Cooking roos - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 12 Old 11-01-2010, 07:53 PM - Thread Starter
 
Erinz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: On a hill in California
Posts: 1,493
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We cull out our extra roosters when needed (aggressiveness or just too dang many, why can't they all be born hens?!). This weekend we culled 4 of them, one was nearly 3 years old and the rest were 6-8 months. The 3 year old was a GLW, 2 were a Cuckoo Maran mix and one (a real jerk to the hens!) was a Birchen Maran.

Just curious how those who eat their roos cook them. I do a slow simmer of the entire carcass overnight in my stock pot (on the woodstove in the winter, now THAT is efficiency!) with some garlic and celery and onion. Makes for tender meat and excellent stock. I'm wondering if it's worth trying a different method. We have 2 more (couldn't catch them) to do this weekend.

Thanks for your thoughts! I appreciate it.

Erin sharing life with a burly husband and two rad boys 7/06 & 5/09 : : Zone 9-ish
Erinz is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#2 of 12 Old 11-03-2010, 04:34 PM - Thread Starter
 
Erinz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: On a hill in California
Posts: 1,493
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Doesn't anyone cook roos?

Erin sharing life with a burly husband and two rad boys 7/06 & 5/09 : : Zone 9-ish
Erinz is offline  
#3 of 12 Old 11-03-2010, 07:23 PM
 
greenmulberry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Iowa
Posts: 661
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Oh I will be next year!!!! We have had only hens so far, but decided to hatch out eggs next year and eat the boys.

I have heard of cooking roos long and slow in the crock pot with BBQ sauce, shredding the meat and mixing with the juice and sauce, for a chicken version of BBQ 'pork' sandwiches. Now that sounds like something I have to try.
greenmulberry is offline  
#4 of 12 Old 11-03-2010, 08:25 PM
 
Hedgehog Mtn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 351
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've found that anything under 24 hours is like eating leather. Besides a long slow simmer I don't know of any other way. We cook on wood all year so it works
Hedgehog Mtn is offline  
#5 of 12 Old 11-03-2010, 10:01 PM
 
1jooj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 5,577
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We do culled roos in the pressure cooker, usually for stew with dumplings or over rice.

I also do a long, slow-cooked stew for traditional couscous.

I find it's better when I cook and let it cool in the stock before taking meat off the bones, so it doesn't dry out.
1jooj is offline  
#6 of 12 Old 11-13-2010, 04:23 AM
 
Hibou's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: a little house on the prairie
Posts: 1,372
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

We usually use ours for stock too, saving the meat afterwards for enchiladas, pot pies, etc. 

 

But last year I came across a recipe for coq-au-vin that piqued my traditional foodie curiosity.  'Coq' is the French word for rooster- not chicken or hen- and the traditional way to cook it was to first marinate it in something acidic (a bottle of wine), along with other herbs and spices, then to slowly cook it in sauce.  Here's the blog post I wrote about it, with the recipe included, if you're interested.

Hibou is offline  
#7 of 12 Old 11-13-2010, 05:41 AM
 
sparkygirl74's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Little house in the medium woods
Posts: 386
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Hibou View Post

We usually use ours for stock too, saving the meat afterwards for enchiladas, pot pies, etc. 

 

But last year I came across a recipe for coq-au-vin that piqued my traditional foodie curiosity.  'Coq' is the French word for rooster- not chicken or hen- and the traditional way to cook it was to first marinate it in something acidic (a bottle of wine), along with other herbs and spices, then to slowly cook it in sauce.  Here's the blog post I wrote about it, with the recipe included, if you're interested.

Thanks for the great recipe! We are butchering two year old roos tomorrow so we don't have to feed them through the winter and to give the ladies a break ;) I love to cook with wine!
 

sparkygirl74 is offline  
#8 of 12 Old 11-14-2010, 03:48 PM
 
mumm's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 1,604
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Erinz View Post

Doesn't anyone cook roos?



Well, I only checked this thread out because I thought you were talking kangaROOs!  confused.gif

I was curious to see how that worked. 

 

We only have hens and buy chicks so I can't help wtht ROOsters


Me.  With 1 spouse, 4 kids, 16 chickens, 74 matchbox cars, 968,562+ legos, a dishwasher waiting to be emptied, a washing machine waiting to be filled and a lost cup of tea in the house.

mumm is online now  
#9 of 12 Old 11-16-2010, 09:34 PM
 
Synchronicity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 3
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

When you kill the roos, be sure to save some of the long neck feathers. People use them for fly-tying. I'm giving a whole section of neck feathers to my BIL for Christmas this year.

 

Hibou, I really enjoyed your recipe!

Synchronicity is offline  
#10 of 12 Old 11-16-2010, 09:38 PM
 
ASusan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Midwest
Posts: 4,839
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

From the title, I thought this was a thread about cooking Kangaroos. They're actually quite good, but I couldn't give advice on cooking them.


DS, 10/07. Allergies: peanut, egg, wheat. We've added dairy back in. And taken it back out again. It causes sandpaper skin with itchy patches and thrashing during sleep. Due w/ #2 late April, 2012.

ASusan is offline  
#11 of 12 Old 11-23-2010, 03:10 PM - Thread Starter
 
Erinz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: On a hill in California
Posts: 1,493
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Hibou THANK YOU for the recipe idea, I didn't even think of that. I too love cooking with wine :)

Funny on the kangaroo -- must be regional because I've never heard of a kangaroo called just a roo! haha!

 

I do generally wait for them to cool in the stock, but will be sure I do from here out -- makes sense that it would be more tender. Thank you.

 

We have one more to do in the next week or so, will totally try Hibou's recipe.


Erin sharing life with a burly husband and two rad boys 7/06 & 5/09 : : Zone 9-ish
Erinz is offline  
#12 of 12 Old 11-25-2010, 01:57 PM
 
Greenmama2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Mountains of Blue, Australia
Posts: 269
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I thought you meant kangaroos too! Kangaroo meat is excellent :) As for roosters - Coq au Vin sounds good.


Grateful mama striving to respect the two precious beings entrusted to me DD '06 and DS '09
Greenmama2 is offline  
Reply

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off