s/o Oprah thread--frugality for the high income crowd - Page 5 - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#121 of 141 Old 10-16-2008, 12:57 AM
 
mnt_mommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 56
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Lots and lots of great feedback here! Some of it critical, but all of it supportive!
mnt_mommy is offline  
#122 of 141 Old 12-27-2008, 03:47 AM
Banned
 
SuzanneDeAz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 102
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
what are swaps?
SuzanneDeAz is offline  
#123 of 141 Old 12-27-2008, 04:08 AM
 
becoming's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 11,886
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We are in exactly the situation you described--accustomed to spending spending spending, and now with the economy in the crapper, we're trying to save. It's really been a challenge for us to switch gears. After months of buying whatever we want, saving money almost feels like a punishment.

We're 26 with three kids. DH is in the oil industry and got a huge promotion about a year ago that took us from being semi-broke all the time to having a crazy (to us) amount of money. Although we have a fair amount of medical bills and ridiculously high car payments, our monthly bills (including utilities, mortgage, health & car insurance) are only about 1/3 of our income, if that. So we should be able to save tons, right? WRONG. We are both spenders by nature, so in the past year since he got his promotion, we've been able to save a whopping $2,300, and that's been saved in the past two months! :

I'm going to read this whole thread tomorrow, but I just wanted to introduce myself. This should be an interesting discussion and hopefully helpful to our situation!
becoming is offline  
#124 of 141 Old 12-27-2008, 04:10 AM
 
becoming's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 11,886
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Oh, and avengingophelia -- we spend *hundreds* of dollars on eating out each month, so I'm right there with you on the poor choices! We can learn together!
becoming is offline  
#125 of 141 Old 12-28-2008, 12:18 AM
Banned
 
SuzanneDeAz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 102
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by becoming View Post
Oh, and avengingophelia -- we spend *hundreds* of dollars on eating out each month, so I'm right there with you on the poor choices! We can learn together!
I think the economy will go down hill and it will affect almost everyone in one way or another. So if you are able to save it would be a good thing.
SuzanneDeAz is offline  
#126 of 141 Old 12-28-2008, 03:32 AM
 
becoming's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 11,886
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We are saving. We're up to saving around $2K a month, which hopefully we can continue and even increase in the coming months.
becoming is offline  
#127 of 141 Old 12-28-2008, 03:43 AM
 
Drummer's Wife's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Land of Enchantment
Posts: 11,793
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by becoming View Post
Oh, and avengingophelia -- we spend *hundreds* of dollars on eating out each month, so I'm right there with you on the poor choices! We can learn together!
This has been our biggest problem for quite some time, until recently. Now, we try and limit going out to eat or ordering in to once a week (well, and dh eats out for lunch but it's cheap- fast food). The thing is that we really haven't saved any money by not eating out as much, we just spend it on more groceries. But, I figure at least we are eating healthier by cooking it ourselves and that is the biggest motivation for me to prepare meals everyday.

ETA: and we're similar, Lindsay. DH got a promotion a year ago and we moved to another state with a lower cost of living. So, we went from barely making it to actually having extra money to spend. and that's what we've done, spend it! on what exactly, I don't know I've taken over the finances just recently and am paying bills and such, it's just such a new concept to not live paycheck to paycheck. I still try to be frugal in many ways, but it's not because money is super tight, atm.

ribboncesarean.gif cesareans happen.
Drummer's Wife is offline  
#128 of 141 Old 12-28-2008, 04:36 AM
 
Sarah W's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Dupont, WA
Posts: 1,128
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by becoming View Post
Oh, and avengingophelia -- we spend *hundreds* of dollars on eating out each month, so I'm right there with you on the poor choices! We can learn together!
This was us, too when we lived in WA. The only thing we spent more on than food was our mortgage. It's pretty sobering when you crunch the numbers after a few months. However, it's also hard to be frugal when you don't have to be, KWIM?

I think a big thing is to set parameters for your spending in each category and stick to it. If you see that you're getting close to your limit, see if you can push off a purchase until the following month.

Keep doing the things you love, just try to do less of it or see if you can find a cheaper way to do it. Spending habits are just that-habits.

Being without debt is one of the best things you can do for yourself. Once you get into a cycle of living without debt, life is so much easier.
Sarah W is offline  
#129 of 141 Old 12-28-2008, 07:38 AM
 
cicatrix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: City of Books, Australia
Posts: 68
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My partner and I are sitting real pretty when it comes to money. Both of us got large raises when we moved to our current city, so even though we're paying a mortgage and rent, by renting out the house in our old city and the raises we're still heaps ahead. The moves (we moved seperately because of different start dates) were costly, so were the months of no rental income and seperate households even though I was sharing with friends.

The biggest thing we do is salary sacrifice (certain expenses are taken out or our pay prior to tax) private health insurance. If I decided on gym membership, I could do that as well. I don't know if salary sacrifice exists in the US, but it makes life heaps easier since the insurance is our biggest expense after the mortgage. We don't 'need' private insurance since I live in the land of universal healthcare, but it made sense to start it now. We get some perks and I think it'll be great for the birth and afterwards. We also pay off our credit cards entirely each month - they're not for purchases we can't afford, they're for tracking purposes (we're pants at remembering anything) and auto-paying some bills. We're on capped phone plans, VOIP as part of our internet and no cable or anything like that. We run to some expensive hobbies (*glares at computers and consoles*) but we don't have other expenses (rarely go out in the new city, don't drink much and only drink spirits, don't party, don't shop).

Taking lunches has made a huge difference - we did really well back when I could cook, because I'd chuck some stuff in the slow cooker, other stuff in the rice cooker and then a roast or a pasta dish and that was a whole bundle of meals that maybe took an hour or so to set up. My partner likes cooking far less than I do, and is less likely to 'chuck stuff together', so we're having to change that up a bit. Mostly frozen meals, sandwich stuff at work and salads for me. It's actually helped him bond at work, because his team is entirely female (apart from him) so they tend to get the leftovers for lunch thing, and they fuss over him for cooking! I work in a library, and most of us bring lunch or make it at work. So it's actually helped in that sense. I make sure I've got snacks as well - that killer trip home where half the buses don't run is a lot easier to handle if you've got something tasty to nosh on. Even if you grab a hot chocolate, it isn't hot chocolate and cake/snack to tide you over.

Wine is a killer. Do you have a collection or is it drink as soon as purchased? My best friends live in the Barossa and they spend a lot on wine (given her parents own a winery and he works at one...) but they strictly budget wine purchases and try and use their collection if they want something special. I'm figuring the same can apply to crafting - budget then stash, rather than constantly adding without really using it well.

Both my partner and I have seperate accounts and joint accounts. We're married, about to have our first kid. And I'm not giving up my account and I'm certainly not 'spending his money'. Apart from the facts of the matter (he only earns about $15k more, I earn a decent salary on my own - AvengingOphelia's situation is the opposite so it applies even less to her) there's the whole idea that just because we're a partnership, doesn't mean we're one being. We run big purchases by each other, we share our money, but we have seperate accounts for our seperate stuff. We aren't the same person, or the same entity or even have the same needs/wants. Joint accounts don't do squat to ensure equal access/entitlement - that's a relationship factor.
cicatrix is offline  
#130 of 141 Old 12-28-2008, 07:43 AM
 
Sarah W's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Dupont, WA
Posts: 1,128
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'll second the fact that taking lunches makes a HUGE difference. I can't leave for lunch so someone passes a menu around, we order and it gets delivered. We're in Key West, so most things are fairly pricey. Lunch is usually $10-$15 a day. That adds up really quickly. I can bring a decent lunch from home for a couple dollars. It makes a huge difference if you're budgeting.
Sarah W is offline  
#131 of 141 Old 12-28-2008, 09:45 AM
 
EmsMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 1,383
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Some things that might help in a transition away from eating out are: 1. Plan for the meal out, a date and a budget. Try skipping drinks, appetizers and desserts because they are often the biggest mark-up. 2. Try eating out only for dessert or appetizers. You get the "experience" with a smaller budget. 3. Find a local store that sells good pre-made food (grocery stores often have some decent stuff, Trader Joe's is also good for good frozen food). Keep some on hand for those nights when you feel as if you just must eat out. That kind of food is expensive but not as expensive as eating at a restaurant. And you can always add in a bottle of wine (or whatever), some candlelight, soft music and good china. Heck, you could even use paper dishes so you don't have to clean up. (I find that so hard to say! We don't even use paper/plastic for parties anymore! But while you are in transition, it can help!). If you actually got a jar and put in the $ you usually spend eating out minus what you spent eating in, you might enjoy it as a game. Also, if you don't know how to cook, learning how will save a ton of money and improve your health over time. It can take a while to transition from regular eating out to frugal black-belt cooking up a meal from dried beans! Lots and lots of steps in between... I am in the same place as the original poster. Above average income on a national scale, but where we live our household income is a bit low. But we have no debt so in the big picture we are probably actually better off than our neighbors. But the reason we have no debt is because of the frugal lifestyle we practice (happily!). There are a few of us high income frugal types out there, you know! Also, the less you spend the more you can help out others, which is a nice thing.
EmsMom is online now  
#132 of 141 Old 12-29-2008, 03:48 AM
Banned
 
SuzanneDeAz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 102
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I keep on reading about "swaps". I did a search on them but still am not clear. I get the impression it is two people swaping clothing or other articles. If this is true than why is there an expense for a swap? Can any one explain?
SuzanneDeAz is offline  
#133 of 141 Old 12-29-2008, 05:00 AM
 
annethcz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: on the beautiful prairie of MN
Posts: 9,947
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuzanneDeAz View Post
I keep on reading about "swaps". I did a search on them but still am not clear. I get the impression it is two people swaping clothing or other articles. If this is true than why is there an expense for a swap? Can any one explain?
You pay to ship/mail the item.

New signature, same old me: Ann- mama of 2 boys and 2 girls, partnered to a fabulous man.
I'm an unintentional weasel feeder and I suck at proofreading.
annethcz is offline  
#134 of 141 Old 12-29-2008, 02:16 PM
 
Staceyy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 247
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Why in the world are your pet expenses so high?
Staceyy is offline  
#135 of 141 Old 12-29-2008, 11:23 PM
Banned
 
Roxy05's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 9
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuzanneDeAz View Post
I think the economy will go down hill and it will affect almost everyone in one way or another. So if you are able to save it would be a good thing.

I think everyone here has some great eco friendly ideas. I think its admirable we are all searching for the answers on how to be good stewards of our earth and enviroment. our actions will not just save the earth, but it will benefit our health, and our wallets as well.

I am concerned about excessive use of water once one eliminates toilet paper, plastic or paper diapers, or menstraul products.

I was once in a discussion about what the early humans , before toilet paper existed. Apparently priests used to attach some sort of sponge product to a stick and scrub their bums. Of course many used natural products, such as leaves. But even more primative, many dragged their butts across the lawn, similiar to the way dogs drag their butts across the carpets and the grass.
It may sound too uncivilized but would any here consider doing that? Perhaps a dip in a pond or lake afterwards, or a stream, would prevent any residue.

This way the water is not being wasted, because it is already there. I think this is probably the most eco friendly idea. It is hard for me to consider this option. I would not just go in my backyard and start scooting across the lawn, but perhaps maybe a side area that is sectioned off? Like the family grass? I know this may sound way out there, and the idea needs some fine tuning. none the less, I dont think anyone can argue that this is the most eco friendly idea
Roxy05 is offline  
#136 of 141 Old 12-29-2008, 11:52 PM
Banned
 
Roxy05's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 9
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cicatrix View Post
My partner and I are sitting real pretty when it comes to money.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cicatrix View Post

Please dont take this the wrong way. I just want to gently comment that when using the word "partner" the use is to describe a gay partnership. I am assuming you do not live in california because out here that is the only use for the description of "partner". While in other parts of the world, some may refer to each other if they are an unmarried man or woman cohabitating, as partner ( though I have never heard it used that way I am just trying to give the benefit of the doubt )... even if it acceptable in parts of the country, it wont be for long. I say this because california has always been the state that is looked to as an example. This state is the state considered the ground breaker state. We are looked to as a model of what the rest of the world will eventually be doing. or I should say, the US. I am not talking about other countries of course. With the exception of england, as england looks to san francisco to get an idea of americans.

Both of us got large raises when we moved to our current city, so even though we're paying a mortgage and rent, by renting out the house in our old city and the raises we're still heaps ahead.

Excellent!

The moves (we moved seperately because of different start dates) were costly, so were the months of no rental income and seperate households even though I was sharing with friends.

The biggest thing we do is salary sacrifice (certain expenses are taken out or our pay prior to tax) private health insurance.

If I decided on gym membership, I could do that as well. I don't know if salary sacrifice exists in the US, but it makes life heaps easier since the insurance is our biggest expense after the mortgage. We don't 'need' private insurance since I live in the land of universal healthcare, but it made sense to start it now. We get some perks and I think it'll be great for the birth and afterwards. We also pay off our credit cards entirely each month - they're not for purchases we can't afford, they're for tracking purposes (we're pants at remembering anything) and auto-paying some bills. We're on capped phone plans, VOIP as part of our internet and no cable or anything like that. We run to some expensive hobbies (*glares at computers and consoles*) but we don't have other expenses (rarely go out in the new city, don't drink much and only drink spirits, don't party, don't shop).

Taking lunches has made a huge difference - we did really well back when I could cook, because I'd chuck some stuff in the slow cooker, other stuff in the rice cooker and then a roast or a pasta dish and that was a whole bundle of meals that maybe took an hour or so to set up. My partner likes cooking far less than I do, and is less likely to 'chuck stuff together', so we're having to change that up a bit. Mostly frozen meals, sandwich stuff at work and salads for me. It's actually helped him bond at work, because his team is entirely female (apart from him) so they tend to get the leftovers for lunch thing, and they fuss over him for cooking! I work in a library, and most of us bring lunch or make it at work. So it's actually helped in that sense. I make sure I've got snacks as well - that killer trip home where half the buses don't run is a lot easier to handle if you've got something tasty to nosh on. Even if you grab a hot chocolate, it isn't hot chocolate and cake/snack to tide you over.

Wine is a killer. Do you have a collection or is it drink as soon as purchased? My best friends live in the Barossa and they spend a lot on wine (given her parents own a winery and he works at one...) but they strictly budget wine purchases and try and use their collection if they want something special. I'm figuring the same can apply to crafting - budget then stash, rather than constantly adding without really using it well.

Both my partner and I have seperate accounts and joint accounts. We're married, about to have our first kid. And I'm not giving up my account and I'm certainly not 'spending his money'. Apart from the facts of the matter (he only earns about $15k more, I earn a decent salary on my own - AvengingOphelia's situation is the opposite so it applies even less to her) there's the whole idea that just because we're a partnership, doesn't mean we're one being. We run big purchases by each other, we share our money, but we have seperate accounts for our seperate stuff. We aren't the same person, or the same entity or even have the same needs/wants. Joint accounts don't do squat to ensure equal access/entitlement - that's a relationship factor.


Once baby arrives, it's always best to go from 2 incomes to one. I am concerned that you speak so much about seperate accounts. You will need to sacrifice your salary once the baby arrives. At this point, I think you will see the importance of not having seperate accounts any longer. It is completely not appropriate once he and she turn into 3.
Roxy05 is offline  
#137 of 141 Old 12-30-2008, 06:07 AM
 
cicatrix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: City of Books, Australia
Posts: 68
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We're dropping to one income for about six months, then I'll be back at work and he's probably going to go to part-time/work from home. My salary will be on hold for most of that, then his will drop permanently. Seperate accounts is far more convenient for the two of us, and quite frankly, the idea that one shouldn't have seperate things simply because of marriage/children kind of freaks me out. The kid is going to have their own account as well - it's something our parents did for us and we'll continue.

We have no illusions about permanency. We're in it for life, but that doesn't stop a speeding car/drunk driver/virus/infection - so we both have good credit histories, money and accounts we can access without going through the other. It also means we can surprise each other with presents, know exactly what's happening in our accounts without figuring if the other has gotten the groceries. All expenses (except groceries) come out of the joint account, both our pays go into that account and we transfer money into the personal accounts for cash money, personal purchases and groceries. Kid or not, those reasons don't change.
cicatrix is offline  
#138 of 141 Old 12-30-2008, 02:46 PM
 
annethcz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: on the beautiful prairie of MN
Posts: 9,947
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roxy05 View Post

Once baby arrives, it's always best to go from 2 incomes to one. I am concerned that you speak so much about seperate accounts. You will need to sacrifice your salary once the baby arrives. At this point, I think you will see the importance of not having seperate accounts any longer. It is completely not appropriate once he and she turn into 3.
Roxy, I see that you're new here. Welcome!

Although many mothers (including myself) choose to stay at home and stop working once they have children, many do not. Choosing to be a working mother is a completely valid choice and a good option for many mothers. It is NOT always best for a family to become a one income family just as expenses increase with the addition of a new child. To make such a sweeping generalization is dismissive of the financial and psychological realities that many families face.

As for the issue of joint vs. separate accounts, again I think that a one-size-fits-all approach is not the answer. While some couples do well with joint accounts, other couples do better with separate accounts. I think that it is completely appropriate for a married couple with children to have separate accounts if that is what works best for their situation. In my relationship, DH and I have joint accounts for our household (although I did have a separate account when I was a business owner). But my parents, who have been happily married for over 35 years, have always had separate bank accounts for household expenses, and this system works VERY well for them.

While it's great for you to share what works for you, I don't think it's appropriate to say that if a certain way of doing things doesn't work for you that it won't work for anyone.

New signature, same old me: Ann- mama of 2 boys and 2 girls, partnered to a fabulous man.
I'm an unintentional weasel feeder and I suck at proofreading.
annethcz is offline  
#139 of 141 Old 12-31-2008, 01:58 AM
 
skreader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Hong Kong
Posts: 681
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
DH and I earn good incomes and we are frugal. We are frugal by upbringing, by habit, and by desire.

We pack our lunches most days (salads)

DH brings his own coffee or tea to brew at work. I do buy a coffee or a soda, but where I work it usually comes to about US$ 2 per day.

I usually take the bus to work, as does DH.

We buy new clothes maybe once or twice a year - usually when our clothes wear out. I have some good wool skirts that I've had for almost 15 years that I wear to work in winter and they are still in good condition.

We shop around a lot before any major purchase and look for discounts (for example, the "floor model" for some durable goods).

But I think the real trick for what we do is that we save up for things BEFORE we spend. If we want something, we plan for it and save money for it and then we get it.

Intentional Living
skreader is offline  
#140 of 141 Old 12-31-2008, 06:52 AM
 
cicatrix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: City of Books, Australia
Posts: 68
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Oh dang, I missed the partner bit - sorry Roxy. I'm from Australia, not the US and partner is much more in use here to describe one's spouse - defacto/married/same sex. I think because defacto partnerships are much more common and far less controversial (although there is still a whole load of pressure on defacto couples to marry). As for the California/San Francisco stuff, I'm kinda lost. I'm not imitating anything, I'm using the language I'm most comfortable with.

I didn't even think about coffee/tea or anything like that. Both my partner and I get free tea/coffee at work, milk supplied. I've cut down a lot (developed a taste for 'real' coffee and tea + getting more sensitive to the effects of caffeine) and it makes a difference. I enjoy it more and I may spend more per cup, but less per month.

My big spend area is food, even though we're not quite as prolific in our spending as some : so that's where we're looking at cutting back over the next few months to make sure we've got good habits for when the kid comes along. Lunch is coming along, but snacks are the other area and convenience foods. Luckily our best friends are coming over just before the birth and filling our freezer, so hopefully we keep up that habit.
cicatrix is offline  
#141 of 141 Old 12-31-2008, 09:18 AM
 
sanguine_speed's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 3,634
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cicatrix View Post
Oh dang, I missed the partner bit - sorry Roxy. I'm from Australia, not the US and partner is much more in use here to describe one's spouse - defacto/married/same sex. I think because defacto partnerships are much more common and far less controversial (although there is still a whole load of pressure on defacto couples to marry). As for the California/San Francisco stuff, I'm kinda lost. I'm not imitating anything, I'm using the language I'm most comfortable with.

.
I also call my spouse 'partner' and we are not gay. We are 'married' by common-law, which means we aren't legally married. Language is important and powerful, and I choose to define my own relationship using the word "partner". And I don't apologize for it.

4 kids under 10
sanguine_speed is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off