The end of the world! And other thoughts on self-sufficiency... - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

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Old 02-19-2011, 12:13 AM
 
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Originally Posted by diana_of_the_dunes View Post



 


Wow.  I never realized that Canada had legislation mandating "crime" reporting.  Granted, there are plenty of tattle-talers here who call police (or code enforcement, if their locality has it) for every little thing.  "They play music too loud," or "Their shed is 4 inches too close to the property line," and similar complaints.  Working in law enforcement, things like that drive me mad.  Why can't you go ask your neighbor politely to turn it down?  Why do you care about your neighbor's shed?  Most officers I work with have similar feelings and don't bother so much with the small stuff.  I suppose you could call it selective enforcement, but I view it as good time and resource management... 

 

I also never realized that inalienable rights were so unique to the US.  Even if you don't chose to believe in God, the fact that those rights belong to you and are not a construct of the government...  That would most certainly bother me.  I'm not always happy with our government's actions, but I'm grateful for the protections outlined in the Constitution that keep things from getting too out of hand.  All we need to do is look at the austerity measures happening all across Europe to see that a more socialist approach to government is not the proper road, economically or socially. 

 

I don't blame you for wanting to leave.

 

Thanks. :) I appreciate your considerate response. I am watching with interest, how unalienable rights are upheld/actualised in the myriad major changes that are happening in the U.S.

 

I'm not surprised that Canadians are less concerned with this than Americans, mostly because culturally, Americans know they have the right to overthrow any gov't they deem unfit, even if they wouldn't act on it. Just the knowledge of one's guaranteed freedom is very powerful, and the reality that mine is not unalienable, but only court-enforced, is unnerving to me, even in the absence of overt enforcement by gov't agents. I could live peacefully here all of my life, but I would always know that I am not free, and that has an effect, even on those who are not formally aware of it; it's a built-in feature of Canadian culture that is unsee-able without knowing. 
 


Well, I've been absent for 8 months, and during that time, it turns out that I have completely transformed. You are all precious. Thank you for being here and sharing your lives. You are truly a gift. namaste.gif Jan. 23, 2012

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Old 02-21-2011, 07:41 PM
 
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Originally Posted by diana_of_the_dunes View Post



 


Wow.  I never realized that Canada had legislation mandating "crime" reporting.  Granted, there are plenty of tattle-talers here who call police (or code enforcement, if their locality has it) for every little thing.  "They play music too loud," or "Their shed is 4 inches too close to the property line," and similar complaints.  Working in law enforcement, things like that drive me mad.  Why can't you go ask your neighbor politely to turn it down?  Why do you care about your neighbor's shed?  Most officers I work with have similar feelings and don't bother so much with the small stuff.  I suppose you could call it selective enforcement, but I view it as good time and resource management... 

 

I also never realized that inalienable rights were so unique to the US.  Even if you don't chose to believe in God, the fact that those rights belong to you and are not a construct of the government...  That would most certainly bother me.  I'm not always happy with our government's actions, but I'm grateful for the protections outlined in the Constitution that keep things from getting too out of hand.  All we need to do is look at the austerity measures happening all across Europe to see that a more socialist approach to government is not the proper road, economically or socially. 

 

I don't blame you for wanting to leave.



Yeah - having lived in the US and Canada I would be far more concerned about government control of rights and freedoms in the US than in Canada especially since the election of Bush and 9/11. Numerous sources rank US as being way down the list on individual rights and freedoms - below Canada in many measurements. I'm sure the PP's interpretation of how our Canadian system of government (court system included) works is grounded in her experience and worldview but I am not so sure that it's an accurate interpretation of our laws, or our constitution (which contains our Charter of Rights and Freedoms and also limits the power of government).  As with all things it pays to do independent research and be aware of biases.

 

This is veering into politics and so is likely not the most efficient place for this discussion.


Blessed partner to a great guy, and mama to 4 amazing kids. Unfortunate target of an irrationally angry IRL stalker.

Holding on to anger is like grasping a hot coal with the intent of throwing it at someone else; you are the one who gets burned. ~ Buddha

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Old 03-12-2011, 02:56 PM
 
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I don't think you are crazy at all OP. Or, if you are, we are too. wink1.gif Just 4 years ago, DH and I were your typical "I want the American Dream" types. We sold our perfectly fine house to build a different house and went all out on the options and the landscaping, etc, etc. Then a year ago we did a Dave Ramsey class in our church and it totally changed our minds about debt and not being "slaves" to lenders. We knew things had to change.

 

Fast-forward to now and we have our beautiful "American Dream" home on the market. We know we'll be taking a loss, but we are pulling money out of retirement to pay for it. As I type this, DH is at a 9-day Emergency Wilderness Responders course with 3 other like-minded friends. My sister and I just finished putting 375lbs of red wheat berries into mylar bags. We purchased guns and ammo and DH just applied for his conceal to carry license. We have BOB (bug out bags) packed and ready to go. Our food storage grows weekly. We plan on renting for a couple of years (God willing) and then either purchasing a plot of land to put a yurt on, or possibly relocating with several other friends to a large compound-type facility. So, yeah, we are right there with you!

 

I think a pp hit the nail on the head when they said that Americans have been slumbering. Our lifestyles are absolutely not sustainable. The debt that this country has accrued cannot continue. The world may not end, but we may experience something like a very, very severe depression. I read not too long ago that up until the 1930s, the majority of Americans were farmers. The same thing can hardly be said today. Most of us are completely dependent on the "grid" and the government to the point where really even a smallish event would bring utter chaos, in my opinion.

 

As for preparing, there's so much you can do and you can build a little at a time. Do what you can and then don't dwell on it! We've:

1. Made up BOB (bug out bags) for each member of the family. A change of clothes, water treatment and contains, food rations, flashlights, knives, compass, basic medical kit, waterproof matches, howler whistles, etc, etc.

2. Started using coupons to compile a 3-month emergency stash. This is fairly easy because the food items don't need to be terribly long-term stable, but they'll come in handy in a short-term emergency.

3. Been slowly building a long-term food stash that will eventually be kept at our fall-back place. You can buy dry goods in bulk from LDS canneries and put them into mylar bags yourself.

4.  Buying water barrels and chemicals/filters to treat water.

5. Building up a community of like-minded people who can help if needed.

 

The way I see it, we have insurance on our home, cars, and our health. We obviously all know things can go bad in those areas and the insurance is there in case it's needed. How is it a bad idea to also have "insurance" on food, water, and necessities? These are the very basic human needs. Don't sit around worrying yourself sick, but do what you can, when you can.

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Old 03-12-2011, 07:26 PM
 
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I'm not going to get into the political side of this because I don't want to offend anyone by my personal views or get off topic. I'm not going to get into the end of the world theories either. I have my own opinions about all of it and honestly it's personal. I'm going to keep it that way but...

 

I agree with the pp that the "American way of life" is not sustainable as is. This doesn't have to involve political or conspiracy theory leanings either. It's just the way it is and I think we all understand that to some extent things need to change. We're all on the same natural family living board because we feel certain things are better for our family and/or we want to help protect the environment and our families better than 'mainstream' ways do. Without getting 'cooky' or paranoid there are always things that can happen out of our control and temporarily shut down our daily way of life be it a winter storm, hurricane, or even unemployment/job loss taking away our income and ability to support our life. I agree with the idea of we keep insurance on homes, cars, and life but need to have 'insurance' for our basic human needs as well.

 

The best thing I can say here is to think it through. Decide what you are preparing for to assess your needs. Start simple so that you don't get overwhelmed. A good place to start is a bug out bag or emergency kit. Basics are shelter, air, food, and water. You can look at camping/hunting gear for supplies that would make things easier shelter wise (like a solar shower). Add more food storage little by little. Get a way to treat and store water. These are all basic things that can help you if you have an emergency situation. If you want longer term self sufficiency then start finding ways to work towards it. Garden, get animals, can/preserve your own food. Get a grinder for grinding your own grains. Reduce energy use and cut out unnecessary electric items (can opener, use a carpet sweeper instead of vacuum, etc). Just think about it to decide what you feel comfortable with and may need for whatever you're preparing for. Start making a list of things you use or buy and then see if you can come up with a way to reduce the cost or provide it for yourself. HTH.


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