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#121 of 158 Old 02-26-2008, 09:36 PM
 
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Thanks for sharing! What a find!

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#122 of 158 Old 02-27-2008, 12:04 PM
 
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We bought a 30' yurt from Colorado Yurt Company back in 2006, with the intention of putting it up on our land the following summer, but were delayed by a property boundary problem with our land, which is an old mining claim and backs up to National Forest. Now, we have had the land surveyed, are sure of where the boundaries are, and hope to get started with the yurt this summer. Our land is above 10,000 ft. elevation, so we have to wait for some of the snow to melt out before we can begin.

A question for YurtDwellingMama: You said you installed the full insulation package on your yurt. Did yours come with the mylar-faced bubble wrap type insulation as ours did, or did you add something more? Because of the amount of snow our land gets, we will be installing the vertical wall studs (2 by 6), and had thought of putting insulation batts between the studs, then adding wood siding on theinside. This would hide the lattice, though, and may be unnecessary, because I doubt we will see colder temps than you have, there in MN.
It's great to learn of others living in yurts! I've really enjoyed reading this thread, and thanks for sharing the photos, YurtDwellingMama!
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#123 of 158 Old 02-27-2008, 04:59 PM
 
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Yay, More yurt people! No one around here seems to know what they are. They think we are absolutely crazy for wanting one. I can barely wait to get ours up.

Vegan Crunchy Tree Hugging Wife to my DH and Mommy to my sweet Daughter
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#124 of 158 Old 02-28-2008, 12:01 AM
 
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okay, a yurt of my own in the wilds of alaska: is something I dream about every night- I am that I found this thread!

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#125 of 158 Old 02-28-2008, 04:12 AM
 
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We have a 24 ft yurt in Northern California with full insultation (the mylar bubble kind) and it gets cold. We don't have a full stove, just a couple of space heaters (we don't live there except during the summer, which is relatively cold at night). Our foundation is just raised peer blocks, a plywood subfloor and cork tile. More insultation there might help. The worst part is that because the manufacturer is sub par the interior lining doesn't come close to covering the insulation so instead of having a peaceful environment I live in a drapey jiffy pop.

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#126 of 158 Old 02-29-2008, 03:59 PM
 
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I hate to dwell on this because I know it's been asked, but what about bears? does anyone live in a yurt in a bear area? do you think they could rip through the liner, and how strong is the framing? Last year we had bears breaking into people's garages and raiding their freezers and garbage in our area. So I am thinking I can't have a yurt here.
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#127 of 158 Old 02-29-2008, 08:49 PM
 
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I know several people living in yurts here in the CO Rockies (definitely bear country) and the consensus seems to be that the best way to deter bears is to run an electric fence around the perimiter of your porch. One person has one of those solar electric fences commonly used by ranchers, which uses a small solar panel to keep a battery charged, so the fence continues to function on cloudy days and at night.
Have heard of one instance where a bear tried to break into a yurt, and he couldn't get through the lattice, but the outer fabric and insulation needed some repairs!
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#128 of 158 Old 02-29-2008, 11:35 PM
 
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Originally Posted by francesca'smom View Post
I hate to dwell on this because I know it's been asked, but what about bears? does anyone live in a yurt in a bear area? do you think they could rip through the liner, and how strong is the framing? Last year we had bears breaking into people's garages and raiding their freezers and garbage in our area. So I am thinking I can't have a yurt here.
I found this at yurtinfo.org:

"Are yurts bear proof?
Yes and no. I've heard stories about bears in Alaska trying to break into yurts without success. But there's a bear in central Idaho that managed to break into a back country (unoccupied) yurt; in fact this bear comes through at the same time every Spring and the owner leaves the door open and cleans up after the bear, rather than risk more damage to the yurt.

If you live in bear country it's a good idea to build your deck up high (preferably high enough to put a full story underneath for storage, and close it in with walls or skirting for warmth). A north Idaho couple used this tactic and feel it helped avoid problems with the numerous bears on their property."

We are considering a yurt in-law. I'm very excited about it but worried about the bears, too.

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#129 of 158 Old 02-29-2008, 11:36 PM
 
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Thanks ElkMtnsMama! so the lattice is stronger than I was thinking, but the electric fence makes a lot of sense.
They may choose to stay up higher this year (more snow this year=more wild food) but we may have to get electric fences to preserve our fruit trees.
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#130 of 158 Old 02-29-2008, 11:48 PM
 
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Originally Posted by lunabelly View Post
I found this at yurtinfo.org:

"Are yurts bear proof?
Yes and no. I've heard stories about bears in Alaska trying to break into yurts without success. But there's a bear in central Idaho that managed to break into a back country (unoccupied) yurt; in fact this bear comes through at the same time every Spring and the owner leaves the door open and cleans up after the bear, rather than risk more damage to the yurt.

If you live in bear country it's a good idea to build your deck up high (preferably high enough to put a full story underneath for storage, and close it in with walls or skirting for warmth). A north Idaho couple used this tactic and feel it helped avoid problems with the numerous bears on their property."

We are considering a yurt in-law. I'm very excited about it but worried about the bears, too.
Thanks lunabelly. I'm feeling a little more encouraged about the possibility.
That's an interesting idea about building a second story underneath. I've seen them climb trees and go over a wood fence REALLY fast, but never an actual wall.
As far as leaving it opn, it would be scary to come to your unoccupied yurt not really knowing if the bear was in there. We've had bears sleeping in unfinished construction sites around here.
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#131 of 158 Old 03-02-2008, 02:18 PM
 
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Has anyone had to deal with building codes and yurts? Like, septic and water, etc. required even though you want a compost toilet, etc.?

ANd the Pacific yurt has the water catchement system. Can you use that with some sort of plumbing or does it just "catch" it. How would that work out?

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#132 of 158 Old 03-02-2008, 10:52 PM
 
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This yurt stuff looks a lot like the round house I saw in the Greenfield Museum near detroit mi. If you are near there, this house is really cool.

We just bought land and a travel trailor. Living off the grid there, although, for us its just for fun. We live on the grid throughout the week near Lansing.
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#133 of 158 Old 03-23-2008, 10:41 AM
 
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I havent posted on here for a while been busy, this last month and alot has changed. I have been offered a job on the west coast that I cant refuse, which means I will have to put my yurt living off for some time. So I will be selling my 30 pacific yurt. It is older but still in good shape, has the ceiling insulation, wall insulation and wind and snow kit. I am selling it for $8000 so if anyone is interested they can reach me at sheasegelstrom@gmail.com The price includes new window covers, a new door, and new dome skylight I have ordered. It is disappointing for me yet exciting since oregon is very beautiful and mn is cold!: Send me and email if interested! Thanks
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#134 of 158 Old 03-23-2008, 11:09 PM
 
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We had a bear rip into our Pacific Yurt but he couldn't get through due to the lattice, studs, insulation, and whatever else. He just ripped the canvas a bit and it still held tight, no leaks or wind problems.

Our yurt was donated because the community we lived in had a major forest fire and Pacific Yurts donated some domes and yurts. I used to think I wanted a dome but was so glad I got the yurt. We had to have a constant fire at 8,600 ft in the winter but is was easy enough with a good stove.
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#135 of 158 Old 03-25-2008, 11:17 PM
 
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I loved reading this thread. DH and I live in town in an older home and I dream of living in a yurt someday soon. I appreciate all of the info and links
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#136 of 158 Old 10-25-2008, 11:35 PM
 
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Hi Guys,

I previously owned a 30' Pacific Yurt but had to sell it due to financial pressures. It was going to go up on my 50 acre rural property. I did not yet have the septic system dealt with that should be completed this january. Bought the property in sep 07.

I was bummed to say the least having to sell it, but I learned a lot about these in terms of how they are put together, how well insulated they are, how they hold up. I'll share that experience here with you all.

I paid about $10k for it and needed the money to pay bills and taxes. So off it was sold to someone who really needed it and was going through a divorce and owned a piece of land. I am glad it worked out for her. The yurt will work good with a wood stove, but feels like a tent.

Recently, I found a really nice older 24' yurt pacific for $2 grand. It did not have the insulation kit but will work well for camping and transition living on the property. It included the deck and is about 10 years old. Could not pass up at this price. I really want to panelize the interior with real insulation down the road.

I have been very fortunate as I have found the following:

A really nice 12x36' metal horse barn with two stalls. Going to frame this in and make it part of the living area outside of the yurt. Retail: $6k, bought for $2k in a liquidation.

5200 watts worth of used solar panels for off-grid use. Cost: $10k, retail about $25k. PG&E is 800' away, will hook up eventually but cost is about $15-20k. Going to mount solar panels to the roof of the barn and also extend the barn to be 36x24 or 36x36.

A 33' 1999 travel trailer with two bedrooms, propane fridge, 24' awning for $4k.

An original 1975 New in the box Meyers well pump above ground 1/2 HP jetted well pump that will do 4-5GPM at 90-100'. $30 craigslist. New is $350.

The yurt is the item completing the ability to truly get rid of the mortgage at some point and live on the land. We've camped in the trailer and we're sick of it after a day. Too narrow and I can't have a real size bed in the trailer; this means I am exhausted the following day, back is killing me, etc.


Water table is 60'.
I also have a spring that is supposed to be year round that is 1800' away.
Drilling a well: $8400 @ 200'. OUCH! An original windmill existed on the site where the spring is located.

So, just need the septic installed and I can live out there. It is going to be quite the challenge as we have 3 kids (6,4,2) ages. I definitely think that the yurt will be expanded to as we can afford it shortly. Eventually going to build a nice 2500 sq foot house on the property in a few years when things are better in the economy and financially. If nothing else, this will be a great experience not only for me but for my children, as they will learn to live with less gadgets and less television, but will have a nice playground that's already out there in the country. We will then have finances to continue to improve both our living situation and the property on a monthly basis versus burning that money in interest.

I hope more of you are willing to take this step. I am about there and I hope this is really worth it. Come this spring, a move from my primary residence will be possible. I seriously think a yurt is substantially better long term and financially than a single wide or double wide trailer. Just the permit costs for a manufactured home here are more than a new 30' yurt.

Brock
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#137 of 158 Old 10-26-2008, 12:44 AM
 
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: Subbing... I'm pretty sure any question I was going to ask has already been answered in this thread, so I'll have to come back to read through!

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#138 of 158 Old 10-27-2008, 07:50 PM
 
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We have decided to build a soild wall yurt since I last wrote. I thought I would add with us doing all the work it came out to the same price as fabric.

Vegan Crunchy Tree Hugging Wife to my DH and Mommy to my sweet Daughter
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#139 of 158 Old 11-07-2008, 02:58 AM
 
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I have had Yurt-lust for a couple of years now and my DH is finally on board! His parents are going to be buying about 5-10acres a bit out of the city in the next 12-18months and their plan was to build a prefab 'kit' home and then put a smaller granny flat next to it. Once the granny flat was complete they'd move into it, we'd take over the larger house (and it's taxes/rates etc). All this was going to be at their expense using the money they're making off the sale of their current home but I HATED the idea of them spending 60k of that on a house that we were going to live in

So after much drooling and oohing & ahhing over yurt info, pics, and finding a sales company here (they import US yurts apparently) I have convinced him that a yurt is a better way to go! We have 3small boys and I want to think I'm not crazy? (they are 6.5, 4.5 & 2.5). They share a room already so that wouldn't be a problem for them In the beginning I'm thinking a 30footer would do ok for kitchen/living/sleep space and plan to have a sleep loft (probably for me & dh since I cannot trust the kids to not pitch each other off in a moment of agitation lol) I'd possibly get dad to help us build a small attached bathroom. After a year or so of saving what would be our rent money, we could buy a second yurt and attach using part of the bathroom as a hallway (I have this planned out in my head honest lol) All we have to do is work out the electric, plumbing etc with FIL.

SOOooo, AM I crazy? Have I lost my mind? lol

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#140 of 158 Old 11-07-2008, 01:59 PM
 
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Hey, your plan is exactly what we had planned with connected yurts and a separate bathhouse, sans electricity though. It sounds great. If finances and schooling weren't a problem for us we would be doing the exact same thing right now.
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#141 of 158 Old 11-07-2008, 02:03 PM
 
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: Hoping to put up a yurt this summer! Needing some tips for off grid living..namely cooking/baking..any wonderful ideas? anyone have an outdoor oven? also, what are the best options for snowy weather/harsher climates?

Blissful Mama to DD-(5), DS-(6) and someone new due in November!
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#142 of 158 Old 11-07-2008, 02:10 PM
 
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Well, I will say in my research that colder climates are supposed to be better suited for yurts than warmer, humid ones. I live in Florida. I've heard over and over that yurts heat up nicely with a woodstove. Of course you will want to pay for the insulation package as well but I think you would be nice and toasty. I've heard over and over that yurts are much harder to cool than to heat, so summer is the bigger problem.
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#143 of 158 Old 11-07-2008, 02:14 PM
 
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my honey lived in a couple yurts for several years here in New England and says it's cooold...what pkg. or brand would be best? what about used yurts or building your own (ie;not from a kit) it can't be that difficult, no? also what about stoves? I am interested in pellet stoves..would that be possible to use in a yurt then moved to a permanent home later on? (like 5-10 years down the road)

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#144 of 158 Old 11-07-2008, 02:21 PM
 
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Okay, a couple of things. I looked at a lot of different yurt companies as well as reviews. Pacific Yurts is the oldest and seems to be the most reputable. I stayed in one of their yurts and have never heard a bad thing about them...but I have heard some not so good things about a few competitors.

As for building one, I know it can be done and I find it pretty fascinating...I just don't know if I would trust myself to do it the right way so I would rather buy one that I know is made to perfection so to speak. To each their own though, you know? I think if I were building a wood and concrete type of one I would feel better about it but I don't know about a canvas or wool one. I would be worried about mildew, bugs, weatherizing, and so on.

I don't know much about pellet stoves. I need to look into those. I do know that I've heard of mildew problems from stoves in some of the handmade yurts, particularly the wool ones.
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#145 of 158 Old 11-08-2008, 06:41 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pixiewytch View Post
Well, I will say in my research that colder climates are supposed to be better suited for yurts than warmer, humid ones. I live in Florida. I've heard over and over that yurts heat up nicely with a woodstove. Of course you will want to pay for the insulation package as well but I think you would be nice and toasty. I've heard over and over that yurts are much harder to cool than to heat, so summer is the bigger problem.
Well that just bites. Maybe I'll have to go back to the drawing board after all.. because I live in Queensland australia, the home of all humidity (really, if y'all have humidity where you are, it has just gone on holiday from HERE . I am rethinking accepting the parents offer (as we all get along FAB and MIL is offering to take care of the kids so that I can go to Uni when I'm ready, even if we are still homeschooling) and just not saying anything until the end.. then paying them 'rent' whether they like it or not We have actually discussed this a great deal and we SO want to move out to the country (we won't be off grid though.. I'm just not ready for that yet ) and I would be ecstatic to have land & a big garden, and chickens!

Pagan  lovin'  WOW playing mum to 5 boys in the wonderful land of Oz ... FOR THE HORDE! hehehe
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#146 of 158 Old 11-14-2008, 07:35 AM
 
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Pixiewitch, mildew doesn't come from stove heat. At least not wood stoves. Wood fires are drying. Although I have never had a pellet stove, I cannot imagine a pellet stove being any different from a wood stove and it not be drying. Dry heat kills mildew.

Rainbowmoon, my husband and I built our yurt. I can talk to you about the experience if you want. Also, small wood stoves are moveable. Our wood stove has moved with us from our house, to our yurt, and now back into our house.

: madrone - : SAHM to 12 y.o. DS, : 9 y.o. DD, and : 4 y.o. DS
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#147 of 158 Old 11-14-2008, 03:02 PM
 
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Well, it wasn't my experience. It was somebody on this forum, maybe even this thread who had mentioned mildew inside from cooking. I am fairly sure it was a wool yurt though.
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#148 of 158 Old 11-14-2008, 03:06 PM
 
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Pixiewitch, mildew doesn't come from stove heat. At least not wood stoves. Wood fires are drying. Although I have never had a pellet stove, I cannot imagine a pellet stove being any different from a wood stove and it not be drying. Dry heat kills mildew.

Rainbowmoon, my husband and I built our yurt. I can talk to you about the experience if you want. Also, small wood stoves are moveable. Our wood stove has moved with us from our house, to our yurt, and now back into our house.
did you design your yurt yourselves or purchase plans somewhere? I would LOVE to hear more about your experiences! what part of the country are you in?

Blissful Mama to DD-(5), DS-(6) and someone new due in November!
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#149 of 158 Old 11-14-2008, 07:06 PM
 
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It was me who mentioned mildew problems on yurts. I live in a very humid, coastal area of the world and mildew growth is a problem everywhere here. It's a bigger problem in our house than in our yurt. Our house is stone. Wool doesn't really get growth on it. It rots when it's too humid. Mildew will grow on cotton. To not have mildew grow, you need to cut down the humidity. In houses, de-humidifiers are very popular here. But they use electricity. And it's not something really feasible in a yurt.

Wood heat dries and helps get rid of humidity. Cooking creates humidity and attributes to mildew. That's because of the evaporation of water during cooking. If you just have wood heat without a kettle boiling on it, it does help dry the environment. Our yurt is wool and cotton. The yurts of different friends of ours are wool with a cotton/poly blend. Wool tends to rot and not mildew. Cotton mildews. Polyester isn't breathable, so I think it attributes to rot and mildew problems in some of our friends' yurts. We were in a very dry climate last year and cooked inside all year. But that was a much different environment. Where we live is wet pretty much year round. In the summer, you don't want to build a fire. So you cook on gas, which is a moist heat. And between the gas moisture and the cooking moisture, you create a problem for yourself. Not all wood heating stoves are good to cook on, even when you are using it for heat. Our first wood stove was horrible to cook on. Our current wood stove is better, but it's not like you can sauté something on it. We still need a cook stove. So that's gas and that creates humidity. In a dry environment, it's fine to cook in our yurt. But here no.

Rainbowmoon, we have Paul King's Yurt Handbook and used that as the basis for our yurt. We didn't follow his instructions exactly, but reading his book helped us understood the concepts. I know I wrote about it as we were doing it here. Perhaps it's in the early pages of this thread? We're not in the states but in Europe.

: madrone - : SAHM to 12 y.o. DS, : 9 y.o. DD, and : 4 y.o. DS
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#150 of 158 Old 11-15-2008, 03:26 PM
 
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Just wanted to add that building a soild wall yurt yourself is cheaper than buy one from Pacific. Thats what really made us decide to build. Good luck

Vegan Crunchy Tree Hugging Wife to my DH and Mommy to my sweet Daughter
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