess is offline  
#30 of 70 Old 01-09-2008, 09:47 PM
 
fek&fuzz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: down in the hunker
Posts: 8,679
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by rainyday View Post
You put a tablespoon of butter on your toast? That's a huge amount for toast, unless you're eating a huge amount of toast! The typical butter pat is 1 teaspoon, only 1/3 of a tablespoon (and still more than I can imagine putting on toast).

Another tablespoon on veggies? Maybe at a restaurant, but on a daily basis that would leave me feeling ill.

I'm actually really surprised how many people think that sounds yummy!

That being said, I can easily eat 3 tablespoons of butter a day sometimes, but it would be in baked goods, like cookies, and sure not an every day amount for me!
I personally don't, but if you put a "pat" of butter on each piece, there's almost 1 tablespoon. And again, I don't use any butter on my veggies, but back then they might have. And I've been around families who have rolls with butter (or biscuits with butter in them) with dinner.

Or maybe the mom was just baking cookies everyday for afterschool snacks, and that's where all the butter went.

Funny how no one in that family was obese despite the fact that they ate such huge amounts of butter.
fek&fuzz is offline  
Reply

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off