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#1 of 53 Old 06-05-2009, 07:23 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I didn't want to derail the other thread, but I'm hoping someone can shed light on how having sexual and romantic feelings for your therapist is helpful.

I don't quite "get it."
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#2 of 53 Old 06-05-2009, 08:44 PM
 
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It's not.

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#3 of 53 Old 06-05-2009, 09:18 PM
 
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What do you mean by 'helpful'? Feelings just are---neither good nor bad.

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#4 of 53 Old 06-05-2009, 10:06 PM
 
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The following is directly taken from the Wikipedia article on "Transference."

In a therapy context, transference refers to redirection of a client's feelings from a significant person to the therapist. Transference is often manifested as an erotic attraction towards a therapist, but can be seen in many other forms such as rage, hatred, mistrust, parentification, extreme dependence, or even placing the therapist in a god-like or guru status. When Freud initially encountered transference in his therapy with clients, he felt it was an obstacle to treatment success. But what he learned was that the analysis of the transference was actually the work that needed to be done. The focus in psychodynamic psychotherapy is, in large part, the therapist and client recognizing the transference relationship and exploring what the meaning of the relationship is. Because the transference between patient and therapist happens on an unconscious level, psychodynamic therapists who are largely concerned with a patient's unconscious material use the transference to reveal unresolved conflicts patients have with figures from their childhoods.

Countertransference[5] is defined as redirection of a therapist's feelings toward a client, or more generally as a therapist's emotional entanglement with a client. A therapist's attunement to his own countertransference is nearly as critical as his understanding of the transference. Not only does this help the therapist regulate his/her own emotions in the therapeutic relationship, but it also gives the therapist valuable insight into what the client is attempting to elicit in them. For example, if a therapist feels a very strong sexual attraction to a patient, he or she must understand this as countertransference and look at how the client is attempting to elicit this reaction in him or her. Once it has been identified, the therapist can ask the client what her feelings are toward the therapist and examine the feelings the client has and how they relate to unconscious motivations, desires, or fears.

Another contrasting perspective on transference and counter-transference is offered in Classical Adlerian psychotherapy. Rather than using the client's transference strategically in therapy, the positive or negative transference is diplomatically pointed out and explained as an obstacle to cooperation and improvement. For the therapist, any signs of counter-transference would suggest that his own personal training analysis needed to be continued to overcome these tendencies.


So my hunch was correct about that being a helpful thing, but only if the therapist understands and practices Freudian-based therapy. So the therapist is supposed to analyze the attraction and try to get to the root of who the patient is replacing him/her with and try to understand why the patient is creating that relationship; what past relationship are they trying to recreate? Father, Mother, Sibling, Spouse, etc. Of course, you'd have to buy in to all of Freud's hypotheses... but that's another thread I suppose!
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#5 of 53 Old 06-05-2009, 10:34 PM
 
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Originally Posted by fek&fuzz View Post
I didn't want to derail the other thread, but I'm hoping someone can shed light on how having sexual and romantic feelings for your therapist is helpful.

I don't quite "get it."
It isn't so much that sexual or romantic feelings specifically are helpful in therapy. It is that whatever feelings a client develops for their therapist can be helpful to the therapy. It is the feelings and what they mean that matter, not at all that they need to be acted upon or taken literally.
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#6 of 53 Old 06-05-2009, 10:53 PM
 
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It isn't so much that sexual or romantic feelings specifically are helpful in therapy. It is that whatever feelings a client develops for their therapist can be helpful to the therapy. It is the feelings and what they mean that matter, not at all that they need to be acted upon or taken literally.
See, I never got past that point, I just fled the scene when the strong feelings arose. But then later I was able to reprocess some of those feelings to try to understand why I felt that way. I feel like it's a lifelong process in some ways. Like, are we ever "done" processing our childhood relationships? I feel like I am heavily processing a lot of that right now, but also our family and my parents just bought a house together (after having lived together in a smaller house for a year) so I am not surprised to be heavily processing stuff as my mind runs through the first thirty years of my life and projects the next thirty years, which will include my children growing up and my parents dying in this house (again a whole 'nother thread! ).
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#8 of 53 Old 06-06-2009, 12:16 AM
 
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Psychiatry is a profession.

Say your married. As you’ve learned by now, marriage 'aint easy. It’s work.

One day you set yourself on fire. The Fireman who puts out your fire becomes your hero. Sexy.

a) You keep it professional. It's the Fireman's job to put out fires. You're glad he's there to help & feel thankful. He’s nice eye-candy. Probably have some fantasies later - buy husband a Fire Hat.

b) You become flirtatious. You want to see him again, so you set yourself on fire just so he can put it out. Your fantasies of him distance you further from your husband. You think the fireman only puts out your fires or puts them out in a special way that could lead to possibilities... so you continue to set yourself on fire.

Helpful?

I think it’s pretty hilarious that all these Freud/psychoanalysis ideas are being thrown around. I’m speaking from the heart when I say I mean absolutely no offense to anyone, but seriously. How Victorian

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#9 of 53 Old 06-06-2009, 12:33 AM
 
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... Like, are we ever "done" processing our childhood relationships? I feel like I am heavily processing a lot of that right now, but also our family and my parents just bought a house together (after having lived together in a smaller house for a year) so I am not surprised to be heavily processing stuff as my mind runs through the first thirty years of my life and projects the next thirty years, which will include my children growing up and my parents dying in this house (again a whole 'nother thread! ).
I stuck with therapy for a long, long time. For me, I am really way done processing my childhood, relationships, and a whole lot of other stuff. I exist. New things do come up, some not so joyful, but I can pull out the "tools" I acquired. I knew about transference before I began therapy. I can't say I understood it fully or thought much about the meaning of it until now. I did develop a very good relationship with my pdoc from the circumstance of time spent there and getting it all out by examining every crevice of my life and mind. I wanted to understand me and others; to improve my thinking and my life. I was really into the significance of dreams for a time and came to learn to interpret mine and use the meaning. My pdoc was darn good at interpretation, which was a huge bonus. That helped me a lot. I'd say we had an excellent doctor-patient relationship. For me, I know where the line in the sand is drawn about transference and counter transference.

Not to derail this thread, houses have great meaning in one's dreams. I'm not at all surprised that you are processing stuff now.

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#10 of 53 Old 06-06-2009, 12:52 AM
 
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Originally posted by Carley ...I think it’s pretty hilarious that all these Freud/psychoanalysis ideas are being thrown around. I’m speaking from the heart when I say I mean absolutely no offense to anyone, but seriously. How Victorian
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Jungian myself. Freud was too anal for me!

My pdoc explained to me that he (and most) draw on several modalities to treat a patient, that is, unless one strictly seeks out a Freudian pdoc (and I wonder if there are many of them around). He also explained that therapists go to therapists.

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#11 of 53 Old 06-06-2009, 09:37 AM
 
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So has anyone seen the show In Treatment? (I discovered it while googling "transference". ) I thought it was really odd how all of Paul's patients were so rude to him, always picking fights, getting offended at everything he said, etc. So is this what is going on? They are all engaged in transference?

For all the theorizing about transference, explanations like the one above tend to overlook the fact that unrequited love is painful. (Erotic) transference may be therapeutic or "helpful" in some way, but it still hurts like hell.
I don't want to go into too much depth here, but what you feel really isn't about your therapist at all. This is why it is crucial for clients/patients to discuss their feelings with the therapist. It is the therapist's responsibility to help you figure out what and why you are feeling the way you do.
As a general note, transference doesn't simply involve sexual or romantic feelings; it refers to all the feelings a client has toward a therapist, ie anger, jealousy, hatred, abandonment, etc.

With regard to the firefighter analogy, the relationship is fundamentally different. Your house gets on fire and you call the firefighter. They come, your fire gets put out, you are eternally thankful. You both go your separate ways--end of relationship.
With a therapist, you share your most intimate, sometimes dark secrets with this person. There is an unbelievable depth of trust that comes from this relationship. The clients returns week after week to meet with a person who is (in most cases), warm, nonjudgmental, listens and accepts you unconditionally. It is very reminiscent of the parent-child relationship. Depending on your earlier childhood relationships, you are likely to develop feelings of some sort. It's neither good or bad--simply the result of this type of relationship. The therapist is absolutely responsible for managing this process and should NEVER cross the line or indicate that it is ever a possibility.

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#12 of 53 Old 06-06-2009, 10:38 AM
 
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...With regard to the firefighter analogy, the relationship is fundamentally different. Your house gets on fire and you call the firefighter. They come, your fire gets put out, you are eternally thankful. You both go your separate ways--end of relationship. ....
I humbly disagree. As it was presented, the fire/firefighter analogy illustrates what can happen when one chooses NOT to go separate ways. Choice is an option and choices have consequences. Others are involved.

Can we return to the original post on the other thread now?

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#13 of 53 Old 06-06-2009, 12:26 PM
 
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Psychiatry is a profession.

I think it’s pretty hilarious that all these Freud/psychoanalysis ideas are being thrown around. I’m speaking from the heart when I say I mean absolutely no offense to anyone, but seriously. How Victorian
I agree. And I must add that Universities do not teach Freudian psychoanalysis anymore. Most younger psychologist only know about Freud from their first year where you learn about the history of psychology. And therefore you can not expect a psychologist or psychiatrist to deal with "transference" in a psychoanalytic fashion. They are not trained to do so.

It's very normal to have "warm" feelings for the therapist but to make those feelings romantic is a bad idea and it does not enhance treatment. On the contrary.
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#14 of 53 Old 06-06-2009, 01:39 PM
 
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#15 of 53 Old 06-06-2009, 02:01 PM
 
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I humbly disagree. As it was presented, the fire/firefighter analogy illustrates what can happen when one chooses NOT to go separate ways. Choice is an option and choices have consequences. Others are involved.

Can we return to the original post on the other thread now?
Are you in the mental health field? Just curious?




I find it curious that people want to deny normal feelings and human experiences. Feelings toward someone does not equate to action. Additionally, you don't have to be freudian trained to understand transference. I certainly was not freudian trained at all, quite the contrary in fact. However, as a therapist, you must understand human emotions and how they play into the therapeutic process.

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#16 of 53 Old 06-06-2009, 02:11 PM
 
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And how do you propose patients do this? If I could "make" myself feel certain emotions and delete others, if I had that kind of control over my feelings, I wouldn't need therapy!

I completely agree. I would never suggest that a client deny any feelings. Feelings don't necessarily lead to action and that is where choice comes into play. We can exercise control over our feelings, but I don't encourage anyone to deny normal experiences. Talking about and acknowledging feelings helps one to make better and healthier choices.

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#17 of 53 Old 06-06-2009, 03:34 PM
 
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I completely agree. I would never suggest that a client deny any feelings. Feelings don't necessarily lead to action and that is where choice comes into play. We can exercise control over our feelings, but I don't encourage anyone to deny normal experiences. Talking about and acknowledging feelings helps one to make better and healthier choices.
excellent reply purplegirl. No matter how much you need therapy it doesn't take away the responsibility you have towards your husband. As with any other crush you should tell your husband and stop seeing the therapist right now. Go to www.survivinginfidelity.com for more information.

I don't think it's any different to have a crush on your therapist or your dentist. But if you want to stay married you need to stop it and be honest about it.
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#18 of 53 Old 06-06-2009, 03:53 PM
 
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Can we return to the original post on the other thread now?
I'm glad this thread is happening. I too was very concerned and confused about how it could be healthy. I still don't "feel" that its healthy, but if so many other people have found benefit and growth within it, I'm happy for them & will read more in order to understand better. Also in thinking about my aunt's situation (in the other thread... she & her doc ended up married) and have seen that there is still a really odd & unhealthy power dynamic, she's gotten weaker from his power. She got stuck in the transference stage (i guess??) & they haven't really worked thru anything it seems. Now she's married to him for several years and still idolizes him in an unhealthy way. I guess I simply don't know enough about therapy and should continue reading before doling out advice on the other thread.

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#19 of 53 Old 06-06-2009, 04:42 PM
 
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It is actually against the code of ethics for any therapist to become romantically or sexually involved with a client - sometimes for the time of treatment and a certain window of time after treatment ends, sometimes forever. Any therapist that engages in a sexual relationship with a current or former client can get in huge trouble!

As for transference, it isn't all about using Freudian psychoanalysis. The concepts of transference and counter transference are taught in all kinds of helping professions. People develop feelings about each other. In an intense relationship like therapy, the feelings a client develops for their therapist are often repetitions of the kinds of feelings they have had for other important people in their past. The therapist can help the client work through old unresolved feelings that are brought up in therapy. That is why we go to therapy after all - to work through things that are troubling us.

Unless the therapist is responding inappropriately to a client's sexual attraction, it doesn't have to be necessary for someone to leave therapy just because a client is attracted to her therapist. A good therapist will help the client explore why those feelings are happening now and hopefully resolve some problems. Working through such feelings in a safe environment like therapy could actually strengthen a marriage rather than sabotage it.

People also go to therapy for different reasons and for different lengths of time. Stuff like this might not ever come up for someone who is going to a half dozen sessions to work on something specific and not too deep, but a long term in-depth therapy relationship is very different than a short term counselling relationship.
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#20 of 53 Old 06-06-2009, 06:33 PM
 
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I wonder how it can be healthy when many times the "crush" stems from a chemical imbalance. Many people seeking therapy/psychiatry services are mentally ill.

I for instance was a raging bipolar person in the throws of soft mania and feeling all kinds of hot and bothered by my psychiatrist, one day I even told him he had lovely trousers and probably appeared to be on extasy.

This was not a stage in my therapy, I was out of my freaking mind.

My sane self would NEVER in a million billion years get all wired and high and crush on my doctor and have mind rushing thoughts about him, and pine for him until I could see him again. I was sick, that was sickness, not a helpful stage in my therapy.

That is not sanity for a bipolar person. They are also not valid feelings. They are chemical reactions- the imbalanced kind.

So in that context you cannot convince me that it's healthy.

I can see gaining trust or a level of intimacy and going through a stage with a therapist where you feel really bonded, but sex fantasies and continuously thinking of the guy and wanting him and all that- Freud be damned I'm not buying into it.
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#21 of 53 Old 06-06-2009, 06:41 PM
 
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I'm so glad this discussion is happening too. And I have to agree with those who said that there is something fundamentally different about a therapy relationship versus a firefighter relationship. Of course it depends on the kind of therapy, like Shantimama said. But still, if you can trust that your therapist will never cross that line then it seems a little liberating to be able to talk about that kind of stuff. Isn't that kind of the point of therapy? To dig deep into our emotional landscape and uncover stuff that we want to understand better and let go of? (Speaking *very* generally here.)

Of course actions and thoughts are two separate things. We tend to be able to control our actions a lot easier than our thoughts. And if some thoughts are persistant, there's an opportunity for self-awareness.

I think I never was able to trust the therapist to be able to handle my strong emotions. It just felt too weird with paying her for an hour of me freaking out and then having to walk out of her office feeling like crap and go back to my job. But I think she opened me up enough to where I could see some stuff that I didn't need to hold onto anymore and also to where I could find the support that I needed in everyday life, and eventually in my husband! In retrospect, if I had trusted her and been able to talk about my feelings toward her maybe I would have learned some more stuff. Interestingly though, she never really guided me to talk about my feelings toward her. I always just assumed that I "should" only talk about all the other people in my life. It was kind of a weird ending to the therapy because I left to go to Europe for my brother's wedding and then ended up traveling solo for about a month after that and when I came back I REALLY didn't want to go back to the therapy and all the muck that was going on before I left. I got a new job and started fresh and learned so much about myself while traveling. I wanted to be better so I just pretended like I was better and then I was. Fake it 'til you make it, I suppose!

Of course I've had some downturns since then but not at that level of depression. So maybe it did work? I remember the turning point in Europe when I realized that I needed to change my attitude. I was staying with this guy in Italy (my angel) who was very sweet and caring, also he played classical music on the double bass. I had extended my stay several times to be with him but we both knew that I was not destined to stay with him forever. So I was due to leave the next day for a train for Paris and then London and of course very sad and always crying and moping around. I kept saying I was fine but I wasn't. I was just quietly sobbing on the bed and he came in and kept trying to talk to me but I wouldn't let him. Finally he pushed my arms away from my face with his face and said, "You have no reason to be sad! You are lucky! You get to go to Paris and London and travel through Europe! And we got to meet each other and have so much fun together. You are lucky!" And I sort of smiled and wiped the tears away and for some reason, at that moment it STUCK! Isn't that weird? It just stuck. I had been battling depression since a teenager and always feeling sad for myself for so many reasons, but then at that moment I experienced a shift.
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#22 of 53 Old 06-06-2009, 07:20 PM
 
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I'm so glad this discussion is happening too. And I have to agree with those who said that there is something fundamentally different about a therapy relationship versus a firefighter relationship. Of course it depends on the kind of therapy, like Shantimama said. But still, if you can trust that your therapist will never cross that line then it seems a little liberating to be able to talk about that kind of stuff. Isn't that kind of the point of therapy? To dig deep into our emotional landscape and uncover stuff that we want to understand better and let go of? (Speaking *very* generally here.)

Of course actions and thoughts are two separate things. We tend to be able to control our actions a lot easier than our thoughts. And if some thoughts are persistant, there's an opportunity for self-awareness.

I think I never was able to trust the therapist to be able to handle my strong emotions. It just felt too weird with paying her for an hour of me freaking out and then having to walk out of her office feeling like crap and go back to my job. But I think she opened me up enough to where I could see some stuff that I didn't need to hold onto anymore and also to where I could find the support that I needed in everyday life, and eventually in my husband! In retrospect, if I had trusted her and been able to talk about my feelings toward her maybe I would have learned some more stuff. Interestingly though, she never really guided me to talk about my feelings toward her. I always just assumed that I "should" only talk about all the other people in my life. It was kind of a weird ending to the therapy because I left to go to Europe for my brother's wedding and then ended up traveling solo for about a month after that and when I came back I REALLY didn't want to go back to the therapy and all the muck that was going on before I left. I got a new job and started fresh and learned so much about myself while traveling. I wanted to be better so I just pretended like I was better and then I was. Fake it 'til you make it, I suppose!

Of course I've had some downturns since then but not at that level of depression. So maybe it did work? I remember the turning point in Europe when I realized that I needed to change my attitude. I was staying with this guy in Italy (my angel) who was very sweet and caring, also he played classical music on the double bass. I had extended my stay several times to be with him but we both knew that I was not destined to stay with him forever. So I was due to leave the next day for a train for Paris and then London and of course very sad and always crying and moping around. I kept saying I was fine but I wasn't. I was just quietly sobbing on the bed and he came in and kept trying to talk to me but I wouldn't let him. Finally he pushed my arms away from my face with his face and said, "You have no reason to be sad! You are lucky! You get to go to Paris and London and travel through Europe! And we got to meet each other and have so much fun together. You are lucky!" And I sort of smiled and wiped the tears away and for some reason, at that moment it STUCK! Isn't that weird? It just stuck. I had been battling depression since a teenager and always feeling sad for myself for so many reasons, but then at that moment I experienced a shift.
That is one of the most fascinating things about the human psyche. That it's possible to experience shifts like that. Amazing. I've tried it myself many years ago and it changed my life.
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#23 of 53 Old 06-06-2009, 09:31 PM
 
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I wonder how it can be healthy when many times the "crush" stems from a chemical imbalance. Many people seeking therapy/psychiatry services are mentally ill.

I for instance was a raging bipolar person in the throws of soft mania and feeling all kinds of hot and bothered by my psychiatrist, one day I even told him he had lovely trousers and probably appeared to be on extasy.

This was not a stage in my therapy, I was out of my freaking mind.

My sane self would NEVER in a million billion years get all wired and high and crush on my doctor and have mind rushing thoughts about him, and pine for him until I could see him again. I was sick, that was sickness, not a helpful stage in my therapy.

That is not sanity for a bipolar person. They are also not valid feelings. They are chemical reactions- the imbalanced kind.

So in that context you cannot convince me that it's healthy.

I can see gaining trust or a level of intimacy and going through a stage with a therapist where you feel really bonded, but sex fantasies and continuously thinking of the guy and wanting him and all that- Freud be damned I'm not buying into it.

Of course it's not the same thing. I don't see anyone here saying that all therapeutic relationships are the same. Short term counselling, consultation with a psychiatrist for medication to sort out chemical imbalances, and longer term therapy for emotional issues are all completely different situations.

Some people are in therapy because of mental illness and chemical imbalances, but many, may people are in therapy to help with non-chemical problems from difficult relationships, grief issues, abuse issues.

I also don't see anyone saying that it is 'necessary' or 'good' for people to have sexual feelings for their therapist. They are simply saying that it happens sometimes and it can be worked through; it isn't automatically a terrible thing. If it happens a good therapist will do nothing to encourage those feelings but rather will help you figure out why you feel that way and what is going on in your present or past experience that makes it an issue right now.
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#24 of 53 Old 06-06-2009, 10:55 PM
 
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i've always had girl therapists and i have had friendly feelings toward them but not romantic or sexual. i went to a couple of guy therapists but never felt comfortable enough to actually talk to them about anything remotely important. a few of them skeeved me out.

i can see where someone might develop feelings for a therapist since you spend a bunch of time talking to them about all kinds of personal stuff. the only time therapy has ever been effective for me is when i felt like i was having a conversation with a person i actually enjoyed talking to. it didnt feel like 'therapy' per se. i can see where it would be easy to forget that they are doing their job... they just happen to be good at it.

when i worked at the psychiatric hospital it was not uncommon to have patients get wicked pissed at us when we put the contents of our conversations with them in their file b/c they were talking to us as a friend. for us there was never that distinction and we were always honest about that but i think sometimes they would forget. we also had girls ask us to promise not to tell anyone... of course i cant make that promise b/c i am not a friend... making that promise may be harmful and i cant do that.

there was one girl who got fired for giving one of the boys in her unit her phone number. so in that case she crossed that line and lord only knows what the ramifications could have been. it was her responsibility to take herself out of the situation and let someone else work with him.
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#25 of 53 Old 06-07-2009, 01:08 AM
 
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I wonder how it can be healthy when many times the "crush" stems from a chemical imbalance. Many people seeking therapy/psychiatry services are mentally ill.

I for instance was a raging bipolar person in the throws of soft mania and feeling all kinds of hot and bothered by my psychiatrist, one day I even told him he had lovely trousers and probably appeared to be on extasy.

This was not a stage in my therapy, I was out of my freaking mind.

My sane self would NEVER in a million billion years get all wired and high and crush on my doctor and have mind rushing thoughts about him, and pine for him until I could see him again. I was sick, that was sickness, not a helpful stage in my therapy.

That is not sanity for a bipolar person. They are also not valid feelings. They are chemical reactions- the imbalanced kind.

So in that context you cannot convince me that it's healthy.

I can see gaining trust or a level of intimacy and going through a stage with a therapist where you feel really bonded, but sex fantasies and continuously thinking of the guy and wanting him and all that- Freud be damned I'm not buying into it.

Word.

We're all different people with different opinions, I get that, but I'm glad I'm not y'alls psychiatrist

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#26 of 53 Old 06-07-2009, 09:05 AM
 
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Transference frequently occurs in therapy. I'm not sure you can make a case for it helping or hurting the therapy, but it is a powerful occurrence that cannot be ignored. As a therapist, I am always mindful of the transference and counter transference dynamics. My responsibility is to help the client understand what is going on, maintain the boundaries and determine if it is appropriate for me to continue to treat the client.
Again, transference refers to ALL of the feelings a client has toward a therapist. It is not exclusive to romantic/sexual feelings. Often, clients not aware of their feelings, which a therapist identifies as transference. For example, I had a therapist whom I felt took great care of me, understand my issues and did a great job helping me----transference! It wasn't a big deal--not in this instance.



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#27 of 53 Old 06-07-2009, 09:20 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Porcelain Interior View Post
I wonder how it can be healthy when many times the "crush" stems from a chemical imbalance. Many people seeking therapy/psychiatry services are mentally ill.

I for instance was a raging bipolar person in the throws of soft mania and feeling all kinds of hot and bothered by my psychiatrist, one day I even told him he had lovely trousers and probably appeared to be on extasy.

This was not a stage in my therapy, I was out of my freaking mind.

My sane self would NEVER in a million billion years get all wired and high and crush on my doctor and have mind rushing thoughts about him, and pine for him until I could see him again. I was sick, that was sickness, not a helpful stage in my therapy.



That is not sanity for a bipolar person. They are also not valid feelings. They are chemical reactions- the imbalanced kind.

So in that context you cannot convince me that it's healthy.

I can see gaining trust or a level of intimacy and going through a stage with a therapist where you feel really bonded, but sex fantasies and continuously thinking of the guy and wanting him and all that- Freud be damned I'm not buying into it.
Interesting point but many people, who are manic become hypersexual.
When they come down, they can't believe the 'damage' they've done and are more rational in their thoughts and behaviors. This, however is very different the transference dynamic.

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#28 of 53 Old 06-07-2009, 07:37 PM
 
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fek&fuzz, has all your questions on transference in the theraputic process been answered?

"There is a special place in Hell for women who do not help other women." ~ Madeleine Albright, first woman U. S. Secretary of State.
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#29 of 53 Old 06-07-2009, 07:56 PM - Thread Starter
 
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fek&fuzz, has all your questions on transference in the theraputic process been answered?
I guess. It seems, like with most things, that there are differing opinions. But people should feel free to continue to discuss as they wish.
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#30 of 53 Old 06-08-2009, 12:09 AM
 
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I guess. It seems, like with most things, that there are differing opinions. But people should feel free to continue to discuss as they wish.
Like most things in a public forum, "differing opinions" is a good choice of words, fek. TY

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