looking for a quality clothes drying line -- advice? - Mothering Forums

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Old 03-06-2014, 07:23 PM - Thread Starter
 
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this could go under frugality or environmental, but figured people living off grid are for sure doing this -- i am looking for advice on where to find the very best clothes drying line. and any other advice about using one. such as clothes pins, are there a better type?

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Old 03-08-2014, 09:55 AM
 
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we made our own


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Old 03-08-2014, 10:05 AM
 
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I use the plastic-coated wire, plus an extra-large wooden rack for small items.  The wire doesn't stretch out, no matter how heavy the load.  

 

I have both spring-type pins and peg pins.  The pegs last forever, but are not as ideal as the spring-type clips, and they leave stretch spots on the cotton knits.  I bring my pins in after every use because the rot if left out.  In general, I prefer the clips.

 

Drying tip: since a lot of our clothes are that jersey-knit fabric, I find that lowering the spin speed and actually putting those items out wetter allows the fabric to stay resilient and even for other fabrics, I find my clothes and towles are softer when they are not spun nearly dry, though it makes drying time longer.

 

ETA:  If you go with the pegs, make sure you get the ones actually made for line drying laundry.  It seems like most are shaped more for crafts, and they are rough and not as easy to use.


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Old 04-12-2014, 03:27 PM
 
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May be an odd one but I SWEAR by a dog tie out cable. It is thick and coated so even the thinnest material stays on snuggly.  I bought a pretty heavy duty line so it is thick.  Doe not look like a dog tie out until you are right in front of it.  I have had shirts stay over night on stormy nights and they have not come loose.

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Old 04-12-2014, 06:50 PM
 
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oooo!  Thanks for starting this thread!

 

I am also curious what people's experience is with lines on a pulley system vs. long single fixed line vs. umbrella style multiple lines, etc.

 

I have used fixed lines and umbrella style lines.  I like that I can stand in one spot with my umbrella dryer, but I don't like the PVC line.  Not only is it PVC, but it stretches and I am constantly having to tighten it.

 

Thanks for the tips on letting clothes be a little more damp.

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Old 04-15-2014, 01:39 PM
 
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I use a fixed line as the backyard has to many pine trees that drip and only place to hang the line a pulley would not work well as it would have to be shorter or drag on the center post.  I really would not do pulley unless we had a porch that I could send things out on and then the advantage would be dog can not brush against clothes!    I like put things in certain spot and going out and getting a few items that are done and leaving the heavier stuff and a pulley would defeat the ease unless I left things all out longer.

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Old 04-15-2014, 07:52 PM
 
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I love my clothesline.  I live in the PNW, so it rains enough here I can't use it all the time though.  We sunk a permanent 4 by 4 post in the yard and installed a six line system that ends at the house.  Our goal was big, sturdy, and long-lasting and so far so good!  When our family was smaller, we could get away with one line strung between trees, but it sagged in the middle.  When our family was middle-sized, we used the umbrella spinner from the box store.  They only lasted one year because of winds or bending under the weight of too many towels or massively tangled lines after a winter of storage.  Building our own was the best solution for us.

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Old 04-19-2014, 07:41 PM
 
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If you want to buy something premade, try Lehmans. They have a ton of stuff aimed at homesteaders. 


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Old 04-20-2014, 03:31 PM
 
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I don't know what clothes pins are out there, but I can certainly recommend bailing twine for an unbeatable and very cheap clothes line. There are I'd have thought, 101 uses for the rot-proof stuff. Eh, when the belt went on my work trousers, this twine came in very handy. xD

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Old 04-20-2014, 05:57 PM
 
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I don't know what clothes pins are out there, but I can certainly recommend bailing twine for an unbeatable and very cheap clothes line. There are I'd have thought, 101 uses for the rot-proof stuff. Eh, when the belt went on my work trousers, this twine came in very handy. xD

I'm trying to collect enough to do a coiled basket, but it keeps getting used!  I also thought I'd make a fun wreath out of hay and bailing twine for the chicken coop for Christmas.


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Old 04-20-2014, 06:05 PM
 
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I'm trying to collect enough to do a coiled basket, but it keeps getting used!  I also thought I'd make a fun wreath out of hay and bailing twine for the chicken coop for Christmas.

 

Awwwe, if you'd have lived nearer I could have given you 25 kilos of it! The amount we get through at hay and straw bailing time is phenominal! A hay or straw wreath is great fun. :)

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Old 04-20-2014, 07:52 PM
 
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I only use about 15 bales of hay per year, so it doesn't amount to much.


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