Why is Rice cereal SO BAD? - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#31 of 54 Old 01-26-2011, 02:26 PM
 
pregnant@40's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 585
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Hannah32 View Post

Meat puree is nasty. My baby wouldn't eat it. 


Funny. But there are many ways to make it, and kids need foods offered to them several times before the parent gives up (what is the often cited number? 20 times, or something like that?). Meat is naturally high in protein, iron, zinc, and B vitamins, so I hope my baby takes it! smile.gif

pregnant@40 is offline  
#32 of 54 Old 01-26-2011, 02:34 PM
 
Hannah32's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 470
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I also hated the smell. It's all good now. He's old enough for bits of our meat and loves to chomp on chicken bones! Yum! 

Hannah32 is offline  
#33 of 54 Old 01-26-2011, 02:49 PM
 
McGucks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: among the wildflowers
Posts: 1,245
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

We give our 10 m.o. regular adult oatmeal, both dry and cooked.  Is this bad?  This is a very interesting topic.


 sleepytime.gif I got tired of my signature, but I still love my children and husband and miss my little brotherkid.gif

McGucks is offline  
#34 of 54 Old 01-26-2011, 08:00 PM
 
newsolarmomma2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 151
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I say go with what works. whats the point of being baby centered if you don't follow his cues and take rules that are meant to be genreral to heart instead? I started mine on whole grain brown rice cereal at 4 months, it's has helped a lot with sleep too. He has been sitting up since 3months old and will grab whole food outta my hand if Im not watching. I don't think there is anything bad about it, but every baby is different. My DS is 5.5 months and HUGE, healthy @ 23#, 26"

They say nothing until 6 months NOW, because it might reduce the milk intake. Remember that the feeding recommendations change every decade- when I told my Mom I wasn't going to give him solids until 6 months she was aghast smile.gif (I ate baby food from 10 weeks on)

newsolarmomma2 is offline  
#35 of 54 Old 01-26-2011, 11:02 PM
 
pregnant@40's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 585
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Newsolarmomma2, thanks for reminding us to be relaxed about things. You're right, guidelines change constantly. When my mother had me, her OB told her to just give me pizza if I wanted it, whenever I wanted it. My mom was flabbergasted, since I had no teeth. But it illustrates how relaxed people used to be about things, compared to today. Our generation is a bit hyperaware & obsessive about every move of parenting.

pregnant@40 is offline  
#36 of 54 Old 01-27-2011, 06:05 AM
 
staceychev's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Jersey, the Southern one
Posts: 3,239
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by caedenmomma View Post

We give our 10 m.o. regular adult oatmeal, both dry and cooked.  Is this bad?  This is a very interesting topic.



My 10 month old has only had adult oatmeal. Personally, I think baby oatmeal is a marketing scam. If you want a grain mush softer for your babe, cook it with a little more liquid, like the difference between cooked rice and congee, the Chinese rice porridge. 

 

Feeding the Whole Family has good ideas for grain mushes to make for baby and adults with real grains, not processed cereal. 


Stacey teaching teens to read & write... Daddy plays ska, DD1 (7/05) loves trees & princesses, & DD2 (3/10) loves mommy-milk! Please get your kids tested for lead.
staceychev is offline  
#37 of 54 Old 01-27-2011, 06:58 AM
 
North_Of_60's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Beautiful British Columbia
Posts: 7,622
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

My only suggestion to the new moms on this forum (and everyone else reading) is take all of the "statistics" stated in this thread with a grain of salt. Do your own research, and file this thread away under anecdotal information. Because that's all this is.


Frankenstein never scared me. Marsupials do. Because they're FAST.
North_Of_60 is offline  
#38 of 54 Old 01-27-2011, 08:17 AM
 
mom2happy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 992
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by North_Of_60 View Post

My only suggestion to the new moms on this forum (and everyone else reading) is take all of the "statistics" stated in this thread with a grain of salt. Do your own research, and file this thread away under anecdotal information. Because that's all this is.



 

The scientifically proven facts on what, when, why, why not a baby should have this or that keeps changing anyway.

My advice is to think logically and follow your own instincts about what your baby should eat.

 

 

 

mom2happy is offline  
#39 of 54 Old 01-27-2011, 09:55 AM
 
SilverFish's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Montreal
Posts: 877
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

rice cereal isn't BAD. it isn't going to permanently damage your child in any way, neither is your decision to feed solids at 4 months, 6 months, or delay further.

 

however, rice cereal isn't the best thing to feed your baby either. it's not particularly nutritious, it doesn't have much flavour, and it's mostly an invention of the baby food industry. there are a ton of other options out there that make a good choice for baby's first food, whether you want to start with purees or follow BLW. whenever possible, i think it's best to feed a baby foods that your family actually eats... congee, oatmeal, grits, polenta -- these are all more natural forms of processed and packaged baby cereal. but, i would still chose to give my baby more nutrient packed first foods, like sweet potato, avocado, banana or other soft fruits and veggies. sweet potato and squash are especially good, as they are high in iron, easily digestible and delicious to babies.

 

Thalia the Muse likes this.
SilverFish is offline  
#40 of 54 Old 01-28-2011, 08:23 AM
 
Jane91's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 167
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

As part of the dicussion on grains -- a 2006 study published by the journal Pediatrics found that early introduction of wheat (before 6 months) appeared to be protective (rather than triggering) for wheat allergies:

 

"Children who were first exposed to cereals after 6 months of age had an increased risk of wheat allergy compared with children first exposed to cereals before 6 months of age (after controlling for confounders including a family history of allergic disorders and history of food allergy before 6 months of age). All 4 children with detectable wheat-specific immunoglobulin E were first exposed to cereal grains after 6 months. A first-degree relative with asthma, eczema, or hives was also independently associated with an increased risk of wheat-allergy development.

 

CONCLUSIONS. Delaying initial exposure to cereal grains until after 6 months may increase the risk of developing wheat allergy. These results do not support delaying introduction of cereal grains for the protection of food allergy."

MJB likes this.
Jane91 is offline  
#41 of 54 Old 01-28-2011, 09:41 AM
MJB
 
MJB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: United States
Posts: 1,565
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by asraidevin View Post

I started my daughter on solids at 4 months and I regret it. NOt because she has allergy issues, which most people say now days can't be prevented by delaying foods. But becuase she didn't gain weight after starting on solids. I also weaned her at a year, which I regret becuase she gained even less after that. Breastmilk has all the nutrition needed for baby.


I started my sons on solids at 6 mos. My middle son only gained 3 lbs. between 4 and 12 mos. (from 18 to 21 lbs) I started my daughter on solids at 4 mos. Not surprisingly, her weight gain also slowed at 4 months. It's a common growth pattern for breastfed infants that, IMO, has nothing to do with the introduction of solid foods.

MJB is offline  
#42 of 54 Old 01-28-2011, 10:24 AM
 
North_Of_60's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Beautiful British Columbia
Posts: 7,622
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mom2happy View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by North_Of_60 View Post

My only suggestion to the new moms on this forum (and everyone else reading) is take all of the "statistics" stated in this thread with a grain of salt. Do your own research, and file this thread away under anecdotal information. Because that's all this is.



 

The scientifically proven facts on what, when, why, why not a baby should have this or that keeps changing anyway.

My advice is to think logically and follow your own instincts about what your baby should eat.

 

 

 

 

I was mainly referring to this statement made by Alegna:

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna View Post

At a year 75% of nutrition should still be breastmilk.

 

This information is not backed by a credible reference, but is instead a personal opinion phrased as fact, when in actuality it has the potential to be dangerous to families with individual dietary needs that differ from Alegna's. What works for one family will not necessarily work for another. For me personally, at one year postpartum my body was NOT capable of supplying 75% of my daughter's dietary needs and she would have presented with FTT had I insisted, based on a forum members PERSONAL ADVICE, that she ONLY have 25% solid food in her diet.

 

Presenting opinions as "facts" without citing a reference can be deceiving, and I think it's worth noting that before anyone takes dietary advice from the internet that they do some personal research.

Thalia the Muse, mauri456 and MJB like this.

Frankenstein never scared me. Marsupials do. Because they're FAST.
North_Of_60 is offline  
#43 of 54 Old 01-28-2011, 11:02 AM
 
North_Of_60's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Beautiful British Columbia
Posts: 7,622
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Just for grins and giggles, I did some quick googling.

 

Depending on where you look, the recommended caloric needs of a one year old range from 1000-1300 calories per day.

 

http://preventdisease.com/fitness/nutrition/articles/eatyourage.html

 

http://www.drpaul.com/nutrition/calories.html

 

According to Kellymom (http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/milk/change-milkfat.html), there is an average of 22 calories per ounce of breastmilk. 1000-1300 calories is equivalent to 45.5 - 59 ounces of breastmilk. So in order for a 1 one year old to consume 75% of their 1000-1300 calories per day, they would need to consume 34-44 ounces of breastmilk per day.

 

I don't know about anyone else, but at one year postpartum I am 100% sure, beyond a shadow of a doubt, that my body was NOT capable of producing up to 44 ounces of milk.

 

The remaining 25% does NOT translate to a lot of solid food. This is just a few examples of  toddler appropriate snacks:

 

Half a banana = 100 calories

 

10 grapes = 34 calories

 

Half an avocado = 161 calories

 

Half a cup of sweet potato = 90 calories

 

5 Saltine crackers = 63 calories

 

1/4 cup whole wheat pasta = 43 calories

 

 

So.... half a banana, a quarter of an avocado, 5 saltine crackers and 10 grapes is roughly 277 calories. A whole banana and a handful of pasta is 243 calories. My daughter ate WAY more than that in one day, and quite honestly, withholding solid food from a 1 year old to force them to nurse more is rather cruel, in my opinion.

Thalia the Muse and MJB like this.

Frankenstein never scared me. Marsupials do. Because they're FAST.
North_Of_60 is offline  
#44 of 54 Old 01-28-2011, 01:29 PM
 
Hannah32's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 470
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by North_Of_60 View Post


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mom2happy View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by North_Of_60 View Post

My only suggestion to the new moms on this forum (and everyone else reading) is take all of the "statistics" stated in this thread with a grain of salt. Do your own research, and file this thread away under anecdotal information. Because that's all this is.



 

The scientifically proven facts on what, when, why, why not a baby should have this or that keeps changing anyway.

My advice is to think logically and follow your own instincts about what your baby should eat.

 

 

 

 

I was mainly referring to this statement made by Alegna:

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna View Post

At a year 75% of nutrition should still be breastmilk.

 

This information is not backed by a credible reference, but is instead a personal opinion phrased as fact, when in actuality it has the potential to be dangerous to families with individual dietary needs that differ from Alegna's. What works for one family will not necessarily work for another. For me personally, at one year postpartum my body was NOT capable of supplying 75% of my daughter's dietary needs and she would have presented with FTT had I insisted, based on a forum members PERSONAL ADVICE, that she ONLY have 25% solid food in her diet.

 

Presenting opinions as "facts" without citing a reference can be deceiving, and I think it's worth noting that before anyone takes dietary advice from the internet that they do some personal research.


I really agree with this. There's just no way my milk is capable of meeting all my son's nutritional needs and he's only 7 months. He nurses at least 5 times per day and gets bottles, between 6-8 oz while I'm at work. I figure I get between 2-5 oz in per feeding, so he's probably getting his 24 oz or so per day of breast milk. However, my baby never stops moving. He'd be really hungry if he only got that and a few nibbles. 

 

So we do baby food and avocados. He'll eat a whole avocado in a sitting, or two jars of food sometimes. I think he takes in around 900 or so calories a day. He's not a chubby guy at all. He's hanging out around the 25% or so (this is where he was at birth). Up from 10% when I started solids. 

 

How much a baby moves is a relevant factor. Active babies need more food. 

Hannah32 is offline  
#45 of 54 Old 01-29-2011, 05:05 PM
 
karen1968's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Milwaukie, OR
Posts: 3,455
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

When thinking about how much milk your body can and can't produce, remember that breast milk production truly is limited by demand. At 1 year, my DS was nursing up to 12 times a day still, and my body WAS capable of providing all the nutrition he needed, if he had needed it to. The more solids your baby eats, the less breastmilk he demands from your body and it is entirely feasible for your supply to drop.

 

I'm not sure I entirely agree with Alegna's assertion that 75% of nutrition should come from breastmilk at one year, but a mama who has been feeding by demand and nurses before offering solids could supply 35+ ounces of milk in a (24 hour) day.

 

 

Quote:
How much a baby moves is a relevant factor. Active babies need more food.

 

So true!  True of adults, true of kids, true of babies. Plus, every person has a unique metabolism and needs differing amounts of calories just to get by.


Karen love.gif James -- DS drum.gif (2/07) DD baby.gif (11/05/10) angel1.gif (9/05) (10/09)
karen1968 is offline  
#46 of 54 Old 01-30-2011, 06:44 PM
Banned
 
accountclosed2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 1,117
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'd have to agree that in my opinion, yes, a mother probably CAN supply enough milk to cover her 12 month old's complete nutritional needs (except possibly for some specific things like iron). I wouldn't be surprised if I could now, and DD is nearly 3. I'm quite sure I could even push my supply up if she would decide to exclusively breastfeed!

I read somewhere that during the first six months supply is regulated a lot by hormones (though demand matters too), but that after 6 months the hormones play less of a role, making it entirely about demand.

We had supply issues at first, by 6 months I had finally managed to, painfully slowly, push my supply up to what my baby needed. Every tiny increase in my supply took forever. But in the year after 6 months I found that all I needed was a day when DD feeds like crazy (teething, a bit of a cold, unsettled for other reasons), and by next day I'm engorged. It still happens, occasionally (ha, I was never engorged when she was tiny!).

It took a long time before DD actually ate a lot of solids regularly (she loved meals but wasn't that interested in ingesting much), but her weight gain shot up after 6 months, and she's now growing like weed. So yes, while I couldn't provide all she needed at 3 months, I'm quite sure I could at 12 months.

For this to work, though, you need to have a cooperative baby who wants to breastfeed, and who likes to spend time pushing the supply up!
accountclosed2 is offline  
#47 of 54 Old 01-31-2011, 08:39 AM
 
Anastasiya's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 1,570
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Well, all I can say is that these baby food threads always used to amaze me, because I had children who refused any types of solids till well past 11 months! So I never pureed, purchased or pre-chewed baby food until my latest one came along, who loved baby food.

 

My third did not willingly accept any food till he was 14 months, so I must also say that yes, the supply and demand of breastfeeding can keep up and fully nourish a baby into his/her first year, assuming there is nothing there to take its place.

 

Anyway, carry on! :)

 

Anastasiya is offline  
#48 of 54 Old 01-31-2011, 10:06 AM
 
asraidevin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posts: 169
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by MJB View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by asraidevin View Post

I started my daughter on solids at 4 months and I regret it. Not because she has allergy issues, which most people say now days can't be prevented by delaying foods. But becuase she didn't gain weight after starting on solids. I also weaned her at a year, which I regret becuase she gained even less after that. Breastmilk has all the nutrition needed for baby.


I started my sons on solids at 6 mos. My middle son only gained 3 lbs. between 4 and 12 mos. (from 18 to 21 lbs) I started my daughter on solids at 4 mos. Not surprisingly, her weight gain also slowed at 4 months. It's a common growth pattern for breastfed infants that, IMO, has nothing to do with the introduction of solid foods.


My son had consistent 5-7 oz weight gains/week from birth until we started solids. He's sllowed not as much as she did, but he also uses the breast as a pacifier and has a greateer intake of milk. She also slept 8 hours by 8 months, he's 10 months and is up at least 3 tims a night.


I was off to save the world, but I got distracted by something shiny.
asraidevin is offline  
#49 of 54 Old 02-01-2011, 10:26 AM
 
North_Of_60's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Beautiful British Columbia
Posts: 7,622
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


 

Quote:]
Originally Posted by Anastasiya View Post

Well, all I can say is that these baby food threads always used to amaze me, because I had children who refused any types of solids till well past 11 months! So I never pureed, purchased or pre-chewed baby food until my latest one came along, who loved baby food.

 

My third did not willingly accept any food till he was 14 months, so I must also say that yes, the supply and demand of breastfeeding can keep up and fully nourish a baby into his/her first year, assuming there is nothing there to take its place.

 

Anyway, carry on! :)

 


 

And assuming one's body is capable. The assumption that EVERYONE can and should is dangerous. An undiagnosed problem could, under the right circumstances, lead to a very unhealthy baby were a mother to with hold solids assuming she is among the group of people who CAN supply 75% of her baby's dietary needs through breastfeeding. Not everyone can. I know this from personal experience. I also know, through personal experience, what it is like to struggle to the point of self deprecation to succeed at something that is medically not possible. However, at the time, I didn't know that. I just kept reading posts about how it should be possible, and the first 2 years of my daughters life was miserable because I tried to live up to the expectations of a bunch of strangers.

 

I'm trying to let new mothers know that they needn't stress themselves out or make themselves miserable to do what others do. There is no room for peer pressure in parenting. Do what works for YOU.


Frankenstein never scared me. Marsupials do. Because they're FAST.
North_Of_60 is offline  
#50 of 54 Old 02-01-2011, 11:16 AM
 
Anastasiya's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 1,570
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I agree. There are always exceptions.

 

I never said exclusive breastfeeding "will" work, I said "can", mostly in agreement with Karen and Aislin's posts.

 

 

Originally Posted by North_Of_60 View Post

 


 

Quote:]
Originally Posted by Anastasiya View Post

Well, all I can say is that these baby food threads always used to amaze me, because I had children who refused any types of solids till well past 11 months! So I never pureed, purchased or pre-chewed baby food until my latest one came along, who loved baby food.

 

My third did not willingly accept any food till he was 14 months, so I must also say that yes, the supply and demand of breastfeeding can keep up and fully nourish a baby into his/her first year, assuming there is nothing there to take its place.

 

Anyway, carry on! :)

 


 

And assuming one's body is capable. The assumption that EVERYONE can and should is dangerous. An undiagnosed problem could, under the right circumstances, lead to a very unhealthy baby were a mother to with hold solids assuming she is among the group of people who CAN supply 75% of her baby's dietary needs through breastfeeding. Not everyone can. I know this from personal experience. I also know, through personal experience, what it is like to struggle to the point of self deprecation to succeed at something that is medically not possible. However, at the time, I didn't know that. I just kept reading posts about how it should be possible, and the first 2 years of my daughters life was miserable because I tried to live up to the expectations of a bunch of strangers.

 

I'm trying to let new mothers know that they needn't stress themselves out or make themselves miserable to do what others do. There is no room for peer pressure in parenting. Do what works for YOU.



Anastasiya is offline  
#51 of 54 Old 02-01-2011, 11:23 AM
 
goldenwillow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: In the trees
Posts: 1,128
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CrunchyChristianMama View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by paulamc View Post
Evie's Mama - I'd like to read more about this. Could you let me know the source for the information on grains? Thanks!
We're mostly Traditional Foodies, so a lot of my research comes from Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon and the Weston A. Price Foundation. Although I will put it out there right now that I DO NOT agree with a lot of what they say about feeding babies, I just agree with their research about food itself (which is where the info on grains comes from). For feeding babies, I prefer Real Food for Mother and Baby by Nina Planck.



Agreed..  we are in the same boat as you. 

 

I was a rice fed, soy formula baby and I have soooo many intolerance's it is pathetic. 


'09   
goldenwillow is offline  
#52 of 54 Old 02-01-2011, 11:26 AM
 
goldenwillow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: In the trees
Posts: 1,128
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by North_Of_60 View Post


 

Quote:]
Originally Posted by Anastasiya View Post

Well, all I can say is that these baby food threads always used to amaze me, because I had children who refused any types of solids till well past 11 months! So I never pureed, purchased or pre-chewed baby food until my latest one came along, who loved baby food.

 

My third did not willingly accept any food till he was 14 months, so I must also say that yes, the supply and demand of breastfeeding can keep up and fully nourish a baby into his/her first year, assuming there is nothing there to take its place.

 

Anyway, carry on! :)

 


 

And assuming one's body is capable. The assumption that EVERYONE can and should is dangerous. An undiagnosed problem could, under the right circumstances, lead to a very unhealthy baby were a mother to with hold solids assuming she is among the group of people who CAN supply 75% of her baby's dietary needs through breastfeeding. Not everyone can. I know this from personal experience. I also know, through personal experience, what it is like to struggle to the point of self deprecation to succeed at something that is medically not possible. However, at the time, I didn't know that. I just kept reading posts about how it should be possible, and the first 2 years of my daughters life was miserable because I tried to live up to the expectations of a bunch of strangers.

 

I'm trying to let new mothers know that they needn't stress themselves out or make themselves miserable to do what others do. There is no room for peer pressure in parenting. Do what works for YOU.



I agree with this as well....

 

It is important to consider what a traditional food diet suggests about rice.  I know from my own experience that it wrecked my gut along with all the freaking soy being introduced at day 2. 


'09   
goldenwillow is offline  
#53 of 54 Old 02-01-2011, 06:57 PM
 
MacKinnon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: The Great Lakes State
Posts: 3,844
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

As I sit here with my 5 month old in my lap, I find this thread very interesting. I saw a great interview with Dr Greene today, this is a very multi-facted discussion with lots of good points.

 

I would like to remind everyone to please be respectful of each other as we post. It's great to learn more, and have new ideas presented, the discussion is worth having, so let's remember to disagree in a kind and appropriate manner!


sleepytime.gifC.- WOHM, CPST Instructor, and all around busy Mama to  blowkiss.gifA.- 02/04, bouncy.gif I. 01/07,babyf.gifE. 09/10 and

stork-suprise.gif expecting the surprise of our lives Fall 2012!
 

MacKinnon is offline  
#54 of 54 Old 02-15-2011, 12:00 PM
 
pregnant@40's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 585
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

To North_of_60, amen! I totally agree.

pregnant@40 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off