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#1 of 30 Old 11-29-2011, 12:04 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Does anyone have any experience with having a line dryer in the home? I live in a condo, without a yard, in Alaska.. so an outdoor line isn't an option lol! Our house uses electric heat so I wanted to line dry to start saving costs on that, but have no idea how to make it work indoors. Any experience would be great :)


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#2 of 30 Old 11-29-2011, 02:27 PM
 
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I would also love to hear experience.  My parents line dry at their house but they have wood heat so there is an area that is very warm and dry.  We have electric and I am not sure it would work.


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#3 of 30 Old 11-29-2011, 03:56 PM
 
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Good places for installing a clothesline: balcony and bathroom (I'm used to old-style buildings where bathrooms and toilets are separate.)

 

You could also buy a collapsible clothesline:

 

http://greenbabyguide.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/hills-expanding-indoor-clothes-drying-rack-clothesline.jpg

 

Or one that hangs over a radiator:

 

http://www.airershop.co.uk/images/LeifheitQuartettUniversalRadiatorClothesDryerProd.jpg

 

We hang our clothes on radiators and even on doors (the doors have an excellent paint that never reacts to any moisture.) We use over-the-door hooks and use those for drying clothes that are on hangers.

 

This reminds me, I need to buy a clothesline for the bathroom and install it. One more "to do" for the list.

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#4 of 30 Old 11-29-2011, 07:15 PM
 
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I live in northern Canada, and I line dry inside with electric heat.  My grandfather loves to talk about winter outdoor line drying, but I've only ever done it once or twice in the winter.  Once was in the dead of winter and all our towels dried stiff as boards!  It was amazing.  I'd put them down and they'd clunk because they were so hard!  The air is really dry where I live, so they still evaporate in the cold.  I think I'd like to try it again a few times this winter, but they still need to be brought in and hung up again, so it's kind of doubling the work.  But I think it would be good on those really clear, bright (and always the coldest! lol) winter days, to sun out stains on diapers.  That is, when there's actually a fair bit of daylight.  One of the problems I have is that I'll do my wash in the afternoon, and then it gets dark!

 

Anyway, this thread is about indoor line drying, so I'll get back on topic.  :)

 

We have two things for hanging up clothes indoors: a retractable clothesline (and I'll be honest, it's rarely retracted, at least in the winter) and a drying rack that I picked up at a yard sale.  What's nice about the rack is that I don't have to reach up so high to put things on it, and when it's not in use, it folds flat and I hide it behind a dresser.  I can also take it outside in the summer.  You could put it on your balcony in the summer (or you could even do it in winter, and move the whole thing indoors once they've freeze-dried).  I usually place it near a heater so that it helps dry quicker.  Also, it's good for laying things flat.  I usually just put things wherever around the house if they're of the 'dry flat' variety, but I could also use the rack, and the clothes would get circulation on both sides.

 

I mostly use the line though, for all the positives I've listed for the drying rack.  I don't know why, probably because it doesn't take up any floor space and it just *feels* like I'm hanging up my clothes on a line, know what I mean?

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#5 of 30 Old 11-29-2011, 07:48 PM
 
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I was just having a conversation with a lady in the bathroom about drying indoors.  Sheesh she gave me a website and everything for a wood drying kit.  I need to find her again because I forgot the website!  I dry my stuff outside even in the winter.  But... I'm in Texas.

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#6 of 30 Old 11-29-2011, 08:05 PM
 
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I have been doing it for years - it works with no problem!

 

for things I want "softer" I use the dryer for only 10 mins and then put them on the drying racks(things like towels or sheets)- I have racks in the bathrooms (one I do not use so it goes right in the tub with the curtain shut and no one sees the stuff) the other I put near a room with some plants (this does add some moisture to the air) the drying takes 24 to 30 hours at 68F for things (jeans a bit longer-giver or take)- I have not had problems with electric heat at all

 

if you do a normal spin cycle on your washer you should have no issue with drips either- just use caution if it is an item that could drip and the color would drip some place


 

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#7 of 30 Old 11-30-2011, 12:51 PM
 
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We lived overseas in Sweden and this was the norm. Everyone line dried everything and most people lived in tiny apartments.  So, laundry in the dining room, laundry in the bathroom, laundry in the kitchen.  

 

We had a wooden drying rack and line dried all year round in the house.  Winter was easy since the heat was on anyway. Summer could get a little muggy, but I had a little yard and would just move the rack out into the sun.  

 

 

Works just fine.  thumb.gif


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#8 of 30 Old 11-30-2011, 03:08 PM
 
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I'm a city apartment dweller, but last week our dyer went out so I thought I'd share.

 

I had twine lines going all over the place in our dining room.  I was still using the washing machine to wash the clothes and spin them dry, and everything was dry within 24hrs (except for towels).   We keep our heat rather low (55 at night, 58 during the day) so I turned it up to 60 during that time in hopes of speeding the drying process.  We have a gas fired boiler that provides us baseboard radiant heat :)


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#9 of 30 Old 11-30-2011, 10:31 PM
 
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We primarily dry inside on racks in the bedroom. Two stand-up racks and this wall rack that pulls out over one of the stand-up racks to hang family cloth, cloth "tissues," my panty liners, those sorts of things. I hang the shirts straight onto hangers and put those on the shower curtain rod to dry. We do throw most loads in the dryer for about 10 minutes to get the lint and cat hair off and because it's rather cool and humid in the bedroom. That 10 minutes helps a LOT in the wettest, coolest months here in Oregon. During the colder times, I used to run the heat in the bedroom while I was hanging the laundry but I don't bother with that now that the loads get that short time in the dryer. Our apartment complex's washers and dryers use less money than any laundromat but there's still no way we could afford to completely dry all the laundry even if I wasn't line drying it to be green.


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#10 of 30 Old 12-08-2011, 07:04 AM
 
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I use something like this: http://www.ikea.com/be/nl/catalog/products/50095091/

When not in use to dry clothes it folds flat and is sometimes even used as "gate" to keep the dog out of certain areas, lol

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#11 of 30 Old 12-08-2011, 10:20 AM
 
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We live in a tiny apartment, and have a portable washer, no dryer. We hang everything to dry. My husband attached strings close to the ceiling, in the living room, dining room and bedroom. We also have a clothes rack, and use the shower rod in the bathroom. It works. Its slow in the winter (in Canada) but it works. I am not looking forward to drying diapers this way in April, and really really hoping when we move, we have access to a dryer. But for our clothes, its fine.

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#12 of 30 Old 12-08-2011, 11:05 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sandravb79 View Post

I use something like this: http://www.ikea.com/be/nl/catalog/products/50095091/

When not in use to dry clothes it folds flat and is sometimes even used as "gate" to keep the dog out of certain areas, lol



I totally want one like that! Just haven't been able to get myself to buy one when we have perfectly functioning racks and there are other things that we need more (like flea drops this month).


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#13 of 30 Old 12-08-2011, 11:19 AM
 
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Thought I'd chime in smile.gif I have a new washer with a max extract spin cycle, so the clothes aren't very wet when they come out. I dry on two permanent lines in our basement (live in northernish Canada, so the air is dry and our basement isn't damp), and a metal indoor/outdoor drying rack smile.gif Works great! A squirrel got into our dryer vent, inside the motor and killed the machine about a year ago, we haven't bothered to replace it. I do want to get a new one before our baby comes, for drying diapers if it's raining, and in the winter smile.gif We'll see though, I really haven't minded line drying.

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#14 of 30 Old 12-08-2011, 04:17 PM
 
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We used a drying rack and it worked well, but when it gets damp (frequent for Nova Scotia, even in winter) I have to watch for things not getting musty.  I don't have electric heat, if I get the wood furnace heat high the dampness isn't as much of a problem.


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#15 of 30 Old 12-15-2011, 04:36 PM
 
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i line dry indoors at times. at my last house i set up some cheapo retractible clothes line from amazon and hung it above the electric heater. i have also used wooden drying racks placed several feet from a wood stove. and my favorite way to dry inside is in the bathroom with a good air vent and heater


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#16 of 30 Old 12-28-2011, 02:37 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank you for all the suggestions :D! We have a fairly large bathroom/washing machine room so I think I could just maybe get DH in on letting me line dry in there! This may sound silly, but do your floors get soaking wet all the time? I'm definitely not afraid of a little bit of water, but don't want an ocean on my floor all the time :P


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#17 of 30 Old 12-28-2011, 10:51 AM
 
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We use a rather large drying rack that our small local hardware store carries. I remember trying to find a good drying rack at Target when we lived near one and they only had really dinky ones.  We can put a whole load of laundry on it at once.  After a few times you get pretty good at knowing what items to put together to maximize your space, what items need to go on the top to stay off the ground, etc. and it goes pretty fast.

We have a really basic top loading washer that is at least 10 or 15 years old, so it doesn't do anything fancy to get the extra dampness out.  I have never seen anything actually drip on the floor.  We heat with wood and in the winter put the rack right over the grate above the furnace before we go to bed and it is dry in the morning.  We actually like that it helps with the dryness in the house.  In the summer it can take at least 24 hrs to dry if not more.  Putting the rack by an open window with a breeze might help some.

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#18 of 30 Old 12-28-2011, 01:19 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erinbethp View Post

We use a rather large drying rack that our small local hardware store carries. I remember trying to find a good drying rack at Target when we lived near one and they only had really dinky ones.  We can put a whole load of laundry on it at once.  After a few times you get pretty good at knowing what items to put together to maximize your space, what items need to go on the top to stay off the ground, etc. and it goes pretty fast.

We have a really basic top loading washer that is at least 10 or 15 years old, so it doesn't do anything fancy to get the extra dampness out.  I have never seen anything actually drip on the floor.  We heat with wood and in the winter put the rack right over the grate above the furnace before we go to bed and it is dry in the morning.  We actually like that it helps with the dryness in the house.  In the summer it can take at least 24 hrs to dry if not more.  Putting the rack by an open window with a breeze might help some.



yeahthat.gif  I've become a pro at working out how best to hang things. (Okay, I admit, my OCD plays into it...) And nope, no dripping at all.


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#19 of 30 Old 12-29-2011, 02:10 PM
 
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I meant to upload some photos of what was drying indoors last time I posted, but the baby got irritable and then it got forgotten.  But here are the photos I took that night:

 

IMG_3196.jpg

Here's a photo of some things hanging on our retractable line.  It hangs too low, so we have a hook put up in the ceiling so it hangs down twice, but not as low (and it doesn't block the door to the living room!).  There's a t-shirt, some sleepers, underwear, breast pads, a diaper cover and socks in the photo.

 

IMG_3197.jpg

 

And here's a bunch of diapers and wipes (along with a fleece liner or two) on the drying rack ($4 at a yard sale!).  Please excuse my awesome 70s vinyl flooring.

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#20 of 30 Old 12-30-2011, 03:14 PM
 
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Since amautik shared her setup I thought I would too.

IMG_2023.JPG
If I'm strategic about it I can hang two loads at once as long as I put the shirts on hangers and hang them from the shower curtain rod. The rack on the wall is for my panty liners and family cloth and our "tissues" and other small such things. Definitely falls into that "one of the best things we ever bought" category. You can get it on Amazon.


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#21 of 30 Old 01-01-2012, 11:53 AM
 
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Ooh, I like your drying racks!  When DH and I were talking about getting one, he pictured one like the one I have, and I pictured one like yours!  Then I found ours at the yard sale, so his idea won out.

 

I like the one hanging on the wall too.  I have a lot of similar small items like yours, and it would be nice to have a designated spot for them.

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#22 of 30 Old 01-01-2012, 12:29 PM
 
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I'm in Utah where it's too cold to line dry from November to March-ish. I use a drying rack for towels and diapers. For clothes, I take a big stack of hangers with me to the laundry room and put everything on there then hang those up on the shower curtain rod in the bathroom. If I'm doing a couple of loads in a day and the first set of clothes isn't dry yet, I'll save any leftover small items from the first load (undies, socks) and dry those with the second load. So instead of having to run the dryer twice, I'm only running it once.

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#23 of 30 Old 01-02-2012, 05:47 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amautik View Post

Ooh, I like your drying racks!  When DH and I were talking about getting one, he pictured one like the one I have, and I pictured one like yours!  Then I found ours at the yard sale, so his idea won out.

 

I like the one hanging on the wall too.  I have a lot of similar small items like yours, and it would be nice to have a designated spot for them.


Our apartment complex has a community building with a give-away table and we got both of our standing racks that way. The white one is metal with plastic over the bars and is super sturdy, I love it. The cost of the wall rack made up for the free ones (but totally worth it). LOL

 


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#24 of 30 Old 01-03-2012, 04:05 PM
 
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We always dry all of our small stuff (socks, undies, etc) inside rain or shine just because it's more convenient not to have to use clothes pins on all that little stuff.  Nothing ever drips on the floor unless I've hand washed it and then I hang it in the shower until it's done dripping.  We also dry our larger things outside in the winter with no problem.  Even if the clothes freeze they still dry through a phenomenon called sublimation.  Ever notice how a thin layer of snow will disappear even if it never gets above freezing? That's sublimation.  It does take a little longer, so if you don't want them out overnight hang them inside.  

 

One tip we've learned for drying thick fitted diapers faster inside is to put a fan on them on low.  It does take a little electricity, but WAY less than a dryer, and in damp or humid weather our thickest diapers would take almost 48 hours to dry without the fan.


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#25 of 30 Old 01-05-2012, 04:24 PM
 
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How does everyone dry sheets and blankets?  I used to hang them over the bedroom doors, but I would run out of doors, it dripped on my hardwood floors and I got tired of never being able to close the doors.


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#26 of 30 Old 01-06-2012, 12:46 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paigekitten View Post

How does everyone dry sheets and blankets?  I used to hang them over the bedroom doors, but I would run out of doors, it dripped on my hardwood floors and I got tired of never being able to close the doors.


A twin-size sheet will fit over one of our racks just right. I often fold a blanket in half so I can drape it over a rack. Throw sheet or blanket over the shower curtain rod (would work with a fixed shower enclosure as well). We definitely toss them over doors but they're two doors we don't close much. I've been known to drape bedding over the couch or such. Bedding is one thing we tend to finish in the dryer more than anything else but I try not to. The washers in our complex wring things out well enough that there are no drips.

 


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#27 of 30 Old 01-06-2012, 03:32 PM
 
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Good timing on this post, I just sat down from hanging a load of washing! I line dry indoors all winter. I use one of those Ikea racks that someone posted a link to. One rack fits one machine load of laundry. The only thing about indoor drying is that I have room for only one rack, so I have to keep up with the laundry and do one load/day, otherwise we are overwhelmed with damp clothes. We have very dry air here, so things dry fast. 

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#28 of 30 Old 01-10-2012, 08:57 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sandravb79 View Post

I use something like this: http://www.ikea.com/be/nl/catalog/products/50095091/

When not in use to dry clothes it folds flat and is sometimes even used as "gate" to keep the dog out of certain areas, lol



I have this one and I love it. I can usually fit a whole load of laundry on it. In the summer I use it outside and lay my CDs on the top to sun bleach them.  We use it indoors over a hot air register and put the towels and sheets in the dryer for 10mins to soften up.  Dress shirts get put on hangars wet and hung up so we don't have to iron.


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#29 of 30 Old 01-10-2012, 10:05 AM
 
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I actually dry a lot of clothes in my Garage.  I have three lines in there.  We have a lot of nice days in the winter so I take advantage of a warm day and do all the sheets and such on those days they get hung up outside then. 

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#30 of 30 Old 01-11-2012, 05:11 PM
 
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I haven't been air drying laundry indoors this year. We just moved to a new house and we have humidity issues, but I line dried everything until about october. For socks and little things like undies I use something like this .... http://www.amazon.com/Honey-Can-Do-Clothes-Drying-Hanger-Chrome/dp/B002M3SP3W/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1326330391&sr=8-1    Mine is plastic, but I love that thing. I usually match the socks when I'm hanging them too.


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